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Civil War History in Montgomery County, PA




PA Civil War Soldiers of Montgomery County

Bean, Theodore W., History of Montgomery County, 1884.


The violent conflict of political opinion which culminated in a breach of the public peace on the 19th of April, 1861, was sectional in its character. The cause which evoked the long and acrimonious discussion involved a system of civilization with questionable commercial values, and the overthrow of domestic institutions to which the people of the Southern States had become attached by interest, inclination and climate. An "irrepressible conflict" suddenly became an "impending crisis," followed by the shock of arms. Northern statesmen of rare sagacity and long experience in public life were blinded by their delusive hopes, and predicted a short struggle and easy triumph over the insurgents. The haughty and impetuous spirit of Southern leaders underrated the sturdy manhood and marvelous resources of the North, and, with more zeal than prudence, precipitated hostilities, the magnitude of which awakened the civilized powers of the world to the importance of the conflict. Both sections sadly failed in their estimate of the relative strength and endurance of the combatants. The South obtained an early advantage in the first battles fought, and entitled themselves to the rights of belligerents, compelling the national government to treat with them as equals in war. The doctrine of a peaceable dissolution of the national government, intended by its founders to be perpetual, was strangely confounded with the rights of revolution, and dissenting minorities, to fatally obstruct the popular will as expressed by the national legislature, naturally took refuge behind the indefinite reserved powers of the States. A well-marked difference of opinion always existed in reference to the Constitution of the United States, and interpretations of the fundamental law by courts of last resort were not always accepted by the people as final. Early instances of the spirit of revolt, incident to all new, forms of government, were experienced in the Shay Rebellion of 1784, in the Whiskey Insurrection of 1791, the Hartford Convention of 1814, and the attempted nullification of 1833. Slight wrongs, real or imaginary, such as induced violence and resistance to the existing government, readily yielded to wise councils and the prompt suppressive measures of the national government. But when a great evil, such as the enslavement of four millions of human beings, became a subject of political controversy, sectionalizing thirty millions of people; the North uncompromising in its hostility to the institution, the South wedded to it; the North insisting, by its majorities, upon union and universal freedom, the South fiercely maintaining the right to peaceably secede and establish a rival republic, - these conflicting theories, agitated by astute statesmen through a formation period of fifty years, without significant or well settled precedent, - in view of such a contention, it will not, perhaps, be the subject of historical amazement that amicable adjustment defied the best efforts of political economists, and that brutal and terrible agencies of war were necessarily invoked to settle the dispute and vindicate the right.

The part taken by the people of Montgomery County during the four years' hostilities will possibly never be fully told. The novel and exciting experience of those who responded to the first call of President Lincoln for three months' troops was memorable, if not so important as that which resulted from the long terms of enlistments following the disaster at Bull Run on the 21st day of July, 1861. The great uprising of the North which quickly succeeded the fall of Fort Sumter was a national impulse, and the movement of men to the defense of the capital was through an excited and indignant populace. Great as the perils of war were known to be, they were extravagantly magnified at the time, and the anxiety and solicitude for those who were the first to march was shown by every household in the county. Few among those who witnessed the memorable scene of the departure of the Fourth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers from Norristown, on the morning of April 20, 1861, will ever forget the event. The several companies from the borough had been hastily recruited to their maximum. Many of the members being residents of the rural districts, had hastened to town, signed the roll, and, returning to bid the dear ones good-by, thoroughly aroused the plain country-folks, hundreds of whom came trooping into town, "to see them off."

Fort Sumter had fallen, its brave defenders had gallantly resisted the skillfully devised preparations made for its reduction, the flag of our country had been shot down, and although not a single man of the garrison had been killed, yet the loyal manhood of the North felt that the great wrong and insult must be promptly avenged. No response to country's call was ever more promptly made by more patriotic men than those who filled the first quota of seventy-five thousand troops. True it is, in the light of the terrible struggle that subsequently ensued, the service now seems inconsiderable, but history will always accord to those who were first in the field of peril' a distinguished honor. Those who were present when the regiment was in line in front of the court-house surrounded by thousands of our best citizens and the families of those in the ranks, will recall the intense excitement that prevailed. The painful solicitude of the hour was deepened as the impassioned and eloquent words of the Hon. Daniel Smyser, then president judge of the district, fell upon attentive ears from the steps of the court-yard. The word country had a new and deeper significance for the men of that generation than was ever felt before. The beautiful flag presented to these gallant men by the ladies of the county was felt to symbolize hopes and interests paramount to all other considerations, and for the time being all difference of political opinion was subordinated to an exalted love of country. Men of all political opinions were requested to "put out their flags," and it is due to truth to say that in deference to public sentiment, that stood not upon trifles, the request was complied with. The youth and manhood of the county were well represented in the rank and file of the command, and after receiving the public assurance of magistrate and people that their conduct was commended, and come what might, they would receive the hearty support of their friends, they wheeled into column, and to the quick time of stirring martial music, amidst the ringing of bells, the cheers of thousands of men, and tokens of love and admiration of their devoted countrywomen, they marched through the town to Bridgeport, where they took the cars for Harrisburg. The following condensed statement contains the material facts of the short experience of the organization:



Fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

4th Regiment

- The Fourth Volunteer Regiment originated in the First Regiment, Second Brigade, Second Division of the State militia, organized under the militia act of 1858. It consisted of six companies and had a full regimental organization, the officers holding State commissions. In response to the call of the President, a public meeting was held at Norristown, Montgomery Co., on the 16th of April, at which the feeling of patriotic devotion to the cause of the government was emphatically displayed, and resolutions were passed pledging assistance to the families of such as volunteered. On the following day the services of the militia regiment were tendered to the Governor for the term of three months, and were accepted on condition that the command would report in Harrisburg within four days. The officers immediately commenced the enrollment of recruits, and at the expiration of the time appointed some six hundred men from Montgomery County and vicinity were ready to move.

The excitement and gloom incident to their departure can only be felt by a people unused to war. All business was suspended, and the whole population appeared upon the streets. Flags were provided by the ladies of Norristown, which were presented with appropriate ceremonies. On Saturday, April 20th, the command proceeded by rail to Harrisburg, and reached Camp Curtin at two o'clock P. M. It was the intention to have remained in camp till a sufficient number of men could have been procured from Montgomery County to fill the regiment to its maximum number; but the urgent necessities of the government rendered this purpose impracticable, and orders were issued to form a regiment immediately from such companies as were in camp. This order had the effect to change the command from a militia to a volunteer organization.

An election was accordingly held, which resulted in the choice of the same field officers as those holding the militia commissions, which were as follows: John F. Hartranft, of Norristown, colonel; Edward Schall, of Norristown, lieutenant-colonel; Edwin Schall, of Norristown, major. Charles Hunsicker was appointed adjutant.

Scarcely was the organization completed when marching orders were received. Leaving Camp Curtin on the evening of the 21st of April, the regiment proceeded by rail to Philadelphia, where it was ordered by General Patterson to report to Colonel Dare, of the Twenty-third. Taking one company of his own and the Fourth Regiment, Colonel Dare proceeded by rail to Perryville, Md., and took possession of the town, making such disposition of the troops as would prevent, a surprise.

On the following day General Patterson ordered the regiment to proceed without delay to Washington. Immediate application was made to Colonel Dare for transportation by steamer to Annapolis, the route by Baltimore being then closed. Not feeling secure from capture, Colonel Dare only gave transportation for one wing of the regiment, which embarked under command of Colonel Hartranft. Arriving at Annapolis, the troops were disembarked and quartered in the buildings belonging to the Naval Academy, by order of Major-General Butler, then in command of the town. The left wing, under command of Major Schall, was detained several days at Perryville for the security of the port.

It was expected that the men would be fully clothed, armed and equipped at Harrisburg before marching. But when the urgent appeals came from Washington for troops, it was not the time for the patriotic citizen-soldier to hesitate, and the regiment marched without uniforms or equipments, the men being armed with muskets, and provided with ammunition, which they were obliged to carry in their pockets. Clothing was sent to the regiment on the 28th of April, but not until some time in June were proper uniforms supplied.

In pursuance of orders, the regiment proceeded, on the 8th of May, to Washington, and was quartered in the Assembly buildings and in a church near by. Transportation and camp and garrison equipage not having been supplied by the State or national government, the regiment was prevented from going into camp. The close confinement of the men in crowded quarters soon produced its legitimate results. Sickness, which, up to this time, had been scarcely known in the regiment, now began to prevail to a considerable extent. As soon as tents were received it was at once established in camp, about two miles from the city, toward Bladensburg. When the necessary equipage was furnished regimental drills and inspections were commenced, and vigorous measures taken to make the regiment effective. On the 24th of June it was ordered to Alexandria, in anticipation of an attack by the enemy, and was soon after placed in camp on Shuter's Hill, where the regular drills and inspections were resumed.

On Sunday, June 30th, at two o'clock in the morning, the pickets of the regiment, stationed on the old Fairfax road, under command of Lieutenant M.R. McClennan, were attacked by about thirty of the enemy. They were repulsed by our pickets, only three in number, who killed Sergeant Haines, previously a clerk in the Treasury Department at Washington. Three others of our pickets on the outer post, intending to go to the rescue of their comrades, came in contact with the enemy's force, in which Thomas Murray was killed and Llewelyn Rhumer was severely wounded. The third, dropping upon the ground, escaped without injury, the enemy, in the excitement and darkness, passing over him. The trails of blood, discovered in the morning, showed that they had likewise suffered in the encounter.

The evidences on every hand pointed unmistakably to an early advance of the army. Inspections were careful and minute. All surplus baggage was sent to the rear, together with knapsacks and overcoats, the men retaining only their blankets. The Fourth Regiment was assigned to the First Brigade, Third Division* of McDowell's army. The division moved from camp by the Fairfax road, reaching Sangster's Station on Thursday evening. The enemy set fire to his stores and retreated, as the column advanced. Firing was heard in the direction of Blackburn's Ford, occasioned by Colonel Richardson's reconnaissance in that direction. On Friday the division moved to Centreville, where the entire army of McDowell lay encamped. On Saturday, the 20th of July, the question of muster out was freely agitated, the term of enlistment expiring on the following day. Desirous of retaining the regiment in his command till the anticipated battle should be fought, General McDowell issued an order, making the following appeal:

"The General commanding has learned with regret that the time of service of the Fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, is about to expire. The services of the regiment have been so important, its good conduct so general, its patience under privation so constant, its state of efficiency so good, that its departure at this time can only be considered an important loss to the army. Fully recognizing the right of the regiment to its discharge and payment, at the time agreed upon, the agreement of the government in this respect, the General commanding, nevertheless, requests the regiment to continue in service for a few days longer, pledging that the time of muster out of service shall not exceed two weeks. Such members of the regiment, as do not accede to this request will be placed under the command of proper officers, to be marched to the rear, mustered out of service, and paid, as soon as possible, after the expiration of the term of service."


Differences of opinion prevailed in the regiment upon the question of compliance with this request. While many were willing to re-enlist for two weeks longer, some were desirous of being mustered out in accordance with their contract with the government. When it was ascertained that unanimity of sentiment was not likely to be secured, it was decided by the commanding general that to break up the organization and to take a fragment of the regiment into battle would hot be prudent; orders were accordingly issued for its muster out of service. Several causes conspired to create an aversion to remaining. The regiment had been subject, during its service, to hardships which are, perhaps, inseparable from new and hasty organization, but which bore somewhat heavily upon the men, a detail of which it is unnecessary here to give. It was at a time, too, when great activity prevailed in the organization of new regiments for the three years' service, the officers of this regiment having already taken steps for making new organizations, in which considerable strife was manifested to get the trained men. Their decision was, accordingly, made more with reference to their own advantage and that of their officers than to any ulterior results.

General McDowell, when he found himself defeated in the battle which ensued, looking about for some causes to which he could attribute his failure, towards the close of his official report drags in this regiment for a share of blame, to whose service he had no more rightful claim, and whose conduct he could no more justly censure, than that of the regiment a week or a month earlier discharged.

The subsequent history of the men composing this regiment dispels any doubt that may, at the time, have been raised of the rectitude of their intentions Under the command of the lieutenant colonel, it marched to Washington, from whence it was taken by rail to Harrisburg, where it was soon after mustered out of service. But measures were immediately taken for the organization of new regiments, in which the men immediately enlisted for the war, and fully attested on the bloody fields of Fredericksburg and Antietam, and in numberless hard-fought battles of the war, their patriotism and their valor.

The colonel of the regiment (since major general), John F. Hartranft, desiring to remain with the army of McDowell, offered his services, and was assigned to duty on the staff of Colonel Franklin, commanding the First Brigade. In the terrible ordeal to which the division of Heintzelman was exposed, and when the regiments were broken and disorganized by the heat of the enemy's fire, Colonel Hartranft rendered invaluable aid in holding the men to their duty, and in rallying the regiments which had been thrown into confusion.

Captain Cook, of Company K, also remained, serving on the staff of Colonel David Hunter, and was officially commended for his gallantry.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

John F. Hartranft, col.; Edward Schall, col.; Edwin Schall, maj. Charles Hunsicker, adjt.; W.H. Yerkes, quartermaster; James B. Dunlap, surgeon Charles W. Rodgers, assist.-surgeon; T.W. McDaniels, chapl.; Martin Malony, sergt.-maj.; William M. Mintzer, quartermaster-sergt.

REGIMENTAL BAND.

D.H. Stubblebine (leader), Edmund Smith, Alfred Caldwell, Samuel Weis, George Evans, Daniel Ruch, Ephraim Hale, James Longan, Jacob F. Gauger, Alpheus Mixell, John Peterman, Andrew Peterman, Hammond Winters, William Gibson.


COMPANY A.

Recruited at Norristown, Montgomery Co. Mustered in April 20, 1861. William J. Bolton, capt.; Joseph K. Bolton, 1st lieutenant; William S. Ensley, 2nd lieutenant; Abraham L. Ortlip, 3d lieutenant; George W. Guss, 1st sergt.; John A. Wills, 2nd sergt.; Thomas B. Garner, 3d sergt.; William T. Roberts, 4th sergt.; Samuel S. Fries, 1st corp.; George Keen, 2nd Corp. C. Jones Iredell, 3d corp.; Charles A. Yost, 4th corp.; William A. Lambert, Samuel G. Doud, musicians.

Privates.

Samuel Aikens, John Brookes, Edwin Boyer, David D. Bath, Benjamin Banks, George T. Carpenter, George Culp, John Deem, James M. Doud, George W. Dehaven, William C. Ensley, William P. Earle, Jonathan T. Ely, Jonathan B. Ellis, Augustus Feather, John P. Fitzgerald, Charles H. Fitzgerald, Sylvester Garner, Theodore Gilbert, Abraham Hartranft, Joseph Holt, John Jordan, John M. Johnson, Major L. Jenkins, John Jones, Benjamin F. Knipe, Henry S. Kelley, John S. Kelley, Thomas Kelley, Abraham H. Kirkbride, John Kanause, George H. Kulp, Elijah Lewis, Michael Lightcap, John S. Moore, William L. Mather, Joseph R. Moyer, William McCoy, James McCartney, William B. Nungesser, Reese Pugh, John Richards, Robert Roberts, George M. Randall, Thomas J. Reiff, Jacob Robbins, John Shoffner, George W. Shoffmmer, John Y. Shainline, Mifflin Smedley, James C. Saylor, Josiah Saylor, Charles Sutch, Henry H. Shainline, Abraham B. Sutch, Jacob H. Stephens, James Spencer, Henry S. Smith, Adam R. Slemmer, Theodore Selah, Isaiah Smedley, Valentine Schrack, Mathias T. Server, William H. Shainline, Benjamin Thompson, Henry Tippen.



COMPANY B.

Recruited at Norristown, Montgomery Co. Mustered in April 20, 1861. Robert E. Taylor, capt.; Thomas Magee, 1st lieutenant; M. Robert McClennan, 2nd lieutenant; Lane S. Hart, 1st sergt.; William H. Griffith, 2nd sergt. Lorenzo D. Shearer, 3d sergt.; George M. Coler, 4th sergt.; Joseph C. Reed; David W. Roberts, 1st corp.; Thomas C. Simpson, 2nd corp.; John H. Kirkbride, 3d corp.; Israel W. Hart, 4th corp.

Privates.

George F. Altemus, Jacob Alker, James Ashburn, Howard Bruce, Jeremiah W. Buck, Isaiah B. Buck, Egbert B. Buzby, Jno M. Boyer, Harrison Bickle, Daniel W. Clemer, John H. Cou1ston, George N. Corson, Samuel H. Detweiler, Charles Earls, John E. Essick, Charles B. Evans, Thomas S. Ewing, Allen H. Fillman, J. Isett Freedley, Charles E. Frease, Jacob Fitzwater, Rotert Grimes, Ellridge G. Griffith, James W. Hahn, Philip Hahn, Jr., Ivens R. Hansell, James B. Heebner, John Heenan, Frank A. Hart, Edward Hocker, Henry C. Hughes, Davis Hunsicker, George W. Henderson, John H. Jacobs, Henry Jacobs, Ferdinand P. Kirkbride, Samuel A. Kugler, Charles A. Keyser, Daniel Linker, Enos Mowder, Samuel Markley, Samuel Miller, J. Benton Major, William Montgomery, Courtland McCarte, Marshall McCurte, Samuel C. McCombs, William Neiman, William W. Owen, John Rodenbaugh, George A. Reiff, Charles A. Reiff, William S. Rapine, Samuel P. Stephens, John Spencer, Adam J. Schrack, Samuel R. Shupe, Lewis J. Syckle, Samuel J. Shearer, Paul A. Smith, Barclay Thomas, John M.H. Tomlinson James H. Wilson, Benjamin Young.


COMPANY C.

Recruited at Pottstown, Montgomery Co. Mustered in April 20, 1861.

John R. Brooke, captain; William S. Hobert, first lieutenant; Joseph Umstead, second lieutenant; Charles Malsberger, first sergeant; William B. Stanford, second sergeant; Mahlon S. Ludwig, third sergeant; Henry F. Butz, fourth sergeant; Benjamin F. Guest, first corporal; John H. Root, second corporal; George Sheets, third corporal; William M. Rankin, fourth corporal; Edmund Guest, William Antrim, musicians.

Privates.

John Auchey, George W. Butz, Lewis H. Bickle, Octavius S. Bull, John A. Beadencup, Jacob Bower, Samuel Buckwalter, John Corbett, Esler G. Dawson, Samuel Dehart, Abraham Dearoff, Myers Daly, Jacob W. Dechant, James M. Engle, Jacob L. Fitz, Michael F. Fryer, Evan Fryer, Frank Fair, Paul Frick, David I. Geiger, Charles L. Geiger, William M. Hobart, Abraham Hesser, John Hendricks, John Heft, Albert Hoffman, Enos Hoffman, William Hunsicker, William Kirkpatrick, Abraham Kirst, John L. Kupp, Adam Lessig, Samuel Lacey, William G. Lesher, Washington H. Lachman, Thomas Mauger, Andrew Missimer, Jonah M. Neiman, Nathaniel Potts, William S. Potts, John T. Potts, David M. Phillips, John Reinard, Dewees W. Roberts, John J. Scholl, Peter E. Skean, Charles Simpkins, Joseph Spong, Jacob Schanely, George W. Seigfried, Charles C. Smith, John R. Sample, Rees B. Thompson, George Vandersycle, James Walters, Abraham H. Weir, Henry Wamback, William H. Willaner, William S. Wells, Daniel B. Weand, Isaac L. Yergey, William Yergey, Thomas Yergey, Leidv J. Yohn.


COMPANY D.

Recruited at Norristown, Montgomery Co. Mustered in April 20, 1861 Reuben T. Schall, captain; Charles Hansell, first lieutenant; David Schall, second lienenant; Hiram Lysinger, first sergeant; Samuel Painter, second sergeant; Samuel Fair, third sergeant; John Fair, fourth sergeant; Jesse S. Batchelder, first corporal; Andrew Fair, second corporal; Joseph Bell, third corporal; Henry Foreman, fourth corporal A.D. Earl, Adam Zinnel, musicians.

Privates.

John H. Bond, John Boaz, John Brant, John Beal, Francis Burk, Samuel Cloward, James Conway, Patrick Cumming, Irvin Craighton, A.P. Custer, Freeman Davis, Isaac Dehaven, John Dougherty, John Earl, John H. Fleck, James M. Griffith, Jacob Gauss, Joseph Garess, William Geist, James R. Griffith, Theodore Gratz, Charles Griffith, John Geyer, Joshua Hollowell, William Jenkins, Jesse Keeler, Samuel Kay, Thomas A. Kelly, James Kulp, David Lougherty, George Lightcap, Andrew Leedom, David B. Markley, Thomas McDuefus, Julia McCoy, Alexander McCrea, Samuel Mills, Harry McVaugh, Levi B. Nail, Harry Nail, Nathun Orner, John F. Parker, Samuel Peters, Thomas Smith, Thomas Shuck, Bernard Sherdin, Calvin Schall, Henry Stitler, James Seaman, William Stitch, Charles Stewart, William Shine, Owen Tompkins, Isaac Tolan, Jacob Tompkins, George Tippen, Arnold Vanfossen, Jr., Mills Williamson, Philip Wampold, John Wildsmith, Henry White, Charles A. Wentz, J.E. Wagner, A.G. Wright.


COMPANY E.

Recruited at Norristown, Montgomery Co. Mustered in April 20, 1861. George Amey, captain: Richard T. Stewart, first lieutenant; James P. Butler, second lieutenant; David Knipe, first sergeant; Henry Nuss, second sergeant; William Eastwood, third sergeant; John Gilligan, fourth sergeant; William R. Wager, first corporal; William Biggs, second corporal; George F. Fisher, third corporal; Charles Jones, fourth corporal; Thomas Lounck, John Childs, musicians.

Privates.

Samuel Augge, George W. Baker, Charles Barnes, George Bright, Jacob Basin, William Carey, John F. Carroll, Edwin C. Custard, Joseph Crady, Robert Docherdy, Michael Delaney, Thomes Doud, Denny Dimond, William Enos, John F. Fisher, Charles Ford, Jacob F. Fisher, Hiram C. Fisher, Henry Furlong, William Grew, Nathan Grew, Thomas Gardner, John Gardner, Joseph P. Hendricks, Isaac Hucheron, William Hallman, David Henan, James Hollinger, Benjamin Johnson, Owen Lear, Daniel Lysinger, Joseph Larrison, Thomas Lockard, Albert list, Charles K. Lookens, John McDaid, William McDaid, F. McFadden, Thomas McEwen, George W. Miller, Aaron Moore, Michael Mooney, Thomas Murray, Antrim Master, Jonas Moyer, Charles O'Neele, James Powers, John Quinn, William Quinn, David Reily,, Francis Ruch, Llewelyn Rhumer, Charles H. Rhumer, Mathias Shoemaker, John Smith, Elias Springer, Robert Steward, Francis Tomany, William Uncufter, Patrick Vaghn, Isaac Varney, George Workiser, John Welsh, John Williams.


COMPANY I.

Recruited at Norristown, Montgomery Co. Mustered in April 20, 1861. William Allabaugh, capt.; Lewis Ramsey, 1st lieutenant; Charles S. McGlathary, 2nd lieutenant; Joseph Rylands, 1st sergt.; Thomas Jones, 2nd sergt.; Daniel Streper, 3d sergt.; George Y. Hansell, 4th sergt. George H. Smith, 1st corp.; Charles Durham, 2nd corp.; John H. White, 3d corp.; Benjamin Uelele, 4th corp.; William Hinkle and Edwin R.W. Sickles, musicians.

Privates.

John Badman, William Barry, John Bennet, Edward Bonter, James H. Buck, Charles Carn, James Carter, Thomas Chilling, William R. Cox, Simon Clinberger, Harry Davis, Samuel Deen, George Dehaven, Henry Dehaven, Michael Dillon, John Dougherty, George Emory, George J. Eckhorn, Jacob Erney, Nathan Fornwalt, Jacob Fulner, Christian Geicel, Jacob W. Geiger, William M. Geiger, William R. Gilbert, Christian Gancer, Alexander Gotwalt, John Graham, Samuel Hallman, Jacob L. Hoover, Edward C. Jones, David Kane, Patrick Keven, John W. Lamsbach, William Lath, George Lowry, Sylvester Makens, Allen Martin, William H. Martin, George Mercer, John Meris, Hugh McClane, Nathan McColly, Joshua McCool, Patrick McDade, Jones Munshower, William B. Nichols, James Phillips, Abraham Printz, Nathan H. Ramsey, Andrew J. Reed, Charles Rodebaugh, George Rodebaugh, Samuel Rodebaugh, George K. Roberts, William Robinson, Patrick Rogan, David Schrack, J.W. Shuttleworth, Samuel Slingluff, Benjamin R. Still, William F. Thomas, Thomas B. Vanfossen, George W. Whishlar, George W. White.


COMPANY K.

Recruited at Norristown, Montgomery Co. Mustered in April 20, 1861. Walter H. Cook, capt.; Henry K. Weand, 1st lieutenant; Charles V. Fisher, 2nd lieutenant; David H. Connard, 1st sergt.; Noah B. Brown, 2nd sergt.; Peter A. Brown, 3d sergt.; Sidney Brown, 4th sergt.; Frank L. Wagner, 1st corp.; Joseph K. Corson, 2nd corp.; Frank Hart, 3d corp.; Daniel M. Yost, 4th corp.; William M. McGowen and Samuel Moore, musicians.

Privates.

Philip Badman, Silas Baker, Jonas Beckwith, George W. Bush, Bernard Canney, John A. Carr, Thomas N. Carr, George E. Chadwick, Isaac Conway, William Corner, Charles T. Dager, Reuben Dehaven, Henry Edwards, Augustus Fye, Francis Flanigan, James Gilmer, John Grundy, George Harkins, Samuel Hart, Joseph H. High, Richard Kelly, Enoch B. Kirby, George Kutz, Terance Landy, John Marple, Thomas Mars, Archibald McCorkle, Stephen McCloskey, William McGlathery, John McGowen, William McMain, James Maiden, John Miller, John Moore, Thomas Magee, John S. Nuss, William Ogden, John O'Neill, Joseph Palmer, Hiram Phipps, Stephen Phipps, James Pierce, William W. Potts, Allen Quarmby, Ivens Rambo, Nathaniel Rhoads, Robert W. Scarlett, Tobias Schmearer, Walter Scott, John Sheetz, Charles Sidders, David Signet, Richard Street, Charles Styer, John Styer, Jonathan Swallow, John Ward, William B. Weaver, Charles A. Weland, Clarence W. Wills, William W. Wills, Jr., Abraham Wood, James Wood.

NOTE. - "Colonel Hartranft, of the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment, accompanied me to the field as aid-de-camp. His services were exceedingly valuable to me, and he distinguished himself in his attempts to rally the regiments, which hod been thrown into confusion." - Col. W.B. Franklin's official report, First Brigade, Third Division, sMontgomerys i. vol. ii., "Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies," p. 406.

For the greater convenience of reference, the history of the military organizations identified with Montgomery County will be continued in the chronological order of their formation and departure for the seat of the war. Where companies have been organized and become attached to regiments, it is due to those accredited to the county that an account of their services be related, as the same has been officially preserved in the history of the regiments of which they were a part. They appear as follows:





The Forty-Fourth Regiment (First Pennsylvania Cavalry)

44th Regiment


entered the service for the term of three years. Company B was recruited in Montgomery County, and was trained for the distinguished service which it experienced by Colonel George D. Bayard,* a graduate of West Point United States Military Academy, class of 1856. He early distinguished himself as a fearless cavalry leader, and would undoubtedly have become a division and corps commander had he not fallen mortally wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., in December, 1862, while in command of a brigade of cavalry. Of the twenty-two regiments of cavalry organized in Pennsylvania during the great Rebellion, not one regiment was wholly recruited and accredited to a single city or county. Men volunteering for this arm of the service were of a class accustomed to the use of horses or had a fondness for them.

Some excellent troops were formed of young horsemen from our large cities and inland towns, but most of the companies were recruited in the country districts. As a general rule, the men of this arm of the service were of the best material and made excellent soldiers. But in the mass of men who were hastily recruited and sent forward as substitutes in the latter part of 1863 to 1865 there were many unfitted for the cavalry service. Under the rules and regulations of the War Department in force at the time, the maximum number of men for a troop or company of cavalry was one hundred. Twelve companies composed a regiment. These companies were further organized into squadrons of two companies each, and the six squadrons were formed into three battalions. Three regiments generally formed a brigade, though sometimes four and even five regiments were united in the same brigade, but this was only in cases where commands had become decimated. Two brigades generally formed a division, and the three divisions operating with the Army of the Potomac constituted the cavalry corps. This branch of the public service was first organized by Major-General Joseph Hooker when he assumed command of the Army of the Potomac in the winter of 1863.**

The artillery assigned to the cavalry were mounted and known as "Horse Artillery," and, with the exception of Martin's Independent Battery of New York, were detached from the regulars. The proportion of artillery was one battery to each brigade. The guns used were twelve-pounder Napoleons and the Griffin six-pounder rifled guns. Most of the latter were made at Phoenixville, Pa. The cavalry were armed with sabre, Colt's revolving pistol and Sharp's carbine. Many of the troops in 1864 were supplied with the Spencer carbine, "seven-shooters." They were the most destructive arm of the kind in use. In the campaigns of 1864 -65 the cavalry frequently fought dismounted, and owing to the superior arms in use, they were uniformly victorious, inflicting a heavy loss of life upon the enemy. Company B of the First Pennsylvania Cavalry was the pioneer organization of horsemen from Montgomery County. It was composed of a class of men representing the intelligence and patriotism of the Schuylkill Valley, and left the county under the command of Captain Owen Jones, of Lower Merion. The regiment was one of the most distinguished of Pennsylvania Reserves, and always ranked among the best in the famous cavalry corps of the Army of the Potomac. The public service of the regiment from its muster in to the surrender of Lee at Appomatox was fully shared by Company B. It is therefore due to the men who composed it, and their descendants, that the essential facts of history connected with the regimental organization be preserved.



COLONEL OWEN JONES, who, from early manhood until his death, was one of the most prominent and honored citizens of Montgomery County and of the State of Pennsylvania, was a son of Jonathan and Mary (Thomas) Jones, and a descendant of Edward Jones, who was a native of Wales, and came thence to Pennsylvania nearly two centuries ago, settling on lands purchased from William Penn and which forms part of the estate that has been held in the Jones family from that time until the present. A larger portion of the property which descended through successive generations to Colonel Owen Jones came into possession of his ancestors through the marriage of a son of the original settler, Edward Jones, with a daughter of Thomas Wynne, Speaker of the first Colonial Assembly of Pennsylvania, who took up lands adjoining those of Edward Jones. By that marriage the Wynne and Jones lands became united in one estate, which, in honor of the Wynne family, received the name which it still bears, - Wynnewood.

In the Wynnewood mansion, on this estate, Owen Jones was born, December 29, 1819. On reaching the proper age, and having passed through a preparatory course of study, he entered the University of Pennsylvania, where, in due time, he was graduated, and commenced the study of law in the office of William M. Meredith, of Philadelphia. At the conclusion of his law course he was admitted to the bar in Philadelphia and soon afterwards (May 19, 1842) was also admitted to practice in Montgomery County. But having a preference for the pursuit of agriculture, rather than for the practice of his profession, he gave his attention chiefly to the former, becoming deeply interested in the raising of fine stock and in everything tending to the promotion of improvement in methods of farming. In 1845 he became the purchaser of property in West Philadelphia belonging to the Warner estate, which afterwards had a remarkable rise in value, and became known as the "drove-yard property."

In 1856 Mr. Jones received the Democratic Congressional nomination for the Fifth District, which then embraced Montgomery County and some of the northern wards of Philadelphia. He was elected and served in Congress from December, 1857, to March 4, 1859. Prior to his election to Congress he had served, under appointment by Judge Thomas Burnside, as member of a commission charged with the duty of adjusting the basis of State taxation for the district composed of the counties of Montgomery and Bucks.

On the breaking out of the great war of the Rebellion, in April, 1861, he immediately became prominent as one of the most earnest and active supporters of the government and the Union. Under the legislative act of May 15th of that year, providing for the formation of the "Reserve Volunteer Corps of the Commonwealth," to include one regiment of mounted men, he at once commenced the raising of a company of cavalry, which he recruited almost entirely at his own private expense. The company, which was made up of men of Lower Merion and adjoining townships, was soon filled and moved to the rendezvous at Camp Curtin, Harrisburg, where it became Company B of the First Pennsylvania Cavalry. It was afterwards designated as the Forty-fourth Regiment of the State volunteer forces and placed under command of Colonel George D. Bayard. Prior to this (August 5, 1861) Captain Owen Jones, of Company B, had been promoted to the grade of major. In September the regiment moved from Camp Curtin to Tenallytown, Md.,whence, on the 10th of October, it crossed the Potomac River into Virginia. A few weeks later it first saw actual service in the battle of Dranesville, where it took a leading part in the attack, which resulted in the complete rout of the enemy.

On the 3d of January, 1862, upon the resignation of Lieutenant-Colonel Jacob Higgins, Major Owen Jones was advanced to the higher grade, and in the following May he was promoted to the colonelcy of the regiment, Colonel Bayard having been made a brigadier-general.

While under command of Colonel Jones the First Cavalry performed severe and continuous service, and fought gallantly in a great number of engagements, among the principal of which were those of Hartwood Church, Woodstock, Harrisonburg, Port Republic, Front Royal, Cross-Keys, Grovton, Robertson's River, Strasburg, Cedar Mountain, Chantilly, Second Bull Run, Falmouth and finally the great battle of Fredericksburg (December 11 to 13, 1862), where Colonel Jones, acting as brigadier-general, commanded a full cavalry brigade, occupying a position on the extreme left and in the advance of General Franklin's corps. In that battle General Bayard was killed.

In January, 1863, about one month after the battle of Fredericksburg, Colonel Jones, with his regiment, took part in the famous, but profitless, "Mud March" of General Burnside's army up the Rappahannock, and then, after three days of severest, toil, along impassable roads, back to their former position. This was the last of the military operations in which Colonel Jones participated. On the 30th of January, 1863, he resigned his commission and left the service. To his country he had done his whole duty, and had done it well. From the officers and men who served under him he had won the full measure of that respect and love, which soldiers always give to a brave, generous and humane commander. On all the muster-rolls of Pennsylvania, or of the great Union army, there could not be found the name of a truer patriot or a more gallant and conscientious officer than Colonel Owen Jones.

Returning from the army to his beautiful home at Wynnewood, Colonel Jones resumed the peaceful vocations which had been interrupted by his departure for the field of war. In these pursuits and in the enjoyments of domestic life he continued through a further period of nearly fifteen years, which brought him to the close of his honorable and useful career. Early in the evening of December 25, 1878, he set out from his home alone and on foot, intending, in company with his near neighbor, Mr. Wister, to spend the evening in a social way at the house of their mutual friend, Dr. George Gerhard. On leaving home he directed his coachman to call for him at the doctor's house at ten o'clock. At that hour the man went with the carriage, according to directions, but, on reaching Dr. Gerhard's, was told that Colonel Jones had not been there. He then proceeded to the house of Mr. Wister, where he inquired for the colonel, but received the same answer. A search was then made along the way that Colonel Jones was supposed to have taken, and about an hour later his body was found, lying face downward, lifeless and cold, within fifty yards of Dr. Gerhard's residence. His death had evidently been instantaneous and the result of apoplexy. The remains were interred in the family vault at Laurel Hill. The funeral was attended by a large concourse of people, among whom were a number of those who had been his companions-in-arms and many of the leading men of Pennsylvania. His death was deeply mourned by all who knew him, and by none outside the family more sincerely than by the worthy poor, to whom he had always been a friend and liberal benefactor.

Colonel Owen Jones was married, November 4, 1841, to Mary, daughter of Isaac W. Roberts. Their children were four in number, - Emily R., Owen Glendower, Annie and J. Aubrey Jones, the last-named being now the only survivor. He resides with his mother in the Wynnewood family mansion, where his father was born and which was his home during all the years of his life.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

George D. Bayard, col., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; wounded at Dranesyule, Va., Nov. 22, 1861; promoted to brig.- gen. May 5, 1862; killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862.

Owen Jones, col., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. B to maj. Aug. 5, 1861; to lieutenant-col. Oct. -, 1861; to col. May 5, 1862; res. Jan. 30, 1863.

John P. Taylor, col., mustered in Aug. 10, 1861; promoted from Capt. Co. C to lieutenant col. Sept. 15, 1862; to col. March 2, 1863; to brevet brig.-gen. Aug. 4, 1865; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

Jacob Higgins, lieutenant-col., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. G Aug. 18, 1861; res. Oct. 8, 1861.

Sylv. D. Barrows, lieutenant-col., mustered in Aug. 11, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. D to maj. Nov. 15, 1861; to lieutenant-col. May 5, 1862; res. Sept. 15, 1862.

David Gardner, lieutenant-col., mustered in Sept. 27, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. U to maj. Nov. 23, 1862; to lieutenant-col. Feb. 10, 1863 must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

Thomas S. Richards, maj., mustered in Aug. 5, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. M May 5, 1862; res. Nov. 22, 1862.

Josiah H. Ray, maj., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from Co. F March 1, 1862; res. Feb. 23, 1863.

William T. McEwen, maj., mustered in Aug. 10, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. C Feb. 23, 1863; wounded at Brandy Station, Va., June 9, 1863 res. Oct. 17, 1863.

Richard J. Falls, maj., mustered in Jan. 3, 1862; wounded July 28. 1864 transferred to batt. Sept. 3, 1864; com. lieutenant-col., Nov. 11, 1864 not mustered; discharged Jan. 3, 1865.

James M. Gaston, maj., mustered in Aug. -, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. I March 1, 1863; must. out Aug., 1864.

Charles C. Townsend, adjt., mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; promoted from hosp. stew. Nov. 22, 1862; res. June 14, 1863.

William P. Lloyd, adjt., mustered in Sept. 1, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. E Sept. 1, 1863; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

C.L. Buffington, bvt. adjt., mustered in Aug. 12, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. E to Batt. adjt. Feb. 19, 1862; must. out Sept. 10, 1862.

William S. Foster, bvt. adjt., mustered in Sept. 6, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. K March 1, 1862; must. out Sept. 9, 1862.

William Bayard, bvt. adjt., mustered in March 1, 1862; discharged Sept. 1, 1862. Job H. Cole, bvt. adjt., mustered in Aug. 5, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. Co. M May 5, 1862; must. out Sept. 11, 1862.

Richard R. Corson, q.m , mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. B to quartermaster Sept. 17, 1861; to Capt. and assist. quartermaster May 23, 1862.

George H. Baker, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from corp. Co. B to quartermaster sergt. Sept. 28, 1861; to quartermaster May 5, 1862; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

William Shadelman, c.s., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. B to quartermaster-sergt. May 5, 1862; to 1st lieutenant and c.s. Oct. 22, 1862; res. Jan. 28, 1863.

Henry A. Wood, c.s., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from private Co. F to com. sergt. June 22, 1862; to 1st lieutenant and c.s. Jan. 27, 1863; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

David Stanton, surgeon, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; promoted to surgeon U.S. Regiment army Nov. 24, 1862.

Gurdon B. Hotchkin, surgeon, mustered in Dec. 4, 1861; promoted from assist. surgeon Nov. 24, 1862; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

J.B. Finney, assist. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; res. Sept., 1861.

Samuel Alexander, assist. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; killed at Dranesville, Va., Nov. 26, 1861.

S.W.H. Calver, assist. surgeon, mustered in June , 1862; res. Aug. 2, 1862.

Hiram N. Kelly, assist. surgeon, mustered in Dec. 17, 1862; res. Jan. 21, 1863.

L.E. Atkinson, assist. surgeon, mustered in Jan. 24, 1863; transferred to batt. Sept. 3, 1864; discharged Sept. 5, 1864.

R.H. Tuft, assist. surgeon, mustered in July 6, 1863; transferred to batt. Sept. 3, 1864; and to 2nd Regiment Prov. Cav. June 17, 1865.

J. Harvey Beale, chaplain, mustered in Sept. 1, 1861; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

Jacob Wolf, vet. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 13, 1861; promoted from private Co I 1, 1863; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

George W. Seigrist, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 10, 1861; promoted from quartermaster sergt. Co. C to sergt.-maj. Sept., 1861; to 2nd lieutenant Co. I Nov. 23, 1861.

Henry C. Beamer, sergt.-maj.; promoted to sergt.-maj. Feb. 17, 1862; to 1st lieutenant Co. G July 17, 1862.

William McCue, sergt.-maj.; appointed sergt.-maj. May 8, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Sept 29, 1862.

George J. Geiser, sergt.-maj.; promoted to sergt.-maj. Sept. 29, 1862; to 2nd lieutenant Co. G April 12, 1863.

John Hamilton, sergt.-maj., mustered in July 25, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. A May 1, 1863; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

George W. Fincher, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in July 30, 1861; promoted from private Co. L Nov. 1, 1862; transferred to batt. Sept. 3, 1864; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. L, batt., Sept. 13, 1864; to 1st lieutenant Co. F, batt., March 19, 1865 must. out by consolidation June 20, 1865; veteran.

John McCahan, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861 promoted from private Co. G Feb. 28, 1862; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

Joseph Deveney, hosp. steward; appointed hosp. steward Sept. 6, 1861 transferred; not on muster-out roll.

Ernest Conzler, hosp. steward must. out Aug. 28, 1861; promoted from private Co. G Oct., 1861; transferred to U.S. regular army Nov. 24, 1862.

Charles Gardner, hosp. steward, mustered in Oct. 20, 1862; promoted from private Co. G Oct. 23, 1862; transferred to batt. Sept. 3, 1864.

William P. Lloyd, hosp. steward, mustered in Sept. 1, 1861; promoted from private Co. G Dec. 18, 1862; to 1st lieutenant Co. E March 22, 1863.

William J. Jackman, hosp. steward, mustered in July 25, 1861; pro from sergt. Co. A Feb. 25, 1863; must. out with regiment Sept. 9, 1864.

Thomas R. Starer, bugler, mustered in Aug. 21, 1861; promoted from corp. Co. I Oct. 16, 1861; discharged by order of War Dept. Oct. 1, 1862.

James P. Landis, bugler, mustered in Aug. 10, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. C May 1, 1863; wounded June 9, 1863; transferred to batt. Sept. 3, 1864; must. out by special order June 20, 1865; veteran.

John W. Forney, saddler, mustered in July 25, 1861; transferred to batt. Sept. 3, 1864; must. out by special order June 20, 1865; veteran.


COMPANY B.

Recruited at Athensville, Montgomery Co.

Owen Jones, capt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted to maj. Aug. 5, 1861.

Jacob L. Statlelman, capt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant Aug. 8, 1861; res. March 26, 1862.

Joseph C. Roberts, capt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Nov. 25, 1861; to 1st lieutenant Dec. 30, 1861; to capt. March 26, 1862:  res. May 8, 1862.

William Litzenberg, capt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from sergt. May 20, 1862; wounded at Deep Bottom. Va., July 28, 1864; discharged Sept. 9, 1864, exp. of term.

Theodore Streck, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. to 1st lieutenant Aug. 8, 1861; to Capt. Co. H Nov. 25, 1861.

Richard R. Corson, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 1st lieutenant and quartermaster Sept. 17, 1861.

John Kline, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; pro from 2nd to 1st lieutenant Nov. 25, 1861; res. Dec. 30, 1861.

William Buzby, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from corp. to 1st sergt.; to 2nd lieutenant Jan. 3, 1862; to 1st lieutenant March 26, 1862; died at Washington, D.C., May 1, 1864.

George H. Baker, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from corp. to quartermaster sergt. Sept. 28, 1861; to 1st lieutenant and quartermaster May 5, 1862.

Robert S. Lawsha, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from sergt. March 26, 1862; wounded May 28, 1864; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

John H. Bevan, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861: promoted from corp. to 1st sergt. April 1, 1862; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

W.F. Chrisman, quartermaster sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted to corp.; to quartermaster sergt. Feb. 1, 1863; wounded at Culpepper, Va., Sept. 13, 1863; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Daniel H. Titlow, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from Corp. to sergt. April 5, 1862; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Lewis M. Thomas, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 1, 1863,

Adolphus S. Edler, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Martin Mars, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from corp. to sergt. Jan. 14, 1862; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Lem. A. Patterson, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted to sergt.; discharged on surgeon certif. March 20, 1863.

Joseph Price, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from corp. to sergt. Feb. 1, 1863; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

David W. Terrence, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted from corp. I wounded May 25, 1863; discharged on surgeon certif. July 8, 1861.

John J. Creighton, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted to sergt.; transferred to batt., 1st Pa. Cav.; veteran.

Samuel Jago, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted to sergt.; transferred to batt, Sept. 9, 1864; must. out as sergt. Co. M, batt., June 20, 1865; veteran.

George L. Lyle, sergt., mustered in Aug 8, 1861; promoted to sergt.; killed at Malvern Hill, Va., July 28, 1864; veteran.

William Stadelman, sergt., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; promoted to sergt.; to quartermaster sergt. May 5, 1862.

John Anderson, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861.; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct 9, 1861.

Adou. J. Stanley, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon Certif. Jan. 19, 1863.

John R. Styer, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; killed at Hawes' Shop, Va. May 28, 1864.

William H. Edler, corp., mustered in Aug. 28, 1862; wounded June 21 1864; transferred to batt., 1st Pa. Cav.

George B. Rambo, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Crawford Yocum, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Kline A. Graver, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

William H. Ramsay, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept 9, 1864.

Joel L. Davis, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Nark R. Hagner, corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Henry H. Pyott, Corp., mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Henry Z. Lair, bugler, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; transferred to brigade band Jan. 1, 1863.

Franklin Snyder, bugler, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Morris M. Mattson, bugler, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Privates.

Théo. T. Ashenfelter, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 26, 1863.

William Adair, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864; must. out in Co. M., batt., June 6, 1865.

Lorenzo D. Black, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sep 9, 1864.

Allen L. Bevan, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Jacob S. Bisson, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

William H. Bowden, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. 1862.

John Black, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864; veteran.

Charles Bennet, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864; veteran.

Francis Blehl, mustered in Oct. 15, 1861; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864.

Amos Baxter, mustered in Aug. 3, 1863; transferred to U.S. navy July 5, 1864.

Fleming Campbell, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Patrick Connell, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; wounded in Pa. July 5, 1863, and at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Edgar W. Collins, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Joseph S. Cornman, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

James Conrad, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. 1862.

Charles Cramer, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Peter Davis, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Charles Davison, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Elisha P. Davis, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan; 4, 1862.

Jacob H. Dettra, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 3, 1863.

John Dales, mustered in Sept. 6, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. 1862.

John L. Dougherty, mustered in May 25, 1863; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 8, 1863.

Charles Ford, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 4, 1862.

Chalkley F. Greger, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Alex. Gotwalls, mustered in Aug. 8. 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. March 20, 1863.

John S. Grant, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Jacob W. Haines, mustered in Aug. 8. 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Thomas P. Hoffman, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

William S. Hampton, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Matthias Hafner, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

William Hutchinson, mustered in Jan. 17, 1864; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864.

Samuel A. Haws, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; killed at Hawes' Shop, Va., May 28, 1864.

George Hampton, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; deserted Nay 25, 1862.

Enos Jacobs, mustered in Aug. 1, 1863; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864.

Justice W. Lutz, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Perry H. Levering, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Robert Lowry, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864; veteran.

James McFague, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Lewis Moore, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; wounded July 28, 1864; absent at muster out.

Washington Miller, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 4, 1862.

Nathan Miller, mustered in Aug. 9, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 4, 1862.

James McClellan, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; disch, on surgeon certif. 1862.

Joseph F. Moore, mustered in July 23, 1862; wounded at Culpepper Sept. 13, 1863 and Barker's Mills June 2, 1864; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864; promoted to 1st lieutenant Co. A, batt., Dec. 13, 1864; must. out June 29, 1865.

Henry C. Moore, mustered in Feb. 27, 1864; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864.

Matthew Michael, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864; veteran.

Thomas Mylan, mustered in May 13, 1863; transferred to batt. Sept. 9. 1864.

John Miles, Jr., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864; discharged in Co. M, batt., May 27, 1865.

Robert Maxwell, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; died at Alexandria, Va., April 4, 1862; burial record Dec. 16, 1863, grave 1192.

Howard McAfee, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; killed at Auburn Mills, Va., Oct. 14. 1863.

Philip A. Mower, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died July 3, 1864, of wounds received at Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864; buried at Philadelphia.

Conrad Maiser, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

James J. McFayne, not on muster-out roll.

John O'Connel, mustered in March 28, 1864; transferred date and place unknown.

Evan J. Paxson, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864.

John Quinn, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Charles Quinley, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 20, 1862.

William H. Rhoads, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

John Ritter, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Charles Robinson, mustered in March 16, 1864; transferred to batt. Sept. 9, 1864.

George Rodebaugh, must, in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. 1862.

Wesley A. Solely, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Edward B. Smoyer, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Joseph Smith, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Michael B. Staub, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

Isaac W. Smith, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. April 15, 1864.

Theodore Shaffer, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., Oct. 17, 1861.

John Smith, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; killed at Auburn Mills, Va., Oct. 14, 1863.

Samuel S. Staiger, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861.

Thomas Swift, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

Hamilton Vaughn, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

John V. Vanderslice, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. April 20, 1863.

Edward J. Warnock, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.

John Yocumn, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; killed at Hawes' Shop, Va., May 28, 1864.

George W. Zinn, mustered in Aug. 8, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 9, 1864.



Fifty-first Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

51st Regiment

- Some time previous to the first battle of Bull Run Colonel Hartranft, who commanded a regiment in the three months' service, applied for and received authority to recruit one for the three years' service. Calling about him many of his old officers and men, the ranks of the new regiment were soon filled with a body rarely excelled for qualities essential to good soldier. With the exception of a few enlistments, Companies A, C, D, F and I were recruited in Montgomery County; E, H and K in Union and Snyder; G in Centre; and B in Northampton. The companies rendezvoused at Camp Curtin, and the regiment was organized by the selection of the following officers: John F. Hartranft, of Montgomery County, colonel; Thomas S. Bell, of Chester County, lieutenant-colonel; Edwin Schall, of Montgomery County, major.

On the morning of the 18th of November the regiment left Camp Curtin, and proceeded by rail to Annapolis, Md., where, beneath the venerable elms of Saint John's College, it was for the first time formed in line, its details made and its arms stacked. Burnside's expedition to North Carolina was now being fitted out, and the best drilled and most reliable of the volunteer regiments were selected for that service. The Fifty-first Pennsylvania was early designated as one. Upon its arrival at Annapolis it was at first quartered in the buildings of the college, and subsequently went into camp on the old French burying-ground. On the 1st of December the camp was moved two miles beyond the city, and for six weeks it was subjected to continuous and laborious drill, during which its efficiency and discipline were rapidly improved, and a foundation laid for its future renown. In the final organization of the corps it was assigned to Reno's brigade.***

On the 6th of January, 1862, the regiment embarked, and on the 9th the fleet, in three squadrons, set sail from Annapolis, and with sealed orders passed out to sea. No sooner had it reached the open ocean than it was overtaken by a succession of violent storms. It seemed as though a tempest had been lurking in the waste of waters ready to burst upon it the moment it should appear. For nearly two weeks, staggering beneath the giant waves, it was swept about at the mercy of the elements. Braving successfully the tempest, it finally passed Hatteras Inlet, and came to anchor in Pamlico Sound. On the morning of the 5th of February the flag-ship "Philadelphia" was anxiously watched as it moved, followed by the fleet, and it soon became evident that Roanoke Island was the destination. At early dawn on the 7th a landing was effected and the movement commenced. The enemy was found strongly posted in earthworks on the northwestern corner of the island, nearly surrounded by an impenetrable swamp, approached in front by a single causeway, which was swept by the guns of the fort. Upon arriving at the edge of the swamp, Reno's brigade was sent to the left to cut off the enemy's retreat south, while Foster was directed to penetrate the swamp to the right of the road, and attack the enemy upon that flank. Hartranft soon found his way completely blocked, and returned upon the track of Foster, leaving two companies of the Fifty-first, which had the advance, still groping in the mire. But before he had reached the lines Foster had already opened upon the enemy with infantry and artillery, and as the regiment came into position on the right of the line, Foster ordered a final charge, and the enemy was driven from his works, and fled in confusion. The demonstration upon the left seemed to heighten the confusion, as he anticipated that his way of retreat was effectually broken. A hot pursuit was immediately made, and the entire force, with numerous heavy guns and small-arms, was captured.

On the 3d of March the regiment embarked for the expedition to Newbern, and on the 4th changed its muskets for Enfield rifles. The fleet sailed on the 11th, and entered the Neuse River on the 12th, anchoring off Slocum's Creek, fifteen miles from Newbern, where, on the following day, the regiment debarked. A portion, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Bell, was detailed to assist in moving the artillery. The rain was descending in torrents, and the roads were soon trodden into a stiff mud, which rendered the movement of the pieces next to impossible. Many of the men lost their shoes, and went into battle on the following day barefoot. But without faltering or pausing by the way, they toiled on over the weary miles, and brought up the pieces in time for the attack. For this important service General Burnside personally thanked Lieutenant-Colonel Bell. In the meantime Colonel Hartranft, with the remaining companies, pushed on with the advance column. Upon its arrival in front of the enemy's earth-works dispositions for attack were made, Foster occupying the right, Reno the left and Parke in support upon the centre. The enemy's line upon the left was masked by timber, and in the thick fog which prevailed the extent of his works was undiscovered. They proved to be of great strength, consisting of "thirteen finished redans" bristling with cannon, protected in front "by an almost impassable morass filled with fallen timber,"(4*) and stretching away far beyond the railroad, where his right was supposed to rest. Foster attacked upon his left; but the enemy concentrating his strength, proved too much for him.

As soon as he could gain his position on the left Reno attacked, and the battle soon became general, raging with great fury for three and a half hours. The Fifty-first had been held in support, and though exposed to a severe fire had not been allowed to return a single shot. General Reno becoming impatient at the delay and at the losses he was sustaining, ordered up Colonel Hartranft for the decisive charge. Forming within a short distance of the rebel intrenchrnents, the regiment was led forward through the ranks of the Fifty-first New York, which cheered the column as it passed to a little hill beyond. General Reno in person, his face beaming with an expression seen only in battle, ordered the charge. With determined valor the regiment rushed down a ravine choked with felled timber, up the opposite bank and, without a falter, carried the redan in front, planting the old flag upon the ramparts. "All this," says General Reno, in his official report, "was gallantly executed, and the enemy fled precipitately from all their intrenchments. Some fifty prisoners were captured in these works, many severely wounded. Upon reaching the rebel intrenchments I was rejoiced to see our flag waving along the entire line of the enemy's works," After setting fire to the railroad bridge and a number of factories, the rebels abandoned Newbern.

Detachments were frequently sent out by General Burnside to reconnoitre and hold important points upon the coast. One was intrusted to Colonel Hartranft, who moved with his regiment into the interior and acquired valuable information. On the 16th of April a force was sent out consisting of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania, Ninth and Eighty-ninth New York, Sixth New Hampshire and the Twenty-first Massachusetts, which proceeded by transports to a point four miles below Elizabeth City, where it landed. Pushing inland about twenty miles, the weary troops came upon the enemy strongly posted. Two companies of the Fifty-first, A and F, Captains Boulton and Hart, were considerably in advance of the main column, and when they had arrived within an eighth of a mile of the rebel line they were suddenly opened upon from the enemy's guns. They were ordered to shelter themselves as best they could and to hold their position. General Reno now led the Twenty-first Massachusetts and the balance of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania through the woods to the right, bringing them into position upon the enemy's left flank, where they immediately opened fire. In the meantime the Ninth New York had taken position on the enemy's left centre, and had prematurely charged upon his guns. The ground was open and, being fearfully exposed, the Ninth was repulsed with considerable loss. The Sixth New Hampshire advanced upon the left, and, with the two companies of the Fifty-first holding the road, kept the enemy well employed upon that part of the line. The Fifty-first had now turned his left flank and was pouring in most deadly volleys.
"In the mean time,"
says General Reno,
"the Fifty-first Pennsylvania and the Twenty-first Massachusetts kept up an incessant fire upon the rebels, who had now withdrawn their artillery and had commenced to withdraw in good order. The Sixth New Hampshire had steadily advanced in line to the left of the road, and when within about two hundred yards poured in a most deadly volley, which completely demoralized the enemy and ended the battle. Our men were so completely fagged out by the intense heat and their long march that we could not pursue them. The men rested under arms until about ten o'clock P. M., when I ordered a return to our boats, having accomplished the principal object of the expedition, conveying the idea that the entire Burnside expedition was marching upon Norfolk."
The loss in the regiment was three killed and twenty-one wounded. The brigade was here commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Bell, and the regiment by Major Schall. On the 30th of June the regiment embarked for Fortress Monroe, but was detained until the 5th of July, when it set sail with the rest of the command, and arrived on the 8th. Here General Burnside commenced organizing the Ninth Corps, destined to win an enviable place in the national armies, and the regiment was assigned to the Second Brigade of the Second Division, composed of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania, Fifty-first New York and the Twenty-first Massachusetts, commanded by General Edward Ferrero.

On the 12th of August Burnside hastened with his command to the support of Pope, and landed at Fredericksburg, whence he pushed forward two divisions to Cedar Mountain, where they formed a junction with General McDowell. The enemy had already made his appearance on the Rapidan, and Ferrero's brigade, under Colonel Hartranft, was sent to guard the fords from Mitchell's Station to Raccoon Ford. Lee's columns soon after arrived in force on the opposite bank, and began to press heavily to gain a crossing, when the brigade was withdrawn, and returning through Stevensburg, recrossed the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford. Four companies of the Fifty-first were detailed for the rearguard, and held the enemy at bay until so far separated from the main body as to excite serious apprehension for their safety; but they succeeded in bringing in the gun with which they were entrusted and crossed the river in safety losing only a few stragglers. Pope's army, maneuvering for several days, finally formed in line on the old Bull Run battle-ground. Kearny held the right, with Reno on his left. Several battMontgomerys were posted on a commanding ridge, and away to the right was a wood in which the enemy was concentrated in heavy force. The Fifty-first supported these battMontgomerys. On the afternoon of the first day of the battle, the 29th, Lieutenant-Colonel Bell, with a portion of the regiment, was detailed to advance to the picket line in Kearny's front, and remained in this position until the morning of the second day, when it rejoined the regiment, which had been withdrawn during the night. Towards evening our forces, having been driven back, began to move from the field. The line of retreat was along the Centreville road to the right of the position held by Graham's battery. This road was soon completely blocked with the artillery and trains, and much confusion prevailed.

It was a critical moment. The enemy, exulting in his successes, was pushing on to break in upon the column while impeded by its trains, and to crush it in its crippled condition by a single blow. Graham's pieces were admirably posted for its protection, and were already dealing their death-laden volleys upon the advancing foe; but should his supports fail him, his guns would be lost, and our whole left flank exposed. Ferrero saw the necessity of holding these guns at all hazards and of keeping them in full play. Undaunted by the masses of the foe hurled against him, he clung to the ground, and poured in double-shotted canister and rapid rounds of musketry until the enemy's lines were broken and driven in confusion. Again and again they returned to the contest with fresh troops and with renewed zeal; but no valor could withstand the shock of Ferrero's column, and the enemy finally retired, leaving our lines intact and our trains safe. Ferrero, with the Twenty-first Massachusetts, now moved off, and had become separated from the rest of his brigade. The command of the two remaining regiments devolved on Colonel Hartranft.

Retiring across Bull Run, the two regiments filed into the fields to the right of the pike, and bivouacked for the night. In the morning they moved on to Centreville, and rejoined the army. It was soon after discovered that the rebels were in motion to strike the Union column by a movement upon its right and cut off its retreat. Reno's corps was immediately put in motion, with the cavalry in advance, and was soon joined by Stevens and Kearny. Hartranft had the rear of the column, and was moving with two battMontgomerys, though under no orders to support them, when he suddenly found himself confronting the enemy. The two armies were moving on divergent roads, and the lines were here first struck. Seeing that these battMontgomerys were in peril, he instantly ordered them into a commanding position on the left of the road, and drove back the foe. It was nightfall, and a terrible thunder-storm prevailed; but Kearny and Stevens and Reno, three impetuous leaders, immediately forming, moved upon the foe, and fought in the darkness. They knew nothing of his strength and little of the ground, and contended to a great disadvantage; but the enemy was beaten back, which was the principal point, though Kearny and Stevens both yielded up their lives.

At his own request Pope was now relieved of the command of the Army of the Potomac, and McClellan was restored. On the 3rd of September the Ninth Corps moved through Washington, and on the 11th reached New Market, on the Maryland campaign. The passage of the Monocacy was not disputed. On the 12th the command entered Frederick, and had a brisk skirmish with the Cavalry, which was covering the withdrawal of the rebel army, now concentrating in the passes of the South Mountain, which it was determined to hold. Before reaching the mountain Ferrero's brigade moved by a country road leading up to the summit on the left of the Sharpsburg pike. Upon encountering the enemy's lines the Seventeenth Michigan, a new regiment, full of enthusiasm, but little schooled in those cardinal virtues of the soldier imparted by veteran discipline, made a most gallant charge diagonally across the road from left to right, in the face of murderous fire, which swept the ranks at every step, and soon disappeared in the woods beyond. General Reno coming up soon after, and supposing that his regiment had established a line in the woods and was holding the ground it had so gallantly won, ordered Colonel Hartranft to lead his regiment across the open field in the rear of the supposed line, and close up to the edge of the woods. While the regiment was thus moving, and was stretched out upon the march unsuspicious of danger, the enemy suddenly opened upon it from the wood a most withering fire. The Seventeenth Michigan had advanced and driven the enemy, but had neglected to hold its advantage, and the rebels returning, had awaited until the Fifty-first was upon their bayonet ends, when they deliberately opened fire. The column was instantly drawn under cover of the wall that flanks the road, and soon after was deployed to the left of the road, under a fence that stretches at right angles to it. Fire was immediately opened upon the enemy, which was kept up until the ammunition was spent, when it was relieved by the Fifty-first New York, Colonel Potter, lying in close supporting distance. Returning again to the contest, fire was continued until the enemy, finding himself hard pressed on all sides and his position rendered insecure, fled under cover of darkness, and in the morning the columns advanced without opposition. General Reno was killed early in the contest.

The battle of Antietam opened on the afternoon of the 16th of September, General Hooker crossing Antietam Creek and attacking the enemy's left with great impetuosity and the most triumphant success, and was followed up on the morning of the 17th with even greater impetuosity by the commands of Mansfield and Sumner. In the mean time the left and centre of the Union line, stretching away towards the Potomac on the left bank of the creek, remained quiet spectators of the desperate encounter on the right. At nine o'clock on the morning of the 17th, when the struggle upon the right had been four hours in progress, General Cox, in command of the Ninth Army Corps since the fall of Reno, was ordered to advance and carry the stone bridge on the extreme left of the line, firmly held by the enemy.
"The bridge itself is a stone structure of three arches, with stone parapet above, this parapet to some extent flanking the approach to the bridge at either end. The valley in which the stream runs is quite narrow, the steep slope on the right bank approaching to the water's edge. In this slope the road-way is scarped, running both ways from the bridge and passing to the higher land above by ascending through ravines above and below, the upper ravine being some six hundred yards above the bridge, the town about half that distance below. On the hill-side immediately above the bridge was a strong stone fence running parallel to the steam; the turns of the road-way were covered by rifle-pits and breast works made of rails and stone, all of which defenses, as well as the woods which covered the slope, were filled with the enemy's infantry and sharpshooters. Besides the infantry defenses, battMontgomerys were placed to enfilade the bridge and all its approaches."
(*****) Against this position, strong by nature, rendered doubly strong by art, the Eleventh Connecticut and Crook's brigade, supported by Sturgis' division, were ordered to the assault. As this force advanced up the open valley by the road which leads along the river-bank to the bridge, it was exposed to so warm a fire from the opposite heights, alive with the enemy, that it was forced to halt and reply. Sturgis' troops reached the head of the bridge, and the Second Maryland and the Sixth New Hampshire charged at double-quick with fixed bayonets; but the concentrated fire of the enemy upon it forced them to fall back. After repeated efforts these regiments were withdrawn. Burnside, nettled at the failure of this attempt and the consequent delay of his columns, and knowing full well in whom he could trust, ordered forward the Fifty-first. General Ferrero dashing up to the regiment, said,
"General Burnside orders the Fifty-first Pennsylvania to storm the bridge."
Hartranft, avoiding the road by the river bank, led his men in rear of the heights overlooking the river until he arrived opposite the bridge, when he moved boldly down the slope for the crossing. The instant his men came into the open ground in the valley they received a withering fire from the enemy's well-posted infantry, and many fell. A fence skirting the road proved a serious impediment, and in crossing it the men were particularly exposed. Here fell Captains Bolton and Hart, severely wounded, a serious loss at this juncture. Unheeding the enemy's bullets or the obstruction, by the way, the column moved forward with a determined front, and made straight for the bridge. As they entered, a storm of missiles swept it, but no danger could stay that tide of living valor. Hartranft, who led the way, paused in the midst, and was hastening on the rear of his column when he was joined by Colonel Potter, with the gallant Fifty-first New York. With a shout that rang out above the noise of the battle the two columns rushed forward, and were soon firmly established on the thither bank. The bridge was carried!

A regiment was quickly advanced, and took position on the heights commanding the bridge and its approaches, driving out the enemy and rendering the crossing for infantry secure. The whole corps now advanced rapidly, took position on the heights above the bridge, and immediately advanced to the attack. The Fifty-first was posted on the second range of hills overlooking the creek, some distance below the bridge. Here it was soon hotly engaged with the enemy under cover of a stone wall and in a cornfield on its left. Its ammunition was soon exhausted, and a fresh supply failing to arrive as ordered, the men held their position with the bayonet until relief came. But all this struggle and costly sacrifice was vain. The enemy, relieved by the slackening of the battle on the left and the arrival of a fresh corps from Harper's Ferry, was enabled to concentrate an overwhelming force upon this single corps, and it was forced to yield. The loss of the regiment was one hundred and twenty-five. Among the killed was Lieutenant-Colonel Bell,(6*) a most vigilant officer and most estimable man, and Lieutenants Beaver and Hunsicker. Of the wounded were Captains Bolton and Hart, Adjutant Shorkly, Quartermaster Freedly and Lieutenant Lynch. Upon the fall of Lieutenant-Colonel Bell, Major Schall was promoted to fill the vacancy, and Captain William J. Bolten, of Company A, was promoted to major.

Moving leisurely from the field of Antietam, the army crossed and again proceeded to the Rappahannock. General Burnside, now in chief command, determined to cross the river at Fredericksburg, and seek the foe beyond. Much delay was experienced in bringing up the pontoons, and when they were at length at hand, the enemy had concentrated in his immediate front, and stood ready to dispute the passage and contest the ground on the impregnable heights beyond. General Wilcox was now in command of the Ninth Corps, and on the afternoon of the 13th of December, the day on which the troops under Franklin had attacked on the left, it crossed the river upon the pontoons in front of the town, and advanced by the road leading to the left towards the heights. At a point intermediate between the heights and the town, the brigade, consisting of five regiments, under command of General Ferrero, was deployed to right and left under partial cover. Upon emerging from the town the troops were at once met by the enemy's fire. A steady fire was returned but with little effect, his lines lying close and securely behind his entrenchments. A lime-kiln marks the position where the brigade was deployed, whence it advanced gallantly, in face of a murderous fire, to a position on the left of the line occupied by the Second Corps. On the evening of the 14th, Sunday, one regiment, the Eleventh New Hampshire, was ordered forward on picket, and was hardly in position when Colonel Hartranft received orders to proceed with the remaining four regiments and relieve a division upon the skirmish line. On passing the neighborhood of a hospital some entrenching tools were discovered scattered about, and the men were ordered to take them forward. Arriving upon the line they were directed to throw up a breast-work for their protection. This they at first refused to do, digging not having at this time become fashionable. The command was renewed and the men fell to work, and when they began to see the fruits of their labor they prosecuted it with a will, and by morning of Monday had a good line of works formed. This was the first experience of digging by the Fifty-first. Here the line was under a fierce infantry and artillery fire, and the men were obliged to hug closely their cover. But the enemy manifested no disposition to attack, and after remaining in position until the morning of Tuesday the brigade was withdrawn, and recrossed the river upon the pontoons, which were soon after taken up. The advantages in this engagement were all on the side of the enemy, the attacks in front of the town proving futile; but nevertheless the history of the war furnishes few instances where the mettle of the troops was more severely tested than in the blows aimed at the fastnesses of those frowning heights. The loss was twelve killed and seventy-four wounded.

On the 25th of March, 1863, the regiment was ordered to Fortress Monroe, where it joined the brigade, now consisting of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania, Fifty-first New York, Twenty-first Massachusetts and the Eleventh New Hampshire, and thence proceeded, with two divisions of the Ninth Corps, to Kentucky. At Cincinnati General Burnside met the troops, welcoming them to his new department and encouraging them to deeds of patriotic devotion. The regiment moved by rail to Paris, and was posted successively at Winchester, Lancaster, Crab Orchard and Stanford, principally engaged in holding the interior of the State against the invasions of the raiders Wheeler, Morgan and Pegram.

From Kentucky the corps, under the command of General Parke, was ordered to the support of Grant at Vicksburg. The Fifty-first broke camp on the 4th of June, and arrived in the rear of the great strong hold of the Mississippi on the 14th. Its camp was established in Mill Dale, where little of interest occurred until the 23d, when it was detailed to dig rifle-pits and cut away the woods for the protection of the rear against a rebel army under Johnston, now assuming a threatening attitude. Working-parties were relieved every two hours, and the duty was diligently prosecuted until miles of pits and field-works were constructed and whole forests slashed away. On the morning of the 29th the division was ordered to Oak Bridge, where it relieved a portion of McPherson's corps, and was again employed in fortifying. At ten o'clock on the morning of the 4th of July came intelligence of the fall of Vicksburg, and with it twenty one bags of mail matter for the division, of not less interest, for the moment, than the surrender.

The regiment accompanied Sherman in his campaign to Jackson, and on the 11th arrived upon the enemy's front. It was immediately placed in position on the left of the line in support of the Second Michigan Colonel Humphrey. At eight o'clock on the morning of the 12th a heavy cannonade was opened on both sides, which was kept up during the entire day, the regiment suffering considerable loss. During the night the men were busy digging rifle-pits, at many points within a few yards of the rebel sentries. On the morning of the 14th, after three days and two nights of constant skirmishing and fatigue duty, the regiment was relieved and withdrawn to the rear of the Insane Asylum. On the 15th detachments from several regiments, embracing two companies, F and H, of the Fifty-first, all under command of Major Wright, of the Fifty-first New York, were sent to reconnoitre the left as far as the Pearl River, and ascertain if a crossing could be effected. By accident the command struck the river opposite to the point where the enemy's trains and reserved artillery were parked. The appearance of our troops in this quarter was reported to Johnston, who, supposing it to be a demonstration in force, and fearing for the safety of his army, at once commenced a retreat.(7*) The city was occupied on the 18th, the regiment stacking arms in front of the State-House. Remaining two or three days to complete the work of destruction, Sherman marched back to Vicksburg.

The Ninth Corps now returned to Burnside's command, and went into camp in Kentucky, the Fifty-first leaving the railroad at Nicholasville, and taking post at Camp Nelson. Here it rested and refitted. The service in Mississippi had been very severe. Digging, felling forests, and making forced marches under the burning suns of the south had broken down the health of many a strong man, and had induced fevers peculiar to that region. Colonel Hartranft fell a victim to their influence, and was for a long time prostrated. From Camp Nelson the regiment moved to Crab Orchard, where it received recruits, and thence marched across the mountains, via Cumberland Gap, to Knoxville.

Soon after its arrival it was ordered down the valley to Loudon, where preparations had been made for going into winter-quarters; but scarcely had it arrived when it was ordered back to Lenoir, where it remained several days. Here Colonel Hartranft, who had so far recovered as to take the field, rejoined the regiment, and immediately assumed command of the Second Division of the Ninth Corps. His arrival was opportune. Longstreet, cutting loose from Bragg at Chattanooga, was threatening Burnside with a force thrice his number, and had already arrived in the neighborhood of Loudon. Perceiving his advantage, the rebel chief pushed across the Tennessee, and put his columns in motion for Campbell's Station, a point where several important roads centre, with the design of reaching it in advance of Burnside's forces, and thus cutting off and capturing his whole command. In this he had the advantage of the shortest and most direct road. Burnside discovered his danger just in time to avert it. The Fifty-first was charged with moving Benjamin's heavy battery. The mud was very deep, and the roads, badly cut up by the trains, were next to impassable. All night long the regiment toiled through the mire to bring up the guns. The station was reached in advance of the enemy, and immediately proceeding out upon the Kingston road, Colonel Hartranft deployed his division across it, with his left thrown forward to cover the Loudon road, along which our army and trains were moving. Before these dispositions had fairly been made the head of the rebel column appeared. Held back for awhile by a few mounted infantry, Longstreet soon brought up heavy columns and opened a furious attack. This was met by a destructive and continuous fire from Hartranft's lines, which caused the enemy to recoil in confusion. Steadfastly holding his ground until the remainder of the army and all the trains had safely passed the threatened point, Hartranft withdrew his troops, regiment by regiment, and took position on the left of the new line of battle, which had been formed on a low row range of hills beyond the station. In the mean time Benjamin's battery, which had been brought safely in, took position and did most effective service, engaging and driving the enemy's artillery wherever it made its appearance. So much were the Union forces outnumbered, that the contest was waged with no hope of victory, but only to save the army and its material. Accordingly, successive lines of battle were taken up in advantageous positions, and each was held until forced from it, when the troops retired behind fresh troops that had occupied the next. In this way the enemy was held at bay until dark, when he rested, and Burnside's columns, under cover of darkness, were all brought off safely into Knoxville.

Here the troops were immediately put to fortifying. Ferrero, with the First Division, held the left of the line, with the river upon his flank, and Fort Sanders, an earth-work mounted with Benjamin's guns, in the centre. Hartranft held the right, his line crossing the principal road leading from Cumberland Gap to Knoxville. Upon his right was a mill fed by a small stream. Across this a heavy dam was built, which flooded the ground for a considerable distance around. Upon this lake the right of the line rested securely. For many clays the work of fortifying was prosecuted without cessation. Fortunately, Longstreet delayed his attack until the works were completed and the army was secure. But the troops were exposed to a danger more imperious and fatal than rebel bullets. It was hunger. During all the hardships of the siege the men had been compelled to subsist on meagre rations of a quality hardly capable of sustaining life. The days were counted when even these would fail. Fortunately, before they were numbered, Grant, hayving relieved the army at Chattanooga from its toils, sent a powerful force under Sherman to the support of Burnside, and the siege was raised.

Trains soon after arrived with provisions, and pursuit of the enemy was at once commenced. In this the Fifty-first joined, and came up with the rebel rear-guard at Rutledge, in the valley of the Ho1sten, where skirmishing ensued. Here the pursuit was stayed, and the regiment retired to the neighborhood of Blame's Cross-Roads, where it went into winter-quarters. Still only meagre supplies of food and clothing were received, and the troops suffered much. On the 5th of January the regiment re-enlisted for an additional term of three years, and received orders to commence the homeward march. Poorly clad and short of rations, the men braved the perils of a wintry march across the mountains of East Tennessee, and after enduring untold sufferings and hardships by the way, finally arrived at Camp Nelson, where abundant supplies of food and clothing were received. Pausing a few days at Cincinnati for the preparation of the company rolls, the regiment proceeded to Harrisburg, where it received a veteran furlough. Upon his arrival at Norristown, Colonel Hartranft and the five companies from Montgomery County received a flattering ovation, in which the speaker upon the occasion, Mr. B.E. Chain, said:
"It is to you, colonel, that the regiment owes the character it bears. Your discipline in the camp, your foresight on the march, your coolness, bravery and judgment on the battlefield, have won the confidence and love of your men, and made them heroes in the fight. They knew that you never ordered where you did not lead."


So popular was the regiment at home that it was soon recruited to more than the maximum strength, and upon the expiration of the veteran furlough rendezvoused at Annapolis, Md., where the Ninth Corps was assembling. It was here assigned to the First Brigade of the First Division, consisting of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania, the One Hundred and Ninth New York and the Second, Eighth, Seventeenth and Twenty-seventh Michigan, Colonel Hartranft in command, Lieutenant-Colonel Schall leading the regiment.

Upon the opening of the spring campaign under Grant the Ninth Corps broke camp, and moving through Washington, where it was reviewed by the President, joined the army, and on the 5th of May, crossed the Rapidan. It immediately moved to the front and took position between Hancock and Warren. Hartranft's brigade was upon the centre of the line, and it was with considerable difficulty that it could be got into position. Captain hart, who was now serving upon the staff of the colonel, was ordered to go forward until he found the enemy's skirmishers. Pushing through the thick growth of pines, the first intimation he received of an enemy's presence was a rebel bullet whistling by his ears. The brigade was now led in by regiments, the men creeping through the dense undergrowth as best they could.
"The advance was made,"
says Colonel Hartranft in his official report,
"with great difficulty, on account of the woods and underbrush, which were on fire. I formed my line, making nearly a right angle facing south and east. The enemy was in force in front of my left. While in this position I received orders from Major-General Burnside to advance and carry the enemy's works. I ordered the advance at ten A.M., holding the Second Michigan in reserve and directing the Seventeenth Michigan to watch well the right flank. The lines moved forward, and I carried the enemy's works and held them for a moment, until a panic seized the left, which brought the whole line back in confusion. I immediately advanced skirmishers from the Second and Seventeenth Michigan, also moved the Seventeenth more to the left, and on these regiments re-formed my line. In this charge many prisoners were taken from the enemy, but lost perhaps an equal number."
In the afternoon the brigade again advanced, but encountered stern resistance, and lost many in killed and wounded. On the 7th the line was again moved forward, breast-works were thrown up and considerable skirmishing ensued.

On the morning of the 9th the brigade was withdrawn and moved to the Ny River, where the enemy was soon found. A crossing was effected on the 12th, and the rebels, after a stern resistance, were driven back. In this engagement six companies of the Fifty-first were deployed as skirmishers, supported by the remaining four, and gallantly carried the wooded heights in their front, compelling the enemy to burn a house in which he had taken shelter, and retire. To date from this battle, Colonel Hartranft was promoted to brigadier-general, Lieutenant-Colonel Schall to colonel, Major Bolton to lieutenant-colonel, and Captain Hart to major. From the 12th to the 18th the line of the brigade remained substantially unchanged, the enemy hugging closely their works, ready at any moment to repel an attack. Upon the withdrawal of the brigade from the position occupied on the 27th a few men, belonging to the Fifty-first, engaged upon the picket line, could not be brought in, and fell into the hands of the enemy. A succession of movements by the left flank brought the brigade to Cold Harbor on the 1st of June. At six o'clock on the morning of the 3d the brigade advanced with orders to retake the line from which the enemy had driven our troops on the previous day. Potter's division advanced at the same time on the right. In the face of a terrific fire of infantry and artillery, the lines rushed forward, routed the enemy, and were soon well established within two hundred yards of his main line, where, in a re-entrant angle of his own works, he had four guns. These proved of little value to him, as they were so closely watched by our sharpshooters that it was impossible for the gunners to work them. In this charge, at the head of his column, Colonel Schall was killed, and was succeeded in command by Lieutenant-Colonel Bolton. The boss here, as in the preceding battles of the campaign, was very heavy, but for want of data cannot be given.

Crossing the Chickahominy and the James, the Ninth Corps arrived in front of Petersburg on the 17th, and at once engaged the enemy. General Hartranft's brigade made a most gallant charge in face of a galling fire of the rebel artillery, suffering heavy loss.

On the following day it was again engaged upon the railroad cut in front of the locality afterwards selected for the mine, and gained a position in close proximity to the enemy's works, which was held and fortified. So close to the rebel line was this position that it required unceasing vigilance to hold it, and for seventeen successive days and nights an unceasing fire of musketry was kept up, one-third of the men being constantly employed. After a few days' respite it was again returned to the vicinity of its old position, where it remained until the explosion of the mine. On the day previous it was relieved and ordered to form part of the storming column. When the explosion took place it advanced, and two companies had reached the brink, when General Hartranft, who was in the crater, finding that more troops were already in than could be used, ordered it back. In this perilous advance Colonel Bolton was severely wounded, and the command devolved on Major Hart. The brigade was again put upon the line fronting the crater, where it remained for a few days, when it was relieved and passed to the rear out of harm's way. Here it remained in camp until the 19th of August, when it was ordered to the support of Warren, on the Weldon Railroad. Crawford's division formed the connecting link between Hancock and Warren, a distance of a half mile. Upon this the enemy fell in heavy force and captured the greater portion of it, making a dangerous gap, and exposing Warren to imminent peril. Hartranft, who was lying in supporting distance, and judging by the sound of battle that our forces had been dispersed, though not under orders, magnanimously moved to the rescue, and by interposing his brigade and by stubbornly holding his ground, saved the day. A permanent lodgment was thereby made upon the Weldon road, which had been one of the enemy's chief lines of supply.

In the subsequent operations of the brigade the Fifty-first, under command of Colonel Bolton, participated, engaging the enemy at Poplar Spring Church, at Ream's Station, at Hatcher's Run and in the final attack on the 2nd of April, which resulted in the evacuation of Richmond. On the 27th of July, after four years of arduous service, extending over the whole line from the Atlantic to the Mississippi, it was mustered out of service at Alexandria, Va.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

John F. Hartranft, col., mustered in July 27, 1861; promoted to brig.-gen. June 5, 1864; to brevet maj.-gen. March 25, 1865.

William J. Bolton, col., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. A to maj. Sept. 17, 1862; to col. June 26, 1864; to brevet brig.-gen. March 13, 1865; must. out with regiment July 27, 1865.

Thomas S. Bell, lieutenant-col., mustered in July 27, 1861; killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Edwin Schall, lieutenant-col., mustered in July 27, 1861; promoted from maj. to lieutenant- col. Sept. 17, 1862; killed at Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864.

William Allebaugh, lieutenant-col., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from Capt. Co. C to lieutenant col. April 23, 1865; to brevet col. March 13, 1865; must. out with regiment July 27, 1865.

Lane S. Hart, maj., mustered in Sept. 2, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. F to maj. July 21, 1864; discharged Dec. 17, 1864, for wounds received at Weldon Railroad Aug. 19, 1864.

Joseph K. Bolton, maj., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. A to maj, Jan, 15, 1865; must. out with regiment July 26, 1865.

Daniel P. Bible, adjt., mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; res. June 5, 1862.

George Shorkley, adjt., mustered in Nov. 16, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. H to adjt. June 6, 1862; to capt. Co. H April 22, 1864.

Martin L. Schock, adjt., mustered in Sept. 9, 1861; promoted from 2ndl lieutenant Co. E to 1st lieutenant and adjt. May 2, 1864; discharged Nov. 2, 1864, for wounds received in action.

Jacob H. Santo, adjt., mustered in Nov. 16, 1861; promoted from 2nd lieutenant

Co. H to 1st lieutenant and adjt. Jan. 15, 1865; mustered out with regiment July 27, 1865.

John J. Freedley, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 15, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. C Oct. 17, 1861; res. May 11, 1863.

Samuel P. Stephens, quartermaster, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. F to com. sergt. Nov. 16, 1861; to quartermaster May 13, 1863; must. out with regiment July 27, 1865.

J.A. Livergood, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 14, 1861; transferred to 101st Regiment P.V. Nov. 20, 1861.

John A. Hosack, surgeon, mustered in Oct. 15, 1861; transferred from 101st Regiment P.V. Nov. 20, 1861; res. July 30, 1863.

William C. Shurlock, surgeon, mustered in March 9, 1864; must. out June 5, 1865.

Manning F. Bowers, surgeon, mustered in June 22, 1865; must. out with regiment July 27, 1865.

James D. Noble, assist. surgeon, mustered in Sept. 14, 1861; res. July 21, 1862.

John B. Reinholdt, assist. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 1, 1862; must. out June 5, 1865.

Charles S. Duffell, assist. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; must. out Nov. 16, 1864. exp. of term.

James Cress,assist surgeon, mustered in Feb. 11, 1865; must. out with regiment July 27, 1865.

Daniel U. Mallory, chapn., mustered in Oct. 17, 1861; rev. July 27, 1861; recom. April 8, 1864; discharged by S.O., Sept. 2, 1864.

Levi. W. Shingle, sergt.-maj., mustered in Sept 13, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. C Jan. 14, 1865; must. out with regiment July 27, 1865; veteran.

Curtin B. Stoneroad, sergt.-maj., mustered in Oct. 17, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. G June 25, 1864.

George C. Gutelius, sergt.-maj., mustered in Sept. 9, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. E Jan. 14, 1865; veteran.

Louis Cartuyvel, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Oct. 17, 1861; must. out with regiment July 27, 1865; veteran.

Christopher Wyckoff, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted from cor. Co., F to quartermaster-sergt. Dec. 12, 1863; discharged by special order March 5, 1865; veteran.

Levi Bolton, com. sergt., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted from corp. Co. A Dec. 3, 1861 must. out with regiment July 27, 1865; veteran.

Thomas H. Parker, com. Sergt., Sept. 28, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. Co. I to com. sergt; to capt. Co. I Dec. 2, 1864; veteran.

Allen H. Filman, com. sergt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieut, Co. F July 22, 1864; veteran.

Martin H. Dunn, hosp. steward, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with regiment July 27, 1866; veteran.

Edward D. Johnson, principal musician, mustered in April 4, 1863; must. out with regiment July 27, 1865.


COMPANY A.

Recruited at Norristown.

William J. Bolton, capt., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted to maj. Sept. 17, 1862.

Joseph K. Bolton, capt., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant to capt. Sept. 17, 1862; to maj. Jan. 15, 1865.

John H. Coulson, capt., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant May 3, 1864; to 1st lieutenant Oct. 1, 1864; to Capt. Jan. 15, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Abraham L. Ortlip, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from 2nd to 1st lieutenant Sept. 17, 1862; res. April 20, 1864.

John S. Moore, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Sept. 17, 1862; to 1st lieutenant May 3, 1864; killed at Wilderness May 6, 1864; buried in Wilderness burial grounds.

Benjamin P. Thompson, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. to 2nd lieut, June 25, 1864; to lieutenant April 11, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Edward L. Evans, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Jan. 13, 1885; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Osman Ortlip, 1st sergt., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Isaac E. Filman, sergt., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Charles M. Henniss, sergt., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Washington Smith, sergt., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted from corp. to sergt. Jan. 13, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

James O'Neill, sergt., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted from corp. to sergt. April 11, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865 veteran.

Jacob H. Moyer, sergt., mustered in Sept, 12, 1861; died July 12, 1864, of wounds received at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; veteran.

Robert Supplee, sergt., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Weaverton Hosp., Md., Oct. 27, 1862.

Jesse Herbster, Corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

George S. Buzzard, Corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Jonathan B. Ellis, corp., mustered in March 30, 1864; must. out with Company July 27, 1865.

Hiram C. Lysinger, corp., mustered in Feb. 18, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Amandus Garges, Corp., mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Getman, corp., mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Henry Dickenson, corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted to corp. June 3, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

James W. Doud, corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted to corp. June 23, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John S. Jones, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; discharged by G.0. June 2, 1865.

Daniel Lare, corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. of term.

Frank H. Mills, corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; veteran.

George Vebele, Corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died June 18, 1864, of wounds received at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864.

John Adams, corp., mustered in April 27, 1864.

Joseph White, Corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Middletown, Md., Sept. 15, 1862, of wounds received at South Mountain Sept. 14, 1862.

Abraham Butz, corp., mustered in Sept 12, 1861; discharged April 21, 1863.

John C. Brannon, comp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Newbern, N.C., May 21, 1862.

Levi Bolton, Corp., mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; promoted to com. sergt. Dec. 3, 1864.

John W. Shillick, musician, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with

company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William Barringer, musician, mustered in Feb. 6, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Edward D. Johnson, musician, mustered in April 4, 1863; transferred to Co. C, date unknown.

Privates.

Henry Abbott, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry Alter, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

George B. Baker, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James W. Baten, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Henry Backus, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Albert Barndt, mustered in Feb. 6, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel S. Buzzard, mustered in Feb. 15, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Benjamin F. Bolton, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864; exp. of term.

Samuel Bargert, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; disch, by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Elijah Block, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

James Block, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Jonas Beam, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Joseph S. Burkhart, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

William Brown, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

William Barr, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged by G.O. May 12, 1865; veteran.

James M. Baker, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; discharged by G.O. July 11, 1865.

Thomas J. Bolton, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 25, 1865; veteran.

Jonathan Brooks, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to Co. G, date unknown.

George Bodey, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Warrenton Junction, Va., May 2, 1864; veteran.

Henry Boyer, mustered in Feb. 8, 1864; died at Annapolis, Md., May 4, 1864.

John Bare, mustered in Feb. 20, 1864; died at Washington, D.C., May 20, 1864, of wounds received at Wilderness May 6, 1864.

George W. Berks, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; captured May 27, 1864; died at Andersonville, Ga., Oct. 24, 1864. grave 11,434.

William Backer, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 1, 1865.

Archibald W. Berks, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864.

Benjamin Brownell, mustered in Aug. 18, 1864.

George Bond, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Harrisburg, Pa., Oct. 20, 1861.

James Bolton, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged June 24, 1863.

Jacob Bennett, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged Dec. 2, 1862.

Irwin Barndt, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 8, 1863.

Gotlieb Bellman, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died Nov. 19, 1862.

William H. Carrier, mustered in Oct. 10, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Enos Case, mustered in Feb. 27, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Claycomb, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; substitute; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 23, 1864.

Richard N. Capwell, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry Constable, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry Collego, mustered in Sept. 21, 1864; drafted; disch, by G.O. June 2, 1865.

William Carney, mustered in Jan. 8, 1864; died Aug. 19, 1864; buried in Cypress Hill Cemetery, Long Island.

Davis Campbell, must, in Sept. 12, 1861; disch, June 28, 1863.

John Clare, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; transferred to Batt. K, U.S. Art., Oct. 27, 1862.

James Clare, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Benjamin F. Doud, mustered in Jan. 18, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel C. Doud, mustered in Jan. 24, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Franklin Delinger, mustered in March 29, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Joseph H. Divers, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept, 11, 1864, expiration of term.

Thomas Doud, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, expiration of term.

A. Druckenmiller, mustered in Oct. 16, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Samuel Delinger, mustered in Feb. 6, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 13, 1865.

Daniel Dried, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Jacob H. Derr, mustered in Feb. 28, 1864; died May 28, 1864, of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.

Simon Dobson, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; died April 3, 1565, of wounds received at Petersburg, Va., April 1, 1865.

Isaac De Haven, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; transferred to Batt. K, U.S. Art., Oct. 27, 1862.

Charles B. Evans, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Daniel Erker, mustered in Oct. 10, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George Eckhart, mustered in Jan. 27, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Harrison English, mustered in Jan. 30, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Samuel H. Frease, mustered in Jan. 14, 1864; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864; absent at must. out.

Thomas Farrell, mustered in Feb. 17, 1864; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864; discharged by G.O. July 24, 1865.

John G. Fried, mustered in Jan. 5, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Florey, mustered in Sept. 17, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Lewis C. Fisher, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Israel Foos, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Archibald Findley, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry Foucht, mustered in Sept. 30, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Jesse Frease, mustered in Feb. 20, 1864; killed at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864.

Charles Fix, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Philadelphia, Pa., June 18, 1864, of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864.

Samuel Foreman, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged Jan. 29, 1863.

Nathan Foreman, mustered in Sept: 12, 1861; discharged Feb. 18, 1863.

Lind'y R. Franklin, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged March 4, 1863.

John Gross, mustered in March 3, 1865, must, out with company July 27, 1865.

Joseph Gearhart, mustered in March 13, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Theodore Gilbert, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. of term.

Israel Gauker, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Jeremiah Grey, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died May 16, 1864, of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House May 14, 1864 buried in Wilderness Burial Grounds.

Benjamin Goodwin, mustered in Aug. 18, 1862; deserted Aug. 30, 1863.

Frederick Geisinger, mustered in Oct. 7, 1864; substitute; deserted May 30, 1865.

Jonathan Goodwin, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged Dec. 2, 1862.

William Hoffman, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Charles S. Hansell, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William Herbster, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George A. Hugnenin, mustered in Oct. 17, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Allen Hildreath, mustered in March 13, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Charles G. Hunsinger, mustered in Jan. 27, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Patrick H. Hamill, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. of term.

William H. Harner, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Edward Hallmnan, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps March 4, 1865.

Samuel Haines, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; transferred to Vet, Res. Corps March 4, 1865.

William Horff, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; captured Aug. 21, 1864; died at Salisbury, N.C., Nov. 3, 1864.

Daniel Hood, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864;

Charles S. Hausell, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Charles Hayberry, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; transferred to Batt. K, U.S. Art,, Oct. 27, 1862.

William Heard, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

John Henniss, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; transferred to Batt. K, U.S. Art., Oct. 27, 1862.

Isaac M.D. Irwin, mustered in Feb. 20, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John H. Jordan, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Ralph Jones, mustered in Feb, 20, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Wilson James, mustered in Jan. 12, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jesse Johnson, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. of term.

Jesse Johnson, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps March 4, 1865.

Samuel H. Jones, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; captured at Clinch Mountains, Tenn., Dec. 13, 1863.

Abraham Jones, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; captured at Clinch Mountains, Tenn., Dec. 13, 1863.

Asbury M. Johnson, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged Sept. 8, 1862.

Benjamin D. Jones, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged Jan. 4, 1863.

Jacob W. Culp, mustered in Jan. 13, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Barney Kelley, mustered in Feb. 6, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Edwin Kellichner, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. of term.

Jacob Keller, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; disch, by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Charles Keyser, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died Sept. 30, 1862, of wounds received at Antietam, Md.

Lewis T. Keyser, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861.

William Kilpatrick, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Harrisburg, Pa., Dec. 1, 1861.

Lucius Lake, mustered in Oct. 10, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Joseph N. Lewis, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. of term.

Christian Limick, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861.

Charles A. Murray, mustered in Feb. 8, 1864; absent, undergoing sent. G, C.M. at Auburn, N.Y.

Joseph Moyer, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William Mason, mustered in Feb. 4, 1865; absent, sick, at muster out.

Thomas Morton, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. Of term.

Samuel J. Miller, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Lewis Mattis, mustered in March 16, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va., July 5, 1861.

Nelson Y. Mattis, mustered in Feb. 23, 1164; captured July 30, 1864; died at Danville, Va., Jan. 10, 1865.

Lewis Myers, mustered in Feb. 17, 1864; died July 18, 1864, at Philadelphia, Pa., of wounds received at Petersburg, June 17, 1864.

Alexander Mack, mustered in Aug. 1, 1864.

James Maquire, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861 killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

Jacob W. Slarkley, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; disch, on surgeon certif. March 21, 1863.

Samuel McCombs, mustered in Feb. 12, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William McKane, mustered in Oct. 17, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Thomas McGrail, mustered in Oct. 10, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James T. McMullen, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1863.

Henry McLain, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; captured Aug. 21, 1864; died at Salisbury, N.C., date unknown.

James McGlinchey, mustered in Jan. 6, 1865.

Washington McDade, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

Daniel McGugan, mustered in Sept, 12, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 18, 1863.

David McMicken, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

Andrew McKane, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; deserted Feb. 23, 1863.

William Nunheimer, mustered in Feb. 12, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Randolph Noll, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Lewis Nathans, mustered in Jan. 26, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 6, 1865.

Monroe Nyce, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861.

Jacob Oster, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Ephraim Parvin, mustered in Feb. 20, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel G. Parker, mustered in Oct. 4, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Harvey Pinch, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Annapolis, Md., March 30, 1864; veteran.

Winfield Pinch, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; transferred to Batt. K, U.S. Art., date unknown.

Edward Quinlan, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; killed at Columbus, O., March 30, 1863.

William Reed, mustered in March 4. 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Richard, mustered in Feb. 18, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James Richard, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James Reily, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

David Richard, mustered in Jan. 5, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jacob Rittenhouse, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. of term.

Robert Roberts, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; must. out Sept. 11, 1864, exp. of term.

Albert Rodgers, mustered in Jan. 25, 1865; disch, by G.O. May 25, 1863.

David Raunzahn, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Lemuel Raudebaugh, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 27, 1861.

Daniel Reed, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

John D. Smith, mustered in Sept. 12 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Joseph Supplee, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Saylor, mustered in Feb. 10, 1864; wounded at Spottsylvania Court House May 12, 1864; absent at muster out.

John Schafer, mustered in Jan. 14, 1865; must. out with Co. July 27, 1865.

Abraham D. Stover, mustered in March 4, 1865; must. out with Company July 27, 1865.

Austin Shelly, mustered in Jan. 27, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John W. Shriner, mustered in Aug. 24, 1864; absent at muster out.

Enos Shelly, mustered in Jan. 27, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel Strayer, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Frederick Settler, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; disch, by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Jacob Stearns, mustered in March 29, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps March 4, 1865.

Charles Sheets, mustered in Sept. 17, 1861; transferred to Co. G, date unknown.

Jacob Sweeney, mustered in Sept. 16, 1861; transferred to Co. G, date unknown.

George Smith, mustered in Feb. 4, 1864; died May 28, 1864, of wounds received at Wilderness May 6, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.

Henry Smith, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; died May 14, 1864, of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864.

Adolph Sander, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Harrisburg, Pa., Nov. 10, 1861.

David Schraek, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; died at Beaufort, N.C., July 12, 1862.

Edwin R.W. Sickel, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 22, 1862.

Theodore Schock, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Nov. 22, 1862.

Thomas Selah, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861.

Solomon Sensenderfer, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 8, 1863.

Israel Shade, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861.

John Shade, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged Jan. 2, 1862.

William Somerlot, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Daniel Stout, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged Dec. 29, 1862.

Sinclair Tillson, mustered in Oct 7, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Turner, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Charles Toy, mustered in Aug. 28, 1862; discharged on surg certif. Nov. 22, 1864.

Enos Winters, mustered in Feb. 18, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Welsh, mustered in Jan, 23, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jonathan Weeber, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; discharged March 6, 1865, for wounds received in action.

Adam B. Williams, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1863.

Michael Wadsworth, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

George Widger, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Nov. 14, 1862.

Harry C. Wood, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. April 28, 1863.

Andrew Widger, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 17, 1862.

Adam W. Yeager, mustered in Sept. 12. 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., July 15, 1864.

Charles Yunker, mustered in Oct. 27, 1861; wounded and prisoner at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864.

Joseph H. Zearfoss, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged by order of War Dept. Jan. 27, 1865.

John Zeigrist, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 6, 1863.


COMPANY C.

Recruited in Montgomery County.

William Allebaugh, capt., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted to lieutenant-col. April 23, 1865.

William F. Thomas, capt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Sept. 19, 1862; to 1st lieutenant Nay 13, 1864; to capt. April 24, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John J. Freedley, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted to Regiment quartermaster Oct. 17, 1861.

Davis Hunsicker, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from 2nd to 1st lieutenant Oct. 17, 1861; killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Thomas J. Lynch, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Oct. 2, 1861; promoted from 2nd to 1st lieutenant Sept. 19, 1862; died May 13, 1864, of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House.

George H. Smith, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Aug. 8, 1864; to 1st lieutenant April 25, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John W. Fair, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 1st sergt.; to 24 lieutenant May 17, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Nathan H. Ramsey, 1st sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 1st sergt. May 17, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865 veteran.

Benjamin F. Miller, sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Montgomery Smith, sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Peter Undercofler, sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William R. Gilbert, sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted from corp. to sergt. May 17, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Levi W. Shingle, sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted to sergt.-maj, Jan. 14, 1865 veteran.

Patrick Kevin, sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Wilderness May 6, 1864; veteran.

William Eastwood, sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Jan. 10, 1863.

Samuel Fair, sergt., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. D Oct. 1861.

William Robinson, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John C. Umstead, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Henry H. Lightcap, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Andrew J. Reed, Corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Hugh Lynch, corp., mustered in Nov. 9, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Benjamin R. Sill, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted to corp. May 1, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Hugh McClain, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted to corp. May 17, 1865 must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William Bean, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted to corp. May 25, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Andrew J. Grim, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died June 6, 1864, of wounds received in action; buried in National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.

William Hooker, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864; veteran.

Joseph Cornog, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864; veteran.

David Kane, Corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Samuel Hart, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; sentenced by general court -marshal to Rip-Raps, Aug. 1862.

Edward D. Johnson, musician, mustered in April 4, 1863; promoted to principal musician March 1, 1865.

Privates.

Thomas Allen, mustered in Sept. 13, 1801; must. out Sept. 13, 1864, exp. of term.

Andrew J. Bell, mustered in Aug. 16, 1863; missing at North Anna May 27, 1864.

Christopher Briggs, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1864; veteran.

William F. Black, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William M. Bryn, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864 substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Charles Bryant, mustered in April 1, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Robert Barclay, mustered in March 27, 1865 substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Brautlinger, mustered in Feb. 6, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William Barry, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out Sept. 13, 1861, exp. of term.

George W. Breish, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out Sept. 13, 1864, exp. of term.

Jacob Bruner, mustered in March 25, 1865; died at Alexandria, Va., May 20, 1865.

Richard Brown, mustered in March 2, 1864.

Levi Baum, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Sept. 1863.

John Creamer, mustered in Jan. 20, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John J. Cook, mustered in Feb. 16, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Thomas R. Cook, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out Sept. 13, 1864. exp. of term.

James Condon, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Michael Carson, mustered in March 21, 1865, substitute.

Abraham Custer, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; disch, on surgeon certif., date unknown.

Albert Deeds, mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Michael Dillon, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; missing at Spottsylvania

Court-House May 12, 1864; veteran.

John T. Davis, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; absent, sick, at must. out.

Patrick Dillon, mustered in March 8, 1864 must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Darling, mustered in Jan. 12, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Henry Davis, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged, date unknown, for wounds received in action.

Samuel Dean, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died at Charleston, S.C., Sept. 20, 1864; veteran.

Michael Dougherty, mustered in March 3, 1864; died at Alexandria, Va., Sept. 20,

John Duffy, mustered in Oct. 11, 1864; substitute.

Reuben De Haven, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died July 10, 1863.

Joseph Detwiler, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged, date unknown. for wounds received in action.

Thomas Davis, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

H.D. Espenship, mustered in Feb.24, 1864; must. out with company Ju1y27, 1865; veteran.

W.I. Espenship, mustered in April 3, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Enos D. Espenship, mustered in March 4, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James W. Elliott, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, l865; veteran.

John E. Emery, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Samuel Egolf mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865 veteran.

David Espeniship, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Sept. 20, 1864; veteran.

Henry Erhard, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; died at Alexandria, Va., July 19, 1864.

Simon P. Emery, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Antietem Sept. 17, 1862.

Jacob Fizone, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William H.R. Fox, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 26, 1865; veteran.

Charles R. Fox, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; absent, on furlough, at must. out; veteran.

Franklin R. Fox, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; must. out with company July 17, 1865.

Emanuel Force, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; absent, in arrest, at must. out.

Patrick Fitzpatrick, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John Farrell, mustered in Jan. 12, 1565; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel J. Fry, mustered in Feb. 27, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Josiah M. Favinger, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; discharged July 6, 1865, for wounds received in action.

Oliver A. Fillman, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged March, 1863, for wounds received in action.

Mathew Ferrington, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged, date unknown.

Henry H. Fry, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed in front of Petersburg, date unknown.

William Gunn, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; mustered out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Franklin Grubb, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Joseph Green, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; absent, wounded, at muster out.

Marcus A. Gross, mustered in Jan. 26, 1865; absent, in arrest, at must. out.

James Gunn, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out Sept. 13, 1864, exp. of term.

William Gilland, mustered in Sept 20, 1864; drafted; discharged on sug. certif., Dec. 21, 1864.

Henry Gunter, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; killed at Petersburg, Va., Feb. 18, 1865.

William Gibbs, mustered in March 24, 1865; substitute.

Eli Garner, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died at Harrisburg, Pa., Nov. 12, 1861.

Marcus Cross, mustered in Sept. 13, l861; absent, at must. out.

Jesse Hallman, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Frederick Hauff, mustered in Oct. 10, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William Hotchkiss, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864; substitute; absent, wounded, at must. out.

George Holden, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Elwood Hamilton, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Jacob Hoover, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

James Hunt, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Franklin Hendricks, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864; veteran.

Henry C. Hughs, mustered in Sept. 13, 1661; transferred to company D., date unknown.

John Hallowell, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died from wounds received at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Val. Hartenstein, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured; died in rebel prison.

Robert A. Inglis, mustered in March 8, 1863; discharged by special order Nov. 25, 1864.

Henry Jago, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; absent, wounded, at must. out veteran.

Benjamin Johnson, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John Johnson, mustered in Feb. 14 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Edward C. Jones, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out Sept. 13, l864, exp. of term.

Frederick W. Johns, mustered in Sept 13, 1861; must. out Sept 13, 1864, exp. of term.

George Kevin, mustered in July 13, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jacob Keely, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William Keeler, mustered in March 20, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Benjamin Kooker, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; mis. at Spottsylvania, Court House, May 12, 1864; veteran.

Peter Kelley, mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; must. out with company July 27, l865.

Joshua A. Kevin. mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., Sept. 23, 1864; veteran.

Abraham Kile, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged on sur. certif., date unknown.

George W. Lightcap, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Joseph Leach, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864 substitute; must. cut with company July 27, 1865.

James N. Latham, mustered in March 27, 1865; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Abraham Lape, mustered in Aug. 30, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William H. Lath, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died Oct. 3, 1862; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery.

Thomas J. Lynch, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 1864; buried in Wilderness Burial-Grounds.

Griffith E. Morgan, mustered in March 4, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George Miller, mustered in March 23, 1863; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Andrew Miller, mustered in Feb. 16, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Peter Myers, mustered in Feb. 11, 1864.

James Murphy, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died Oct. 20, 1862; buried in National Cemetery, Newbern, N.C.

George Mercer, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

William Munshower, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Patrick McDade, mustered in Jan. 14, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James McDevitt, mustered in Jan. 21, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Charles McManamny, mustered in Jan. 18, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Nathaniel McVeigh, mustered in March 1, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John H. McGill, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; transferred to 21st Regt, P.V. Feb. 3, 1865.

George McGinley, mustered in Sept. 3, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, date unknown; veteran.

John McFaul, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; killed at Petersburg Feb. 13, 1865.

Owen McBride, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; veteran.

Jeremiah McMananmee, mustered in Sept. 13 1861.

Michael McMullin, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862.

John McMullin, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861.

George Newman, mustered in Sept. 19, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Eli H. Ostrander, mustered in Sept. 1, 1864; discharged by G.O, July 13, 1865.

Andrew J. O'Neal, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; prisoner from May 7, 1864, to April 25, 1865; discharged by G.O. May 24, 1865; veteran.

Sylvester Paul, mustered in Oct. 4, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John H. Peters, mustered in March 8, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George Pickup, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Charles Pfifer, mustered in Feb. 8, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. June 9, 1865.

John C. Parson, mustered in Feb. 1, 1865; discharged on surgeon certif., July 1, 1865.

John Plunkett, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861.

Michael Peters, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

Patrick Rogan, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Jacob B. Rinker, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Lewis Roeder, mustered in March 10, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Read, mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Charles Radebaugh, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out Sept. 13, 1864, exp. of term.

Allen Rogers, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out Sept. 13, 1864, exp. of term.

Morris Robinson, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861, died at Newport News, Va., June 13, 1862.

John M. Springer, mustered in March 4, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Charles Smith, mustered in March 27, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Washington M. Shaner, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

C.B. Schmearer, mustered in Feb. 27, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Thomas Sullivan, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James Sullivan, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

David R. Spare, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John Sherman, mustered in April 12, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel J. Shearer, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; absent, in arrest, at must. out.

Henry Sortman, mustered in Oct. 7, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George Stout, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1863; veteran.

Benjamin F. Smith, mustered in Feb. 22, 1865; discharged by General Order June 23, 1865.

Jacob W. Shaffer, mustered in Feb. 16, 1865; discharged by General Order July 5, 1865.

William C. Steltz, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out Sept. 13, 1864, exp of term.

Hilary Sloop, mustered in March 23, 1864; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., June 10, 1864.

Philip Stoflet, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; captured; died at Wilmington, N.C., March, 29, 1865.

Patrick Sullivan, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

John Snyder, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

George Sweeney, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862.

Stephen Tommay, mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Abraham Tochler, mustered in March 2, 1864; discharged April 13, 1865, for wounds received in action.

Michael Tinney, mustered in Feb. 6, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 9, 1865.

George B. Trumbull, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864; substitute.

Thomas Temperly, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

Jacob H. Umstead, mustered in March 7, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

H. Underkoffer, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John Upright, mustered in March 21, 1864; killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864.

Abraham Walt, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; absent, wounded, at must. out; veteran.

Charles White, mustered in March 3, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. date unknown.

Jeremiah Weight, mustered in Sept. 21, 1864; drafted; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 23, 1864.

Jacob Walters, mustered in April 21, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Henry P. Wood, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

James Waters, mustered in March 3, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Mark L. Yerger, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; absent, wounded, at must. out; veteran.

Henry K. Young, mustered in March 27, 1865; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.


COMPANY D.

Recruited at Norristown.

Edward Schall, capt., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; res. April 14, 1863.

Lewis Hollman, capt., mustered in Aug. 16, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant to capt. April 14, 1863; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Aug. 6, 1864.

William W. Owen, capt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. F to capt. Sept. 1, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Gilligan, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861.; promoted from sergt. to lieut, Aug. 12, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1863; veteran.

Samuel Fair, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. C to 2nd lieutenant Oct., 1861; died Sept. 21, 1862, of wounds received in action.

Jonathan Swallow, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Sept. 21, 1862; res. March 15, 1864.

Isaac Fizone, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant May 3, 1864; killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; veteran.

David Long, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; pro from sergt. to 2nd lieutenant June 25, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1863; veteran.

John Powell, 1st sergt., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Henry Foreman, 1st sergt., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged March 24, 1865, for wounds received in action; veteran.

William Dignan. 1st sergt., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864; veteran.

William D. Jenkins, sergt., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John McNulty, sergt., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John R. Grey, sergt., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Freemnan S. Davis, sergt., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864, exp. of term.

Walter M. Thompson, sergt., mustered in Sept 20, 1861; must. out Oct. 15, 1864, exp. of term.

Penrose W. Clair, sergt., mustered in Aug. 16, 1862; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Edwin Bennett, sergt., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Nov. 14, 1862.

John L. McCoy, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Andrew Fair, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John Dunn, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

James Powers, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Nicholas Murphy, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Albert List, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John Sutch, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864, exp. of term.

John Beal, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864, exp. of term.

Isaac N. Yocum, corp., mustered in July 31, 1862; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

William W. Smith, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps March 23, 1865; veteran.

Isaac Tolan, corp., mustered in Sept. 20. 1861; veteran.

George W. Bowman, corp., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died Feb. 4, 1862.

Albert Wood, mus., mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William S. Lauback, mus., mustered in Oct. 14, 1861; died at Newport, R.I., July 27, 1864.

Privates.

Joseph Anderson, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Albert Aronimer, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William Ackers, mustered in Aug. 8, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1864.

Thomas Andrews, mustered in Sept 26, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1864.

Thomas Boyd, mustered in April 5, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1864.

Charles Beswick, mustered in June 2, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Lewis Bumgardner, mustered in March 5, 1864; must. out with company July 27. 1865.

Thomas Browning, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; absent, sick, at must. out.

George Buehler, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jonathan Bancurt, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

William H. Bodey, mustered in March 3, 1864; died at Washington, D.C., May 16, 1864, of wounds received in action.

Charles Blakeney, mustered in Feb. 3, 1864; died at York, Pa., April 8, 1865.

George Barrett, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute.

John W. Bayle, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Sept. 3, 1863.

Samuel L. Clarke, mustered in Feb. 28, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James Cramer, mustered in Jan. 5, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jefferson C. Clare, mustered in Feb. 6, 1864; missing at Spottsylvania, Court House May 12, 1864.

Noble Creighton, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; wounded at Wilderness May 6, 1864; absent at must. out; veteran.

Addison Carnog, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William H. Clark, mustered in Oct. 13, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Colpetzer, mustered in Oct. 13, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William B. Cook, mustered in Sept. 26, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Jeremiah Cassedy, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; captured; died at Salisbury, N.C., Dec. 4, 1864.

Erwin Creighton, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 6, 1863.

James Conway, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died Jan. 16, 1862.

Adam Croutharnal, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861.

Thomas Dunbar, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William F. Deihl, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; must. out with company July 27, l865.

William F. Doan, mustered in Sept. 26, 1864; drafted; discharged on surgeon certif. Sept. 29, 1864.

Patrick Diamond, mustered in Sept. 14, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May 9, 1862.

John Dehaven, mustered in Sept. 11, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 21, 1863.

Charles Davis, mustered in Sept. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. June 5, 1862.

William Dewees, mustered in Sept. 4, 1861.

William Ellenburg, mustered in Oct. 13, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William Essick, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 12, 1864; veteran.

John Evans, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Walter Easton, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; killed accidentally April 8, 1865.

John Earle, mustered in Aug. 31, 1861; discharged 1863 for wounds, with loss of arm, received at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Henry Furlong, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James Fisher, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Hugh Fleming, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Michael Forbes, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 21, 1864.

Hiram C. Fisher, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Harman G. Fisher, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864, exp. of term.

Barnard Frank, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Mordecai Fizone, mustered in March 5, 1863; discharged by G.O. June 27, 1865.

William Ferguson, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute.

John R. Fleck, mustered in Sept. 20, 1864; discharged by special order July 21, 1865.

William Faulkner, mustered in Sept. 9, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Nov. 29, 1862.

John Gartner, mustered in March 25, 1865 substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Alfred R. Grey, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John B. Godley, mustered in Sept. 16, 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., July 6, 1864.

Frank Geanger, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute.

John Guyer, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 21, 1863.

John Guyder, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May 21, 1862.

Hector Gillian, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 15, 1863.

William Hudson, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute; absent, sick, at must. out.

John Hammond, mustered in April 3, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Patrick Hagan, mustered in Aug. 23, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Calvin Hummel, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Daniel Hant, mustered in Feb. 19, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William H. Hagar, mustered in Sept. 26, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Theodore Hixon, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; transferred to Co. B Oct. 9, 1864.

Joseph Houser, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute.

George Hayberry, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died Oct. 18, 1862, of wounds received at Antietam.

Henry Haines, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861.

Michael Horan, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 31, 1861.

John Henshall, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; disch, on surgeon Certif. Dec. 31, 1861.

William Hamberger, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 6, 1863.

John Johnson, mustered in Sept, 20, 1861; mis. at Spottsylvania, Court-House May 12, 1864; veteran.

Warren Jones, mustered in March 28, 1864; discharged by G.O. July 6, 1865.

John Kane, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Frederick Kobba, mustered in Sept. 26, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

William Keppler, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute. James Kelley, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute.

Samuel Kay, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; killed at South Mountain Sept. 14, 1862.

John Lancaster, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Elwood Lukins, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Charles Lysinger, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Jonathan Lybig, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel Lindner, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864 drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Richard Lewis, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died Aug. 11, 1863.

John W. Lonsdale, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862.

William Magee, mustered in April 1, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

T.J. Montgomery, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Lemuel Moode, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; captured at North Anna May 27, 1864; absent at must. out.

Joseph Mauchey, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Joseph Myers, mustered in Sept 26, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry C. Moore, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged by G.O. May 11, 1865.

J.H. Messersmith, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

John A. Michaels, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864; substitute.

John Magee, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

Patrick McNamara, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel McDade, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865 veteran.

William McDade, mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Daniel McDade, mustered in Feb. 16, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Peter McKenna, mustered in March 9, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James McLoughlin, mustered in Oct. 13, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Barnard McCluskey, mustered in Aug. 8, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

James McCurry, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute; discharged by G.O. July 11, 1865.

James McKenna, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 21, 1864; veteran.

Owen McConnell, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged 1863.

James McQuerness, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; killed accidentally Aug. 10, 1863.

Thomas McMeekin, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. June 11, 1863.

William McManamy, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. March 4, 1863.

Uriah McCoy, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 31, 1863.

Hugh McKessick, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861.

Robert Norris, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861.

Dennis O'Neil, mustered in Feb. 28, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Barnard O'Donnell, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died at Norristown, Pa., March 10, 1864; veteran.

George Olenwine, mustered in March 2, 1864; died at Washington, D.C., May, 1864.

David Peasley, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William Peterson, mustered in Oct. 13, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Amos M. Price, mustered in Sept. 27, 1863; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Alfred Porter, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute.

William Pollock, mustered in Sept. 12, 1861; disch, on surgeon certif. May 29, 1862.

William Rafferty, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Robert Robinson, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry Rhode, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. Sept. 27, 1864.

William Raifsnyder. mustered in Nov. 1, 1861; transferred to Co. K Nov. 11, 1864.

John Roshon, mustered in Aug. 24, 1862; died at Petersburg. Va., Aug. 22, 1864.

Owen Rex, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. June 23, 1863.

John Richards, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died Sept. 26, 1865; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, D.C.

Jacob Reider, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May 1, 1862.

Thomas Rhoads, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute.

Nathan Smith, mustered in March 26, 1865; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Thomas D. Smith, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Jacob Stadenmayer, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Joseph Spotts, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George Schlunkofer, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Everet H. Staunton, mustered in Oct. 13, 1864; substitute; wounded at Petersburg, Va., Dec. 8, 1864: absent at must. out.

Jacob Sands, mustered in Oct. 13, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Conrad Schnier, mustered in Oct. 6, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Isaiah F. Smedley, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864, exp. of term.

Hunter Smedley, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864, exp. of term.

Mifflin Smedley, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864, exp. of term.

Alfred Smith, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864. exp. of term.

John Sarba, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 27, 1865.

Winfield S. Smith, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 16, 1865.

William P. Schall, mustered in Sept. 20, 1801; discharged by S.O. Jan. 31, 1864 veteran.

Joseph Sarba, mustered in Oct. 21, 1861; transferred to Co. K Nov. 11, 1864.

Paul L. Sourwine, mustered in March 2, 1864; died at Harrisburg, Pa., May 22. 1864.

William H. Showalter, mustered in Sep. 20, 1861; killed at Wilderness May 6, 1864; veteran.

William Smith, mustered in March 25, 1865; substitute.

Samuel Sharpe, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 6, 1863.

Benjamin Smedley, mustered in Sept. 20 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. June 23, 1862.

Thomas B. Sutch, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May 21, 1862.

Benjamin Sutch, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 13, 1862.

Henry Sutch, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 15, 1863.

George Shaffer, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died Jan. 22, 1862.

Albert Smith, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out exp. of term.

Anthony Tyge, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864 drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

George W. Thomas, mustered in Sept. 26, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 13, 1865.

Stephen Thorp, mustered in June 2, 1863; discharged by G.O. May 24, 1865.

Hiram Vanfosser, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861: must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Aaron Valentine, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. July 25, 1865.

John H. Warst, mustered in March 27, 1865; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Philip Wampold, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; captured at North Anna May 27, 1864; absent at must. out; veteran.

Andrew Wherle, mustered in March 5, 1864; captured at North Anna May 27, 1864; absent at must. out.

John Ward, mustered in Sept. 29, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Charles Widger, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; must. out Sept. 19, 1864, exp. of term.

Jackson H. Walter, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 29, 1865

Ta'r Wannamaker, mustered in March 27, 1865; substitute; discharged by G.O. July 14, 1865.

John Weidknecht, mustered in Oct. 10, 1861; transferred to Co. B Oct. 9, 1864.

Samuel Weidknect, mustered in Oct. 10, 1861; transferred to Co. B Oct. 9, 1864.

William H. Weidner, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died at Newbern, N.C., April 16, 1862.

Josiah Weidner, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; died at Harrisburg, Pa., Dec. 2, 1861.

James Whitehead, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 16, 1863.

George Workheiser, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 2, 1862.

Joseph West, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute.

Hugh Ward, mustered in Feb. 16, 1865.

Daniel B. Yost, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; wounded at Spottsylvania Court House May 12, 1864; absent at must. out.

David H. Yerkis, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; killed at Wilderness May 6, 1864.

Francis Yeager, mustered in Sept. 20. 1861.

George W. Yarnell, mustered in Sept. 20, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May 4, 1863.

Franz F. Zerimer, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.


COMPANY F.

Recruited at Norristown.

Robert E. Taylor, capt., mustered in Sept. 2, 1861; res. July 27, 1862.

Lane S. Hart, capt., mustered in Sept. 2, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant to capt. July 25, 1862; to maj. July 21, 1864.

Jacob P. Brooke, capt., mustered in Sept. 2, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. to 1st lieutenant July 29, 1862; to capt. July 22, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William W. Owen, 1st lieutenant mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 2nd lieutenant July 23, 1862; to 1st lieutenant July 22, 1864; to capt. Co. D. Sept. 1, 1864.

Howard Bruce, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted from. 1st sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Sept. 2, 1864; to 1st lieutenant Oct. 31, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Joseph C. Read, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 2, 1861; promoted to capt. and c.s. July 22, 1862.

Henry Jacobs, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Nov. 1, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1866; veteran.

Allan H. Fileman, 2nd lieut, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted from com. sergt. to 2nd lieutenant July 22, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va., Aug. 30, 1864: veteran.

Benjamin White, 1st sergt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted from sergt. to 1st sergt. April 1, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William B. Hart, 1st sergt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted to capt. and A.A.G.U.S. Vols. April 1, 1865.

Jacob W. Reed, sergt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

James Y. Guyder, sergt., mustered in Oct. 17, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

William W. Fiet, sergt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

George W. Hilner, sergt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Thomas B. Garner, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 29, 1862.

Samuel P. Stephens, sergt., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted to com. sergt. Nov. 16, 1861.

Silas Kulp, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 17, 1865: veteran.

George S. Casselberry, corp., mustered in March 8, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 26, 1865.

William H. Verger, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Arnold Casselberry, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John J. Scholl, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Joseph Fizone, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Martin Hiltner, corp., mustered in July 22, 1863; promoted to corp. April 2, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John W. Truscott, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Thomas B. Yerger, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., Feb. 28, 1865; veteran.

Robert B. Lindsay, corp., mustered in Oct. 17, 1861; killed at Spottsylvania Court-House, May 12, 1864; veteran.

Edwin R. Worth, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864; veteran.

Josiah Wood, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; killed at Petersburg, Va., July 30, 1864; veteran.

William Montgomery, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged Dec., 1863, for wounds received in action.

Christopher Wyckoff, Corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted to q.m-sergt. Dec. 12, 1863.

Henry C. Hughes, corp., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May 21, 1862.

William L. Jones, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; died Dec. 11, 1862.

William C. Hansell, musician, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Franklin Lyle, musician, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; absent, at must out.

Privates.

Daniel Adams, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Francis Aldeman, mustered in March 9, 1864; discharged June 13, 1865, for wounds received in action.

Wilson Allen, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; died May 20, 1864, of wounds received at Po River, Va., May 19, 1864; veteran.

Henry H. Addleman, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; veteran.

Thomas G. Ashton, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; died June 9, 1864, of wounds received at Wilderness May 6, 1864.

George W. Addy, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

Samuel G. Arnold, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

John Batman, mustered in Feb. 17, 1864; absent, sick, at must. out.

Joseph Batman, mustered in Feb. 17, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James Bidlack, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. July 18, 1865.

Amile Bidler, mustered in April 1, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George Bowman, mustered in Feb. 18, 1864; absent, in hospital, at must out.

Mannassa J. Buyer, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Darran Blackmnore, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged on surg certif. Dec. 22, 1864.

Frank Bowie, mustered in Oct, 13, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 27, 1865.

Henry Bousman, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864, drafted; discharged on surgeon certif. April 13, 1865.

Edwin A. Bunons, mustered in Sept. 26, 1864; drafted; transferred to 291st Regiment P.V. Nov., 1864.

James F. Baker, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864.

Jeremiah W. Buck, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

Jessie M. Buckies, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

Adam Burgert, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

James S. Baird, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

John Boadwell, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May 21, 1862.

Judson Callendar, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; absent, in hospital, at must. out; veteran.

John B. Case, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Richard A. Cox, mustered in Mar. 8, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Thomas Coyle, mustered in April 1, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Charles Elwood, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., May 24, 1864, of wounds received in action; veteran.

John Camden, mustered in Feb. 27, 1864; died at Washington, D.C., Nov. 23, 1864, of wounds received at Hatcher's Run, Va., Oct. 27, 1864.

James Cremmer, mustered in Jan. 5, 1865.

Nathaniel Casselman, must, in Oct. 16, 1861; missing in action at Camden, N.C., April 19, 1862.

John Cox, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

William Comer, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; killed in action at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

William Derrickson, mustered in July 28, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Harvey H. Dexter, mustered in Oct. 8, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Uriah Dungan, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George W. Daub, must. out Oct. 16, 1861; absent, in Albany prison, N.Y., by sentence of general court-martial.

Jeremiah Dunlap, mustered in Jan. 26, 1865; died June 11, 1865; buried at Alexandria, Va., grave 3218.

Samuel Dresher, mustered in Feb. 18, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Isaac Detwiler, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out Oct. 15, 1864, exp. of term.

John A. Dumming, mustered in Sept. 29, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Sylvanus H. Daub, mustered in Feb. 18, 1864; died June 27, 1864, of wounds received at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864.

William Dresher, mustered in Feb. 18, 1864; died July 8, 1864, of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House, May 12, 1864.

William Doyle, mustered in March 5, 1864.

Charles Day, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

Martin H. Dunn, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; promoted to hosp. stewd. Nov. 16, 1861.

James Dolan, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged April 1, 1863, for wounds received in action.

Jesse Derough, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged, on surgeon certif. Jan. 1, 1862.

Samuel G. Daub, must, in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 6, 1863.

Thomas Deiner, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; disch Nov., 1862, for wounds received in action.

Robert Evans, mustered in March 31, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Alex. D. Earls, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

John W. Earp, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

William Franklin, mustered in Jan. 28, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William J. Faulkener, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; disch, by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Daniel Frease, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. June 28, 1863.

Jacob Fisher, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct., 1862.

William H. Griffith, mustered in April 1, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Henry L. Gerhart, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out Oct. 15, 1864, exp. of term.

William Gerhart, mustered in Oct. 19, 1861; must. out Nov. 27, 1864, exp. of term.

Samuel Gillespie, mustered in Feb. 27, 1864; killed at Petersburg June 29, 1864; buried in 9th Army Corps Cemetery, Meade Station, Va.

Washington Griffith, died at Annapolis, Md., April 1, 1864.

James Gibbons, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864.

Henry M. Groff, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged June, 1863.

Samuel Hendricks, mustered in March 9, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Milton Heller, mustered in Oct. 17, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

David Haas, mustered in Oct. 17, 1864; discharged by G.O. July 12, 1865.

David Heisey, mustered in Jan. 1, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Robert Heddifin, mustered in Jan. 25, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James Home, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Ephraim Home, mustered in Feb. 28, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John Holler, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George M. Hayden, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

George H. Holmes, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; discharged, date unknown.

Patrick Higgins, mustered in Sept. 16, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Edwin M. Hodson, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

George Hilton, mustered in March 5, 1864.

John H. Holmes, mustered in Oct. 10, 1861; died June 21, 1862.

George Y. Hansell, mustered in Oct. 16, 1864, transferred to reg. band Nov. 16, 1861.

Edwin H. John; mustered in Oct 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

James Jaggers, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May, 1862.

William Jackson, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861.

Philip Jacobs, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to reg. band Nov. 16, 1861.

Andrew J. Keins, mustered in Oct 8, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Aaron Koser, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; absent, in arrest, at muster out.

Sutton P. Kremer, mustered in Oct 24, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William H. Kurtz, mustered in Feb. 18, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Willoughby Kulp, mustered in Oct 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Frederick Kremer, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out Oct. 15, 1864, exp. of term.

Amos Kepner, mustered in Feb. 20, 1864; promoted to 2nd lieutenant U.S.C. troops Nov. 2, 1864.

Richard S. Kartsher, mustered in Jan.24, 1865; discharged by G.O. July 5, 1865.

Benneville Kulp, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Oct. 6, 1864.

Nathan Kelp, mustered in Oct 16, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 6, l863.

Charles Law, mustered in Oct 12, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George W. Lewis, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Oliver Lewis, mustered in Oct 8, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Hiram Lewis, mustered in Oct 7, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Frederick Lemkuhl, mustered in Jan. 25, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jeremiah Lemkuhl, mustered in Feb. 6, 1885; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Benjamin Leister, mustered in April 3, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Christian Loch, mustered in May 19, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 15, 1865.

William H. Lewis, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Feb. 2, 1865.

Henry S. Lents, mustered in Oct 16, 1861; killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Bruno Maudley, mustered in Jan. 25, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Peter L. Miller, mustered in March 10, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Enos G. Minard, mustered in Jan. 16, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Dwight W. Menell, mustered in Sept 30, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 22, 1864.

David Munsick, mustered in Oct 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 4, 1863.

Joseph C. Millhouse, mustered in Oct 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

Samuel McClennan, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel McCarter, mustered in Feb. 12, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

George K. McMiller, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Christ McCormick, mustered in Nov. 28, 1861; must out Nov. 27, 1864, exp. of term.

Reuben McKeever, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; died at Norristown, Pa., March 17, 1864; veteran.

William McIntire, mustered in Oct 16, 1861; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., April 10, 1864, grave 461.

James McGlinchy, mustered in Jan. 6, 1865.

Robert McGee, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 6, 1863.

Francis McFadden, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 6, 1863.

Hugh McGucken, mustered in Sept. -, 1861.

George W. Neece, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; absent, in arrest, at muster out.

Abraham Pilkington, mustered in Aug. 24, 1864; absent, in arrest, at muster out.

William Pyle, mustered in Jan. 26, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Patrick Quinn, mustered in April 1, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Edwin W. Reed, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 1865; veteran.

George M. Reed, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; must. out with company July 27, l865.

William O. Rider, mustered in Feb. 14, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Frederick Reigle, mustered in Feb. 20, 1864; must. out with company, July 27, 1865.

Joseph C. Rambo, mustered in June 1, 1861; absent at muster out.

Erastus Robb, mustered in Oct. 13, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William H.B. Ramsey, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out Oct. 15, 1864, exp. of term.

Henry Reinhart, mustered in Jan. 26, 1865.

Benjamin Rolen, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band Nov. 16, 1861.

Jarrett D. Scholl, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

James Shorthill mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Frank Sherer, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Daniel Smith, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

John F. Sayres, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Franklin Schreck, mustered in Sept. 23, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Joseph Seylor, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 5, 1865.

Jacob K. Shiffler, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

George Shuler, mustered in Sept. 29, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry V. Syock, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry Shaeffer, mustered in Jan. 25, 1865; died May 4, 1865; buried in National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.

Henry Shultz, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Jacob Sassaman, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to 2nd U.S. Cav., date unknown.

Samuel Taylor, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel D. Torrence, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out Oct. 14, 1864; exp. of term.

Albert Teaney, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 3, 1865.

John Time, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 5, 1865.

Charles Thompson, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band, Nov. 16, 1861.

Peter Urbine, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; died, date unknown.

James Waddle, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; substitute; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jacob Wheatley, mustered in Jan. 26, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Adam Wentzel, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

Howard Wilson, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

William S. Wicks, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Jonathan Wisler, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

George D. Williams, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company 27, 1865; veteran.

James Wyatt, mustered in Jan. 25, 1865; must. out with company July 27, 1865.

Samuel D. Weidner, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged by G.O. June 25, 1865; veteran.

Alexander Woodward, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Henry White, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., of wounds received in action, July 5, 1864.

Charles Wagoner, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865; buried in 9th Army Corps Cemetery Meade Station, Va.

Mark Widger, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct, 1862.

William White, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 28, 1863.

William Workizer, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; transferred to regimental band, Nov. 16, 1861.

William Wise, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; died Nov. 1862.

Joseph O. Young, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; must. out with company July 27, 1865; veteran.

John M. Young, mustered in Oct. 16, 1861; drowned by sinking of West Point, Oct. 26, 1862.

Below are the battles in which the Fifty-first Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers participated from its first entrance on the field to its retirement from camp-life, - -

Roanoke Island, February 7 and 8, 1862; Newbern, N.C., March 13 and 14, 1862; Camden, N.C., April 19, 1862; Bull Run, Va., August 29 and 30, 1862; Chantilly, Va., September 1, 1862; South Mountain, September 14, 1862; Antietam, September 17 and 18, 1862; Fredericksburg, December 12, 13 and 14, 1862; Vicksburg, Miss., June 16 to July 4, 1863; Jackson, Miss., July 8 to July 18, 1863; Campbell's Station, Tenn., November 16, 1863; Knoxville. Tenn., November 17 to December 5, 1863; Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; Spottsylvania, Va., May 12 to 14, 1864; Cold Harbor, Va., May 31 to June 8, 1864; Petersburg, Va., June 16 to August 18, 1864; Yellow Tavern, Va., August 19, 1864; Weldon Railroad, Va., August 21, 1864; Hatcher's Run, Va., October 27, 28 and 29, 1864; Petersburg, November 29, 1864, to April 2, 1865.

Skirmishes. - Kelly's Ford, 1862; Rappahannock, 1862; Warrenton, 1862; Sulphur Springs, Va., November 16, 1862; Sulphur Springs, August 24, 1862; Upperville, Va., 1862; Fairfax Court House, 1862; Big Black, Miss., July 6, 1863; Jackson, Miss., July 7, 1863; London, Tenn., November 15, 1863; Lenoir, Tenn., November 15, 1863; Rutledge, Tenn., December 16, 1863; Blain's

Cross-Roads, December 8, 1863; Poplar Grove Church, 1864; Bethesda Church, 1864; Peeble's Farm, 1864; Ream's Station, 1864; Weldon Railroad, 1864; besides a large number of minor importance, of which there are memoranda.

Below is a perfectly reliable statement of the distances traversed by the Fifty-first Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, by marches, transports and railway, as taken from a diary, -

From Bridgeport to Harrisburg, 95 miles; from Harrisburg to Annapolis, Md., 123 miles; from Aquia Creek to Fredericksburg, 15 miles; from Bealton to Culpepper Court House, Va., 15 miles; from Fredericksburg to Aquia Creek, 15 miles; from Baltimore, Md., to Paris, Ky., 778 miles; from Nicholasville, Ky., to Cairo, Ill., 508 miles; from Cairo, Ill., to Nicholas-vine, Ky., 508 miles; from Knoxville to Loudon, Tenn., 28 miles; from Nicholasville, Ky., to Bridgeport, Pa., 789 miles; from Bridgeport, Pa., to Harrisburg, Pa., 95 miles; from Harrisburg to Annapolis, Md., 123 miles; from Washington, D.C., to Harrisburg, 124 miles; from Harrisburg to Bridgeport, 95 miles: total by rail, 3311 miles. By transports from Annapolis to Fortress Monroe, thence to Roanoke Island, to Newbern, to landing at Albemarle Sound, back to Newbern, to Hatteras Inlet, back to Newbern, to Newport News, to Aquia Creek, to Baltimore, from Cairo to Vicksburg and back to Cairo, from City Point to Washington, from Washington to Alexandria: total, 5390 miles. By marches, total, 1738 miles; by water, total, 5390 miles; by railway, total, 3311 miles, - aggregate, 10,439 miles.

NOTE 1. -
"HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

"VICKSBURG, MISS., July 31, 1863.

"In returning the Ninth Corps to its former command, it is with pleasure that the general commanding acknowledges its valuable services in the campaign just closed. Aiming at Vicksburg, opportunely taking position to hold at bay Johnston's army, then threatening the forces investing the city, it was ready and eager to assume the aggressive at any moment.

"After the fall of Vicksburg it formed part of the army which drove Johnston from his position near the Big Black River into his intrenchments at Jackson, and after a siege of eight days compelled hint to fly in disorder from the Mississippi Valley.

"The endurance, valor and general good conduct of the Ninth Corps are admired by all, and its valuable co-operation in achieving the final triumph of the campaign is gratefully acknowledged by the Army of the Tennessee.

"Major-General Parke will cause the different regiments and battMontgomerys of his command to inscribe upon their banners and guidons 'Vicksburg and Jackson.'

"By order of

"MAJOR-GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

"T.S. BOWERS, A.A. Adjutant-General."

NOTE 2. - A hidden fellowship always lurked under the blue and tray. The following episode between the pickets on the line of the Rappahannock by men of the Fifty-first illustrates the fact:

"The best of feeling was expressed by both parties, and if a stray hog should by chance come within sight both Reb and Yank would start off in pursuit of the porker, and catch and slaughter it, and then divide it equally between them with many jocular remarks about the mode of living that each army was subject to. The commencement of cessation of hostilities by both sets of pickets began with hallooing to each ocher, then with the poking up of heads above their rude breastworks, and then by exposing themselves outside of the works, finally feeling some confidence in each other, and no shots being fired along either line, they began by advancing towards one another. Between the two picket-lines flowed a stream of water; this was the Rappahannock of the two parties; when both parties met near the stream the following introductory remarks took place, the Rebs asking:

"'Hallo, Yanks, what regiment?'

"Yank - 'The Fifty-first Pennsylvania.'

"Reb - 'D - good boys, too.'

"Yank - 'Say, Johnnies, what regimnents?'

"Reb - 'Eighty-eighth Tennessee, Second Georgia and Fourth Mississippi.'

" Yank - 'We've met you chaps before.'

"Reb - 'Yes, several times; come across the creek.'

"Yank - 'Can't see it; will you reach your hand out?'

"Reb - 'Yes, here; give us your hand; now, jump!' and over one went, and in a few minutes the Fifty-first boys were on the rebel side, and in return the rebels came over to our side, and all the civilities of an enlightened race were extended to one another.

"The pickets of both lines made a treaty between themselves not to fire a gun at each other during that relief, which would be until four o'clock the next morning, and with true faith was it carried out, although the flag of truce expired at 5 P. M. There was not a solitary shot fired until the next relief was put on the next morning."

Colonel Bolton made a farewell address to his command in the following order, as published to the regiment:

"HEADQUARTERS 51st Regiment P.V.V.

"ALEXANDRIA, VA., July 26, 1865.

"Officers and men of the 51st Regiment Penn. Vet. Vols.:

"In a very few days this organization will cease to exist. Our mission has been fulfilled, the armed hosts of the enemy no longer defy us, our long, fatiguing marches and hard fighting and weary watching for the enemy, day and night, are things of the past. You have, by your patriotic devotion, assisted in establishing a country, one, grand, glorious and indeed free. For nearly four years I have been associated with you, and for over one year of that time I have had the honor to be your commander. I would not be doing myself or you justice without giving expression to my feelings. A thousand thanks are due to both officers and men for your prompt obedience to all my orders, and my love is increased by the remembrance of your bravery and gallantry, as you have so often displayed on many a bloody field. But, alas! many of our organization now sleep in the valley of the dead; they sleep in honored graves. And it is with pleasure that we can think of their many virtues, their valor in the field, and their cheerful voice in camp, and hope that they have received their golden reward in heaven. When all looked gloomy, you wore cheerful faces; and when orders were exacting, you always cheerfully obeyed. When fighting against overwhelming odds, and by superior numbers compelled to retreat, you have ever evinced that noble, praiseworthy characteristic of a good soldier, 'repulsed, but not whipped,' 'defeated, but not conquered.' I feel sad to part with you; we may never meet again. You are about to return to your homes, and assume the garb and customs of private citizens. I am a young man; there are amongst you many who are old enough, perhaps, to be my father; time has whitened your hoary locks. I cannot part with you without urging that if you have acquired bad habits, incidental to camp life, to make a firm resolve to break off at once, and show to your friends at home that you can be as good and law-abiding citizens as you have been good, brave and exemplary soldiers.

"I need not particularize separately your many deeds; they all have been fairly won. The record you bear on your silken colors have been honestly won by the blood of your companions and the deep scars many of you bear upon your persons. You need no marble shaft to commemorate your many valorous deeds; your scars, your sacrifices and the noble acts of gallantry you have displayed will be your monument. Posterity will applaud you as the redeemers of our country, the world will admire your self-sacrificing devotion to your country.

"I now bid you farewell, and when the war of this life is over with us, when we shall have performed our last earthly mission, may we all meet in heaven is the earnest prayer of the colonel commanding.

"With my kindest wishes for your future prosperity, I bid you farewell.

"William J. BOLTON, Colonel Fifty-first P.V.V." 




Fifty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

53rd Regiment - On the 21st of August, 1861, John R. Brooke, of Pottstown, Montgomery Co., was commissioned colonel of the Fifty-third Regiment. He had served as captain of the Fourth (three months') Regiment. Recruiting was immediately commenced, and on the 28th of September the first company was mustered into the service of the United States. Company A was recruited in Pottstown, B in Chester and Montgomery Counties, C in Blair and Huntingdon, D in Centre and Clearfield, E in Carbon and Union, F in Luzerne, G in Potter, H in Northumberland, I in Juniata and K in Westmoreland. During the period of its organization it occupied Camp Curtin, and while here did provost guard duty in Harrisburg. The following field officers were selected: John R. Brooke, colonel; Richard McMichael, of Reading. Berks Co., lieutenant-colonel; and Thomas Yeager, of Allentown, Lehigh Co., major. Charles P. Hatch, of Philadelphia, was appointed adjutant.

On the 7th of November it moved to Washington and encamped north of the capitol. On the 27th it crossed the Potomac, went into camp near Alexandria, and was assigned to a brigade commanded by General William H. French. It remained here during the winter of 1861 -62, and was constantly drilled and disciplined in the routine of a soldier's duty, It participated in the general advance of the Army of the Potomac in March, 1862, arriving at Manassas Junction, which had been evacuated by the rebels on the 12th.

On the 21st it was marched to Warenton Junction to support a reconnaissance of Howard's brigade, which was being pushed towards the Rappahannock. The object having been accomplished, on the 23d it returned to Manassas and from thence to Alexandria. Upon the reorganization of the army the regiment was assigned to the Third Brigade,(8*) First Division, Second Corps. On the 3d of April it was transferred with McClellan's army to the Peninsula, and formed part of the reserve division during the siege of Yorktown.

The enemy having retreated, on the 4th of May the regiment marched to Yorktown, and late on the afternoon of the same day moved through a pelting storm of rain towards Williamsburg. It was ordered back on the 6th and remained until the 12th, when it was transported to West Point, at the head of York River. Later in the month it assisted to build the grape-vine bridge across the Chickahominy. The regiment took a prominent part in the engagement at Fair Oaks on the 1st of June, where, though surprised and thrown into temporary confusion, it rallied and in a short time forced the enemy from his line. Its conduct on this occasion was such as to elicit the commendation of the generals commanding. It suffered a severe loss in the death of Major Yeager, who was killed in the early part of the action while gallantly leading his men. The regiment lost ninety-six men in killed, wounded and missing.

It bivouacked upon the battle-ground and supported a battery in position on the York River Railroad. On the 27th it moved to the right, where a deadly conflict was raging, and was thrown forward to the assistance of Porter's troops. It crossed the Chickahominy and came under fire of the enemy at Gaines' Mill. Forming in line of battle, the command covered the withdrawal of the troops, and at midnight silently recrossed the Chickahominy. Here began the memorable "change of base," in which it was the arduous duty of Sumner's corps to cover the rear of the retreating army. The post of honor and of danger - the rear of the rear-guard - was assigned to the Third Brigade. At Peach Orchard, on the 29th, it participated in a fierce engagement, in which a number of casualties occurred, but none were killed. Immediately after the close of the action General Sumner rode up and complimented the regiment for its bravery, saying, "You have done nobly, but I knew you would do so." Moving to Savage Station, Sumner made another stand to check the enemy. The regiment occupied a position in a wood, parallel to the railroad, and was fortunately favored by the high-ranged shot and shell of the rebel artillery. After a short but desperate encounter the enemy withdrew, and at midnight the line of retreat was silently resumed.

The march now began to test the endurance of the troops, and the situation became one fraught with peril. One small brigade, standing fearlessly alone in midnight darkness, was holding in check, almost at the point of the bayonet, one-half the rebel army, while friends from whom no succor could be expected were swiftly moving to the rear. Silently the command plunged into the deep shadows of White Oak Swamp. At daylight the regiment reached White Oak Creek, beyond which was its corps in bivouac. Crossing the creek, it immediately began destroying the bridge. The advance of the enemy soon made its appearance, and commenced skirmishing, but was prevented from crossing the stream. Several of his battMontgomerys having been placed in position, opened fire and were very annoying. Although not actively engaged, the regiment had several killed and wounded.

Withdrawing at midnight, the Fifty-third arrived at Malvern Hill on the morning of July 1st, and was almost constantly under fire, although it did not participate in the engagement. The duty assigned to it, in the retreat from the Chickahominy to the James, was of such an important nature as to merit and receive the thanks of the commanding general as well as of the intermediate commanders, and Colonel Brooke was highly complimented for the skillful and soldierly qualities displayed in conducting his command successfully through so many perils. Arriving at Harrison's Landing the regiment remained until the 16th of August. Here the Sixty-fourth New York was temporarily attached to the Fifty-third for the purposes of drill, discipline and camp duty, all under command of Major Octavius S. Bull, who had been promoted to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Major Yeagher, Colonel Brooke being in command of the brigade and Lieutenant Colonel McMichael absent on account of sickness.

Moving via Yorktown to Newport News, it embarked for Alexandria, where it arrived on the 28th, and encamped on the following day at Lee's Farm, near the Aqueduct Bridge. The cannonade of the contending forces at Bull Run was distinctly heard, and the men were eager to again meet the foe. At two A.M. of the 30th, in light marching order, the command moved towards Centreville. But the battle had been fought, and Pope's army was retreating to the defenses of Washington. Reaching (Centreville on the 31st, it was promptly deployed in line of battle, protecting the exposed flanks of the Union army. Here again Sumner's corps was interposed between the enemy and our retreating troops. Near Vienna the regiment, and one section of a battery were thrown forward on the Leesburg turnpike to guard the flank of the column against any sudden attack of the enemy. A force of rebel cavalry made a dash upon the Union troops between the pike and Chain Bridge, entirely separating the regiment from the main column. Colonel Brooke, seeing the danger and the difficulty of cutting his way through, moved his command at double-quick down the pike and thereby insured its safety before the enemy discovered the manoeuvre. On the 3d of September it rejoined the army at Tenallytown. On the 11th, General French, who had endeared himself to the troops of his brigade, was assigned to the command of a division, and was succeeded by Colonel Brooke.

The enemy was now marching into Maryland, and the Third Brigade moved rapidly through Washington to Frederick, and thence to South Mountain, where it was held in reserve during the battle. On the 15th it moved in pursuit, skirmishing during the morning with the enemy's cavalry, drove him through Boonesboro' and Keedysville, and encountered his army in strong force on the highlands beyond Antietam Creek. The following day was occupied chiefly in manoevring for position, the regiment being under artillery fire and suffering some casualties. At four A.M.of the 17th the regiment left its position on the Keedysville road, and moving a mile to the right, crossed Antietam Creek at a ford. It occupied the extreme right of the division. In front was the "sunken road" occupied by the enemy's first line. His second line was protected by a stone wall on the hill beyond. To the right and rear was an orchard, immediately in front of which was the cornfield where, subsequently, the battle raged with great fury. It was important to drive the enemy from this position, and the Fifty-third was chosen for the charge. Changing front to the rear, and advancing at double-quick, in a short but desperate contest it drove him from his well-chosen ground. The regiment was subsequently engaged in the hottest of the fight and shared the varying fortunes of the day. The position gained was of great importance, and was held with tenacity until the regiment was ordered to the support of a battery. Lieutenant Weaver, of Company K, a brave young officer, was mortally wounded. The loss in killed and wounded was twenty-eight.

On the 22nd it forded the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, and encamped on the following day on Bolivar Heights. Here the wasted energies of the troops were recruited, and frill rations and clothing, which had been much needed, were furnished. On the 16th of October it participated, under command of Major Bull, in a reconnaissance to Charlestown, skirmishing with and driving the enemy and occupying the town. Captain Mintzer, of Company A, was appointed provost-marshal of the place, who at once instituted a search, and captured a number of prisoners. The object of the reconnoisance having been accomplished, the command returned to camp. Moving from Bolivar Heights on the 30th of October, it crossed the Shenandoah River, and proceeded down the Loudon Valley, participating in a skirmish with the enemy on the 4th at Snicker's Gap, driving him out and occupying it until the column had passed. It arrived at Warrenton on the 9th, when General Burnside assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, and projected the movement upon Fredericksburg. The regiment proceeded to Falmouth, where it arrived on the 19th, and performed provost guard duty until the 11th of December, when it left quarters and took position nearly opposite Fredericksburg in support of the battMontgomerys that were engaged in bombarding the town. Early on the 12th it crossed the river, and, forming a skirmish line, drove the enemy's sharpshooters out of the city, with the loss of one mortally wounded, when it was relieved, and rested for the night on the river-bank. Early on the morning of Saturday, the 13th, under a dense fog, the regiment marched into the city and halted for half an hour under fire of rebel artillery. The fight was opened at the front, near Marye's Heights, by French's division, which was repulsed. Soon after the Third Brigade, led by the Fifty-second, moved, amidst a shower of deadly missiles, by the right flank, up St. Charles Street, and formed in line of battle along the edge of the town. The rebel infantry, but a few hundred yards in front, was protected by a stone wall along a sunken road, while, immediately above, the hill-tops were bristling with cannon. At the word of command, Colonel Brooke, at the head of his regiment, led the charge, under a storm of shot and shell that swept the ranks with terrible effect. But, undismayed, they closed up and pressed steadily on till they reached a position within one hundred and fifty yards of the enemy's lines, which was held, despite every effort to dislodge them, even after their ammunition was spent. At evening, when the battle was over and the day was lost, what remained of the regiment retired silently from its position and returned to the city. It went into battle with two hundred and eighty-three effective men. Of these, one hundred and fifty-eight were either killed or wounded. Among the former were Lieutenants Cross, McKiernan and Kerr, and the latter, Captains Coulter and Eichholtz and Lieutenants Potts, Root, Hopkins and Smith.

The regiment now returned to its old position as provost guard to Falmouth. On the following week it formed part of a detachment, under command of Colonel Brooke, that crossed the river, under a flag of truce, for the purpose of burying the dead. During the two days occupied in this work nine hundred and thirteen were interred and six were dispatched to their friends. The rebel soldiers had stripped the bodies of the dead in a most heartless manner. In many cases fingers were cut off to get possesiun of rings. The Fifty-third remained at Falmouth until February 1, 1863. While here three companies, under command of Major Bull, were detailed as provost guard at division headquarters. The major was assigned to the staff of General Couch, and remained successively with Generals Couch, Hancock, Hays, Warren, and again with Hancock in the Wilderness campaign, until the 18th of May, 1864.

On the 28th of April the regiment moved on the Chancellorsville campaign, and, crossing the Rappahannock at United States ford, for three days was actively engaged, suffering considerable loss. Upon the withdrawal of the army it returned to its old camping-ground near Falmouth. On the 14th of June the Fifty-third, which was now attached to the Fourth Brigade of the First Division of the Second Corps, left camp, and marched to Banks' Ford to watch the movements of the enemy, who was about entering on his Pennsylvania campaign. Withdrawing from the ford when it was found that the rebel columns had passed, the command moved forward with the army, and on the 20th made a forced march to Thoroughfare Gap, where it remained in position until the 25th, when the enemy attacked, driving in the pickets, and, as our column had now passed, the command was withdrawn. Marching rapidly towards Gettysburg, it arrived upon the field at eight o'clock on the morning of the 2nd of July, and took position in rear of the line of the Third Corps, then forming. Later in the day it moved to the left, near Little Round Top, and at three o'clock P. M. became hotly engaged. A rebel battery, posted upon an eminerce beyond a wheat-field, had become very annoying to our troops. Colonel Brooke led a charge, in the face of its destructive fire, to capture it or drive it away. At the word of command the men dashed forward, and, with loud shouts, drove the enemy, scattering his ranks, and gained the position. The lines upon his right and left had failed to advance as far, and, discovering that the enemy was taking prompt advantage of his fearfully exposed flanks, the colonel reluctantly ordered his men to retire to his first position, which was executed, but not without serious loss. On the 3d the regiment was under a heavy artillery fire, but was not actively engaged. In this battle the command was much reduced in number, three companies being still on detached duty, and the remainder having but one hundred and twenty-four men. Of this number, only forty-five escaped uninjured. Six were killed, sixty-seven wounded and six missing. Of the latter were Captains Dimm and Hatfield and Lieutenants Pifer, Shields, Root, Smith, Whitaker and Mann and Sergeant-Major Rutter.

Remaining upon the battle-field until noon of the 5th, the regiment marched in pursuit of the retreating enemy, and arrived on the 11th at Jones' Cross-Roads, near which the rebel army was in position. In the evening it advanced in line, driving back the enemy's skirmishers, and during the following night threw up breast-works. On the 14th it was deployed in line at right angles to the Williamsport road, and advanced cautiously, only to discover that the Rebels had vacated their works and fled. After remaining for a few days in Pleasant Valley, it crossed the Potomac, and, marching down the Loudoun Valley, made descents upon Ashby's and Manassas Gaps, passed White Plains, New Baltimore and Warrenton, and arrived on the 1st of August at Morrisville, where it went into camp. In the toilsome campaigns which followed, ending at Mine Run, the regiment participated, encountering the enemy at Rappahannock Station and at Bristow, and losing some men. It went into winter-quarters at Stevensburg, where the men re-enlisted, and on the 27th of December proceeded to Harrisburg, where they were dismissed for a veteran furlough. Upon their return to the army they again encamped near Stevensburg in their old quarters, where they remained until the opening of the spring campaign.

On the 4th of May, 1864, the regiment broke camp, and, crossing the Rapidan at Ely's Ford, marched to Chancellorsville. On the following day it moved forward and confronted the enemy in his earth-works, and again on the 6th was engaged, but without serious loss. At evening of the 9th it moved forward to the Po River, which it crossed, and at once met the enemy, the contest being continued with spirit for several hours, resulting in considerable loss to the command, but, owing to the woods and undergrowth taking fire from the explosion of the shells, without any decided advantage. Late on the evening of the 11th, withdrawing from its position on the Po, it proceeded about six miles towards Spottsylvania.

There, on the following morning, it stood in column in readiness to join in the grand charge of the veteran Second Corps upon the strongly fortified position of the enemy. Advancing silently until within a short distance of his works, the well-formed lines rushed forward with wild hurrahs, and, in face of the desperate defense offered, carried the position, capturing an entire division. No more brilliant or decisive charge was made during the campaign than this. Captain Whitney and Lieutenant Foster were among the killed. Colonel Brooke was promoted to brigadier-general soon after this engagement, Major Bull to lieutenant-colonel, and Captain Dimm to major; subsequently, upon the muster out of service of the latter, Captain William M. Mintzer was made major.

The regiment remained in the vicinity of Spottsylvania, throwing up earth-works at different points and almost constantly under fire, until the 25th of May, when it crossed the Pamunkey; thence to Tolopotomny Creek, and on the 2nd of June arrived at Cold Harbor. It was pushed close up to the enemy's entrenched line and immediately threw up breast-works. At five o'clock on the morning of the 3d a furious but futile effort was made to drive the enemy from his position. Two other gallant charges were made, wherein men never marched to death with stouter hearts; but all in vain. In these charges the Fifty-third suffered severely. General Brooke, commanding the brigade was severely wounded by a grape-shot in the hand and thigh. Captain Dimm and Lieutenant Pifer were also severely wounded.

On the night of June 12th the regiment marched, and, crossing the Chickahominy and James Rivers, arrived on the evening of the 16th in front of Petersburg. In the afternoon a charge was ordered upon the enemy's strong works, which was gallantly executed, but was repulsed, the Fifty-third losing in this desperate struggle nearly seventy men. On the 22nd an attempt was made to establish a new line, which proved alike unsuccessful. For several weeks digging and the construction of defensive works constituted the principal occupation of the troops.

On the 26th of June the regiment moved with the brigade to the right of the line, beyond the James River, and for two weeks was engaged in promiscuous skirmishing along the rebel works, after which it returned to the neighborhood of Petersburg. On the 12th of August the command again returned to the left bank of the James, where it skirmished heavily with the enemy until the 21st, when it recrossed the James and the Appomattox, and, passing in rear of the army to the extreme left of the line, commenced demolishing the Weldon Railroad, near Ream's Station. Five miles had already been destroyed when the enemy appeared in force, and a line of battle was hastily formed to repel his advance and protect the working-parties. His first charge was gallantly repulsed. But reforming and massing his troops in heavy columns, he again struck with overpowering force upon the Union lines, and was partially successful in breaking them. But his advantage was gained at a fearful cost, and he was finally forced to abandon the contest, and the Union forces retired to their lines in front of Petersburg. During the autumn and winter months the regiment was engaged in severe duty in the front lines before the besieged city. On the 18th of September, Colonel McMichael having been discharged upon the expiration of his term of service, Lieutenant-Colonel Bull was promoted colonel, Major Mintzer lieutenant-colonel, and Captain Philip H. Shreyer major. In November, upon the muster out of service of the colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel Mintzer was made colonel, Captain George C. Anderson lieutenant-colonel, and Captain George D. Pifer major.

On the 25th of March, 1865, the regiment moved on its last campaign, proceeding directly to the Boydton Plank-Road, where, on the 31st, it was briskly engaged. The Fifth Corps was now actively employed in pushing the enemy from his foot-hold about Petersburg, and in this the Second Corps was called to its aid. In the operations at Five Forks the regiment joined, charging the enemy's lines, driving him in confusion, and taking possession of a portion of the South Side Railroad. In this engagement Major Pifer led the Fifty-third, Colonel Mintzer having been placed temporarily in command of a detachment skillfully deployed to deceive a division of the enemy and prevent him from changing his position. For the success attained in this service Colonel Mintzer was promoted brevet brigadier-general. Following up the retreating enemy, the regiment participated in the capture of his

wagon-trains at Deep Creek, on the 6th of April, and was at the front on the day of time surrender of the rebel army. Encamping for a short time near Burkesville, it proceeded from thence, through Richmond and Fredericksburg, to Alexandria, participated in the grand review of the armies at Washington, on the 23d of May, and was finally mustered out of service on the 30th of June, 1865.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

John R. Brooke, col., mustered in Nov. 5, 1861; promoted to brig.-gen. May 12, 1864; to brev. maj.-gen. Aug. 1, 1864.

William M. Mintzer, col., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. A to maj. June 2, 1862: to lieutenant-col. Sept. 29, 1864; to col. Oct. 30, 1864; to brev. brig.-gen. March 13, 1865; must. out with Regiment June 30, 1865.

Richards McMichael, lieutenant-col., mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. May 19, 1864.

George C. Anderson, lieutenant-col., mustered in Oct. 29, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. K to maj. Sept. 20, 1864; to lieutenant-col. Nov. 10, 1864; must. out with Regiment June 30, 1865.

Thomas Yeager, maj., mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; killed at Fair Oaks, Va., June 1, 1862.

S. Octavius Bull, maj., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. A to maj. June 2, 1862; com. lieut,-col. May 17, 1864; col. Sept. 18, 1864; not mustered; must. out Nov. 1, 1864, expiration of term.

George D. Pifer, maj., must, in Oct. 10, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. I Dec. 13, 1864; must. out with Regiment June 30, 1865.

Charles P. Hatch, adj., mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. July 24, 1864.

Samuel H. Rutter, adjt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from private Co. A to sergt. maj. Dec. 24, 1863; to lieutenant and adjt. Sept. 5, 1864; absent on detached service in V.R.C. at must. out; veteran.

Jacob Rice, quartermaster, mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; must. out Oct. 12, 1864, expiration of term.

Theophilus T. Davis, quartermaster, mustered in Nov. 4, 1861; promoted from private Co. I to com. sergt. Dec. 24, 1863; to 1st lieutenant and quartermaster Oct. 31, 1864; must. out with Regiment June 30, 1865; veteran.

John Fromberger, surgeon, mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; res. Jan. 28, 1862.

M.J. McKinnon, surgeon, mustered in Feb. 15, 1862; res. Jan. 26, 1863.

George W. Jackson, surgeon, mustered in Feb. 24, 1863; discharged on surgeon certif. Aug. 12, 1864.

Charles W. Spayd, surgeon, mustered in Oct. 1, 1862; promoted from asst. surgeon Aug. 29, 1864; must. out with Regiment June 30, 1865.

William B. Wynne, asst. surgeon, mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; promoted to surgeon 159th Regiment P.V. Oct. 29, 1862.

J.P. Burchfield, asst. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 1, 1862; promoted to surgeon 83d Regiment P.V. April 3, 1863.

Jacob C. Gatchell, asst. surgeon, mustered in Oct. 17, 1864; must. out with regiment, June 30, 1865.

Daniel Barber, chap., mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; res. July 7, 1862.

J.R. Taylor Gray, chap., mustered in June 16, 1865; must. out with regiment, June 30, 1865.

Thomas Reifsnyder, sergt.-maj., mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; promoted to 1st lieutenant Co. D, Dec. 14, 1862.

G.W. Butterworth, sergt. maj., mustered in March 2, 1864; pro; from sergt. Co. G, June 12, 1865; must. out with regiment, June 30, 1865; veteran.

Levi J. Fritz, sergt.-maj., mustered in Dec. 22, 1863; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. A. Oct. 8, 1864.

M.M. Brannock, sergt.-maj., mustered in Dec. 22, 1863; transferred to Co. K, April 7, 1865; veteran.

Albert H. Hess, sergt.-maj., mustered in Dec. 22, 1863; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. E, June 12, 1865.

Mahlon S. Ludwig, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. B. March 1, 1863.

John S. Weand. quartermaster- sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from private Co. A, Nov. 1, 1864; must. out with regiment, June 30, 1865.

John W. Riley, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; promoted from sergt. to quartermaster-sergt. Dec. 23, 1864; transferred from 140th Regiment P.V.; discharged by G.O. June 6, 1865.

Lewis R. Bland, com. sergt., mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co, B, April 28, 1862.

Thomas E. Clark, com. sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from private Co. A, Dec. 10, 1864; absent, on furlough, at muster out.

J. Wilson Barnett, com. sergt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1861; transferred to 10th Regiment U.S. colored troops.

Benjamin J. Cushing, com. sergt., mustered in Oct. 29, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. G, Sept. 21, 1864; veteran.

W.W.Dentler, com. sergt, mustered in Oct. 23, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. H, Dec. 8, 1864; veteran.

Albert Lorenz, hosp. stewart, mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, expiration of term.

John H. Foltz, hosp. steward, mustered in Oct. 10, 1861; promoted from private Co. I, Nv. 16, 1864; must. out with regiment, June 30, 1865; veteran.

John Caldwell, principal musician, mustered in Oct. 23, 1861; promoted from musician Co. H. Nov. 1, 1864; must. out with regiment, June 30, 1865; veteran.


COMPANY A.

Recruited at Pottstown, Montgomery County.

S. Octavius Bull, capt., mustered in Sept. 18. 1861; pro, to maj. June 2, 1862.

William M. Mintzer, capt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant to capt. June 2, 1862; to lieutenant-col Sept. 29, 1864.

Charles L. Geiger, capt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to 1st sergt.; to 2nd lieutenant Sept. 26, 1864; to 1st lieutenant Oct. 8, 1864, to capt. Oct. 30, 1864; must. out with company, July 30, 1865; veteran.

John T. Potts, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from 2nd lieut, Nov. 1, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. July 31, 1863.

John H. Root, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. to 2nd lieutenant June 2, 1862, to 1st lieutenant April 23, 1864; must. out Oct. 8, 1864; expiration of term.

Levi J. Fritz, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Dec. 22, 1863; promoted from quartermaster sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Oct. 8, 1864; to 1st lieutenant Oct. 30, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 15, 1865; veteran.

Tobias B. Schmearer, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept 18, 1861; promoted from corp. to sergt.; to 1st serg. Oct. 1, 1864; to 2nd lieutenant Oct. 30, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Eli K. Nagle, 1st sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to corp.; to sergt. July 1, 1864; to 1st sergt. Nov. 9, 1863; must. out with company, June 30, 1865; veteran.

Evan Fryer, sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to Corp.; to sergt. Nov. 1, 1864; must. out with company, June 30, 1865; veteran.

George W. Rahn, sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to Corp.; to sergt. Nov. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Joseph Spang, sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to Corp.; to sergt. April 1, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Jonas Brickart, sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promotedto Corp. July 1, 1864; to sergt. May 7, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865 veteran.

William P. Yergey, sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, exp. of term.

George W. Shingle, sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from private to sergt.; killed in action March 31, 1865; veteran.

William H. Graham, sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from private to sergt.; killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; veteran.

Edward K. Weand, sergt., must, in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from corp. to sergt.; captured, date unknown; died April 31, 1865.

Joseph Davis, sergt., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Christian G. Lessig, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to Corp. July 1, 1864; wounded Nov. 4, 1864; absent at muster-out; veteran.

David Houck, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to corp. Oct 1, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Benneville Harp, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted Corp. Jan. 1, 1865 must. out with company, June 30, 1865; veteran.

John H. Fryer, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; buried at National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; veteran.

James McFarland, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to Corp.; killed in action March 31, 1865; veteran.

Josiah Godshall, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to corp.; captured died while prisoner, date unknown; veteran.

Cornelius Uxley, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

George Sheets, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Frederick Buyer, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Charles W. Gausline, corp., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Jonas W. Burns, mus., mustered in Sept 18, 1861; promoted from private; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Franklin Detwiler, mus., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted from private must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Thomas Donohoe, mus., mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

John Ayers, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out with company, June 30, 1865; veteran.

Privates.

Joseph Ashdale, mustered in July 21, 1864; substitute.; discharged by G.O June 3, 1865.

Peter Arnold, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Wallace Bradford, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; wounded April 2, 1865 absent at muster out.

Philip Brown, mustered in Sept. 3, 1864; substitute; must. out with company, June 30, 1865.

William Bean, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps.; disch, Aug. 7, 1864.

J.A. Brenneman, mustered in Sept. 2, 1864; substitute; wounded; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

L. Burkensbrock, mustered in Aug. 14, 1863; missing in action, May 10, 1864;

Justice Backus, mustered in Aug. 14, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James Boyle, mustered in Sept. 3, 1863; missing in action, May 10, 1864.

Meredith Bachelder, mustered in Aug. 19, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Abner Bradbury, mustered in Feb. 23, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John C. Burdice, mustered in Feb. 13, 1864; absent, sick, at mnuster out.

Monroe Burdice, mustered in Feb. 13, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

Henry F. Butts, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, expiration of term.

John H. Boyer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, expiration of term.

James F. Boyer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, expiration of term.

William Beddoe, mustered in Aug. 10, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Lenaias S. Beeker, mustered in Aug. 27, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

James C. Boston, mustered in Sept. 1, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Henry Benner, mustered in Aug. 24, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

G.W. Bechtel, mustered in March 1, 1864; died March 28, 1865.

George W. Beard, mustered in Dec. 22, 1863; died of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864; veteran.

Franklin Belle, mustered in March 17, 1865; killed in action, April 4, 1865.

Michael Boyer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster out roll.

Jacob K, Boyer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster out roll.

Owen Boyer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster out roll.

Milton Brant, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; died Dec. 6, 1861; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, Washington, D.C.

James Brady, mustered in Jan. 19, 1865; not on muster-out roll.

Collins Boyer, mustered in June 1, 1864.

Patrick Collins. mustered in Aug. 24, 1863; absent, on furlough, at muster out.

J.B. Counterman, mustered in Aug. 25, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Thomas A. Clark, mustered in July 18, 1863; wounded May 12, 1864; absent at muster out.

McClure Cowen, mustered in March 4, 1864; wounded June 7, 1864; absent at muster out.

William Crane, mustered in Sept. 18, 1863; prisoner from Oct. 26, 1863, to May 6, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James Cane, mustered in Sept. 3, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

George W. Carpenter, mustered in Sept. 7, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Thomas E. Clark, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to com. sergt. Dec. 10, 1864; veteran.

Samuel H. Campbell, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; veteran.

George Comfort, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; died Sept. 18, 1862; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, Washington, D.C.

Elhannan Cook, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

William Carr, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Benjamin Day, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James R. Dye, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James Donolled, mustered in Aug. 24, 1863; absent, wounded, since March 25, 1865.

Charles Dugan, mustered in July 24, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John L. Detwiler, mustered in Jan. 30, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 19, 1865.

James P. Dowd, mustered in Aug. 31, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

James Dunwoodie, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Meyers Dailey, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; died Sept. 17, 1862; buried in National Cemetery, Antietam, Md., section 28, lot A, grave 11.

Abel Detwiler, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Gottlieb Deagle, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; died Sept. 17, 1862; buried in National Cemetery, Antietam, Md., section 26, lot A, grave 12.

Solomon Davis, mustered in July 2, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. May 3O 1865.

Thomas Day, mustered in Jan. 19, 1865; not on muster-out roll.

Mahlon H. Engle, mustered in Jan. 30, 1865; absent, sick, at muster out.

Philip Eizel, mustered in Aug. 31, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 22, 1865.

William H. Eastwood, mustered in Aug. 10. 1863; discharged by G.O. June 19, 1865.

Ephraim Engle, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, exp. of term.

George Edwards, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Henry F. Fryer, mustered in Jan. 30, 1864; died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 11, 1865.

James Foulk, mustered in Feb. 2, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 21, 1865.

Thomas Forest, mustered in Sept. 18, 1863; absent, wounded, at muster out.

Samuel Fielding, mustered in Aug. 25, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Joseph Fansey, mustered in Sept. 11, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Daniel B. Foreman, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

John H. Fryer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; killed in action June 16, 1864.

Richard Gabel, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Francis S. Garber, mustered in Jan. 30, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Jacob S. Geiger, mustered in March 1, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 29, 1865.

Owen R.A. Gue, mustered in June 21, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James Gallagher, mustered in Aug. 21, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Frederick Guthrie, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Goldsmith, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Richard Gabriel, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Eli Graham, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; killed at Fair Oaks, Va., June 1, 1862; buried in National Cemetery, Seven Pines, section B, lot 53.

Henry A. Holt, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; absent, sick, at muster out.

David G. Hoffman, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; wounded at Spottsylvania

Court-House May 10, 1864; absent at muster out.

John S. Heft, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

John Heninger, mustered in Feb. 13, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Ferdinand Herman, mustered in Aug. 17, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

William L. Hobart, mustered in March 2, 1865; drafted; discharged by G.O., date unknown.

George O. Hendricks, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; died July 18, 1864, of wounds received in action July 17, 1864; buried at Portsmouth Grove, R.I.

George W. Holt, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; died Nov. 28, 1864; veteran.

Israel W. Jones, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Edward Johnson, mustered in Aug. 13, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

William P. Johnson, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; killed in action Nov. 28, 1864; veteran.

Charles W.I. Keyser, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Jonah Keim, must, in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, exp. of term.

Thomas Kirkendall, mustered in Sept. 1864; substitute; disch, by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Henry Klein, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Henry Lindermnan, mustered in Sept. 5, 1864; absent, on furlough, at muster out.

John Lontzenheiser, mustered in Feb. 4, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Sylvester J. Linn, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; paroled prisoner; absent at muster out.

David J. Logan, mustered in March 3, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

Wayne Leightin, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Enos D. Longake, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; died of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House May 10, 1864; veteran.

Englebert Lessig, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

William Lessig, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

George W.D. Long, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

John Moore, mustered in April 8, 1864; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 10, 1864; absent at muster out.

William C. Sliller, mustered in Aug. 10, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Thomas Miles, mustered in Aug. 26, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Thomas Mater, mustered in Aug. 26, 1863; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 10, 1864; discharged July 11, 1865, to date June 30, 1865.

Henry Miller, mustered in Sept. 30, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Edward Mallon, mustered in Aug. 24, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

Brooks Minker, mustered in Aug. 24, 1863; wounded at Spottsvlvania Court-House May 10, 1864; absent at muster out.

John Martin, mustered in Aug. 24, 1863; wounded Jan. 20, 1865; absent at muster out.

Warren Missimer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1834, exp. of term.

Sylvester E. Missimer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, exp. of term.

Price Maurice, mustered in Aug. 23, 1864; substitute; killed in action Oct. 28, 1864.

Hans'r Missimer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Andrew Missimer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Cornelius McKain, must. out Feb. 23, 1864; missing in action June 16, 1864.

Patrick McDonald, mustered in Sept. 6, 1864; substitute.

-----McCallicher, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

George Nayler, mustered in Sept. 18, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Jacob Nagle, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

John J. Ott, mustered in Sept. 16, 1864; substitute; absent, on furlough, at muster out.

Charles Ogeard, mustered in Aug. 13, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Ox, mustered in Sept. 3, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Benjamin Peyton, mustered in Sept. 3, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

William Parsons, mustered in Sept. 5, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Thomas Price, mustered in Sept. 3, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Francis P. Potts, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out. Nov. 7, 1864, exp. of term.

Holman Potts, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

James Quinn, mustered in Sept. 16, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

David Robinson, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Jerome W. Ruth, mustered in Feb. 10, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Reinhold Rhoads, mustered in Jan. 24, 1864; must. out. with company June 30, 1865.

William Riley, mustered in Sept. 3, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

John H. Rutter, mustered in Feb. 12. 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

R.R. Reynolds, mustered in Feb. 2, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Andrew J.T. Roberts, mustered in Aug. 21, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Michael Ryan, mustered in Sept. 18, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

George Richardson, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James Russell, mustered in Aug. 24, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

Jacob G. Butter, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; discharged by G.O., date unknown.

Richard D. Retzer, mustered in Aug. 29, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 7, 1865.

Henry G. Roates, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; prisoner from June 22, 1864, to April 25, 1865; discharged by G.O. May 29, 1865.

William Rhoads, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Samuel H. Rutter, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to sergt.-maj. Dec. 24, 1863.

Augustus S. Royer, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

S.B. Reifsnyder, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Isaac Spotts, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Presley Smith, mustered in Jan. 30, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John D. Sands, mustered in Feb. 10, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Thomas Seiple, mustered in Aug. 30, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Edward Spangler, mustered in Jan. 17, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1863.

Frederick Sherman, mustered in Sept. 18, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

Jacob Smith, mustered in April 17, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

George Saulentine, mustered in Aug. 17, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Edward Sanbowrn, mustered in Aug. 24, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Elias Swartzlander, mustered in Feb. 29, 1864; absent, in hospital, at muster out.

Henry Smith, mustered in Sept. 13,1863; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864; absent at muster out.

Peter Seasholtz, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 1864, exp. of term.

Morgan Snyder, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, exp. of term.

Augustus G. Straub, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; discharged by special order Nov 25, 1864.

Mahlon V. Smith, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

William Smith, mustered in Aug. 24, 1863; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Samuel Sebold, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Harvey Skeam, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Robert Summers, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Francis Schick, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Andrew Sassaman, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Jacob Shaneley, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Henry Seward, mustered in Sept. 2, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

William J. Thompson, mustered in Sept. 5, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Nathan Trine, mustered in Feb. 10, 1864; prisoner from June 22 to Nov. 20, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 22, 1865.

Levi Trine, mustered in Sept. 17, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Jacob Taney, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Elias Ursner, mustered in Aug. 22, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Andrew Wandler, mustered in March 1, 1864; wounded in action March 31, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 14, 1865.

Frederick Weltz, mustered in Aug. 19, 1864; substitute; absent, sick, at muster out.

George W. Williams, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James Weakley, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; wounded June 16, 1864; absent at muster out.

William Weakley, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; wounded Aug. 14, 1864; absent at muster out.

Charles W. Willard, mustered in Aug. 15, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

Edward Warley, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864; exp. of term.

Levi Walleigh, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864; exp. of term.

John Wahl, mustered in Aug. 24, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

John Ward, mustered in Sept. 6, 1864; substitute.

John S. Weand, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; promoted to quartermaster-sergt. Nov. 1, 1864; veteran.

Abraham Wean, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

David E. Williams, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Henry D. Young, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

William F. Yocum, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.

Lewis Young, mustered in Sept. 18, 1861; not on muster-out roll.


COMPANY B.

Recruited in Chester and Montgomery Counties.

William S. Potts, capt., mustered in Aug. 17, 1861; res. April 26, 1862.

G.C.M. Eicholtz, capt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant to capt. April 26, 1862; res. Sept. 30, 1863.

Joseph M. Opdyke, capt., mustered in Feb. 6, 1862; promoted from 2nd to 1st lieutenant April 26, 1862; to capt. Oct. 1, 1863; discharged Sept. 13, 1864.

Mablon S. Ludwig, capt., mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; promoted from quartermaster- sergt. to 2nd lieutenant March 1, 1863; to 1st lieutenant March 1, 1864; to capt. April

20, 1865; absent, without leave, at muster out.

Ellet L. Brown, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Dec. 22, 1863; promoted from sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Jan. 1, 1865; to 1st lieutenant April 20, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Thomas A. Roberts, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 1, 1861; res. Feb. 1, 1862.

Lewis B. Bland, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 7, 1861; promoted from com.-sergt.

April 26, 1862; res. Dec. 17, 1862.

Calvin B. Selheimer, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Dec. 22, 1863; promoted to Corp. May 1, 1864; to sergt. Dec. 18, 1864; to 2nd lieutenant Feb. 13, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Henry L. Hoopes, 1st sergt., mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; com. 2nd lieutenant Oct 1, 1863; not mustered; must. out Nov. 7, 1864; exp. of term.

Bernard Boner, 1st sergt., mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; promoted to 1st sergt. May 1, 1861; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864 absent at muster out.

John Chrisman, sergt., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; captured at Petersburg June 22, 1864; discharged June 21, 1865, to date May 8, 1865; veteran.

Jacob N. Engbreth, sergt., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; promoted to corp. Feb. 10, 1864; to sergt. April 25, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

William W. Millard, sergt., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; promoted to corp. Nov. 1, 1864; to sergt. April 25, 1865; must. out with company June 27, 1865; veteran.

David Bless, sergt., mustered in Jan. 4, 1864; promoted from private to sergt. April 25, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Richard Moylin, sergt., mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864; exp. of term.

Jacob Bower, sergt., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; captured; died at Richmond, Va., Nov. 30, 1864; veteran.

Charles Langle, corp., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; promoted to corp. May 1, 1863; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864; absent at muster out; veteran.

John Dolby, corp., mustered in Dec. 25, 1863; promoted to corp. March 3, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out; veteran.

Samuel Lacy, corp., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; promoted to corp. Nov. 1, 1864 must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

James T. Kelley, corp., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; promoted to corp. May 1, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Samuel Hall, corp., mustered in Dec. 14, 1863; promoted to corp. May 1, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Henry Hahn, corp., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; promoted to corp. May 1, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Albert Hoffman, corp., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; promoted to corp. May 1, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Samuel W. Kerst, corp., mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864 exp. of term.

Jacob Zerger, corp., mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864; exp. of term.

Curtis M. Supple, Corp., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; captured; died at Millen, Ga., Dec. 8, 1864; veteran.

George W. Mills, corp., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; died June 19, 1864, of wounds received at Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864; buried at Nat. Cem., Arlington, Va.; veteran.

Augustus Wert, corp., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; died June 11, 1865, of wounds received in action March 31, 1865; buried in Nat. Cem., Arlington, Va.; veteran.

Caleb H. Bland, musician, mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

William O. Beard, musician, mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Privates.

Michael Albright, mustered in Jan. 14, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Auchey, mustered in Feb. 12, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

William Betts, mustered in Sept. 1, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

Henry A. Bottroff, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Josiah Beam, mustered in Aug. 20, 1863; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

John Baker, mustered in Oct. 15, 1862; drafted; wounded at Spottsylvania

Court-house May 12, 1864; absent at muster out.

John Borland, mustered in Oct. 31, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Edward Bland, mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Anthony Briggs, mustered in April 15, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Dorance Burdick, mustered in April 15, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Emanuel Bowers, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; drafted; must. out Oct. 12, 1864; exp. of term.

Jacob Boyer, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; captured; died at Andersonville Nov. 4, 1864.

A. Bowerman, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; captured; died at Andersonville Sept. 4, 1864.

John H. Browne, mustered in Nov. 26, 1862.

William E. Beals, mustered in March 31, 1864; not on muster-out roll; veteran.

William Brady, mustered in March 10, 1864.

John Baidenstine, mustered in March 2, 1864.

Franklin Cox, mustered in Feb. 8, 1864; wounded March 31, 1865; absent at muster out.

William A. Chestnut, mustered in Oct. 21, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 25, 1863.

John Clapham, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Samuel Crissy, mustered in Fob. 9, 1864; drafted; must. out Oct. 16, 1864; exp. of term.

George Cless, mustered in Sept. 22, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Harrison Cook, mustered in Sept. 21, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Joseph A. Coons, mustered in Sept. 19, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

John C. Craig, mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1865; exp. of term.

William Carwell, mustered in Oct. 15, 1863; drafted; captured; died at Florence, S.C., Nov. 1, 1864.

Henry Crishard, mustered in March 21, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

George Dailey, mustered in Oct. 3, 1864; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James Decker, mustered in Aug. 28, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Davis, mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864; exp. of term.

Mahlon Doan, mustered in Oct. 30, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

John Dressier, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; killed in action near Petersburg June 16, 1864.

Thomas Dunn, mustered in April 22, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

John Day, mustered in April 26, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

William Eymer, mustered in Aug. 18, 1863; drafted; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864. absent at muster out.

Alfred Eaby, mustered in Oct. 20, 1862; drafted; must. out December, 1864; exp. of term.

George Foster, mustered in Feb. 1, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Peter Fogenroth, mustered in Oct. 15, 1862; drafted; wounded at Petersburg June 18, 1864; discharged Sept. 14, 1861; exp. of term.

William H. Fulton, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; absent, wounded, at muster out.

Michael F. Fryer, mustered in Feb. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

George Fisher, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

John Fogle, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; drafted; died at Alexandria, Va., June 14, 1564; grave 2143.

Samuel Freed, mustered in Oct. 15, 1862; drafted; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., Nov. 8, 1864; grave 11,916.

John Finley, mustered in Feb. 13, 1864.

William Fury, mustered in April 22, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

Michael Fulton, mustered in April 22, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

Aaron Uood, mustered in Oct. 27, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Austin Grove, mustered in Oct 28, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Thomas Gates, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

William Garberick, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

Philip Glesner, mustered in Sept. 1, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Moses Gilbert, mustered in Feb. 22, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

Samuel Guistwite, mustered in Aug, 9, 1862; must. out Nov. 3, 1864, exp. of term.

William M. Henley, mustered in Oct. 10, 1863; drafted; mustered out with company June 30, 1865.

Henry Helman, mustered in Aug. 29, 1863; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

Elhannan Hahn, mustered in Feb. 6, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Henry Henry, mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864; exp. of term.

Andrew Hay, mustered in Nov. 1, 1862; drafted; must. out Jan. 2, 1565, exp. of term.

John B. Holden, mustered in Oct. 21, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Elijah B. Heston, mustered in Oct. 3, 1864; drafted; discim. by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Josiah Howe, mustered in Aug. 18, 1868; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Tobias P. Hecker, mustered in Oct. 22, 1863; drafted; discharged by G.O., date unknown.

William H. Hutton, mustered in Feb. 4, 1864; captured; died at Florence, S.C., Nov. 15, 1864.

George Heasteley, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; died at City Point, Va., June 18, 1864.

Daniel Heller, mustered in Jan. 14, 1864; killed at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864.

Edward Hall, mustered in March 23, 1864.

John Jones, mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out Nov. 7, 1864, exp. of term.

James Johnson, mustered in March 8, 1864.

William Kennedy, mustered in Nov. 1, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Abraham Kibler, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; drafted; must. out Nov. 27, 1864, exp. of term.

George B. Kupp, mustered in Jan. 14, 1864; killed near Petersburg, Va. Oct., 28, 1864.

Daniel Keslinger, mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; killed at Spottsylvania Court House May 12, 1864.

Charles Lackman, mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; must. out with company June 30, 1865; veteran.

Roscoe N. Lee, mustered in April 15, 1865; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Wihliam H. Leonard, mustered in Feb. 26, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Francis Little, mustered in Feb. 24, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 7, 1864.

Daniel Lohr, mustered in Oct. 15, 1862; must. out Nov. 14, 1864, exp. of term.

William F. Loughridge, mustered in Oct. 3, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 12, 1865.

Peter Lohr, mustered in Nov. 1, 1862. drafted; died at Johnstown, Pa., Oct. 5, 1864.

James F. Logue, mustered in Sept. 21, 1864; drafted; died near Petersburg, Va, Jan. 26, 1865.

William Legan, mustered in April 13, 1864.

Daniel Missinger, mustered in Feb. 1, 1864; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

Henry C. Miller, mustered in April 7, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Myers, mustered in Oct. 26, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Francis M. May, mustered in Sept. 1, 1863; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

Morris Mock, mustered in March 22, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Ignatz Miller, mustered in Aug. 19, 1863; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

Joseph Mock, mustered in March 17, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Henry Manus, mustered in Aug. 22, 1863; drafted; discharged by G.O.; date unknown.

Frederick Miller, mustered in March 21, 1864.

Isaac M. Millard, mustered in Feb. 1, 1864; captured; died at Salisbury, N.C., Nov. 21, 1864.

Augustus McCormick, mustered in Feb. 1, 1864; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

James F. McMurray, mustered in Aug. 22, 1863; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

Washington McGowan, mustered in Oct. 15, 1862 drafted; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 2, 1864.

John McCombs, mustered in Feb. 1, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 12, 1865.

Isaac Nimiller, mustered in Oct. 15, 1862; drafted; must. out Nov. 14, 1864, exp. of term.

Isaac N. Nillard, mustered in Feb. 1, 1864; captured; died at Salisbury, N.C., Nov. 31, 1864.

George Paigt, mustered in Oct. 20, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Armstrong Pross, mustered in May 3, 1864; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

William Petterman, mustered in Aug. 28, 1863; drafted; absent, wounded, at muster out.

John Parks, mustered in Aug. 28, 1863; drafted; captured Oct. 27, 1864; absent at muster out.

Amos Parker, mustered in Oct. 1, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

John Peterman, mustered in Aug. 28, 1862; substitute; discharged by G.O., date unknown.

Nathan Reeder, mustered in Oct. 2, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Reiley, mustered in Oct. 22, 1864; substitute; absent, wounded, at muster out.

Joseph Rutan, mustered in Nov. 1, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

William Raymond, mustered in Oct. 1, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. Aug. 7, l865.

John H. Randall, mustered in Oct. 14, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Roof, mustered in Aug. 28, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Samuel J. Hager, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; captured Oct. 27, 1864; absent at muster out.

John P. Reeder, mustered in Feb. 10, 1864; absent, sick, at muster out.

Henry Ridebaugh, mustered in Sept. 21, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Jeremiah Reese, mustered in Sept. 19, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

George Reese, mustered in Sept. 19, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. May, 31, 1865.

Edward Rogers, mustered in March 23, 1864.

William Roache, mustered in March 23, 1864.

George Rupp, mustered in Jan. 5, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

David Stonebaugh, mustered in Aug. 27, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Josiah Sixeas, mustered in Aug. 27, 1863; drafted; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864; absent at muster out.

James Starliper, mustered in Aug. 29, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

James C. Sellers, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

George Sigfried, mustered in Oct. 30, 1861; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Joseph Sheppard, mustered in Oct. 20, 1864; substitute; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Daniel Sewers, mustered in Oct. 3, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. June 24, 1865.

Patrick Scott, mustered in Oct. 21, 1864; substitute; wounded and captured near Petersburg, Va., March 31, 1865; discharged by G.O. July 1, 1865.

Israel Smith, mustered in Oct. 3, 1864; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

Jacob Smeigh, mustered in March 17, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

John H. Sterner, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; drafted; must. out Nov. 14, 1864, exp. of term.

Jacob Shager, mustered in March 17, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. March 29, 1865.

George Sarver, mustered in Nov. 1. 1862; drafted; discharged Jan. 2, 1865, exp. of term.

Joseph Snowden, mustered in Sept. 21, 1864; drafted; discharged on G.O. May 24, 1865.

James Strunk, mustered in Sept. 27, 1864; drafted; discharged on surgeon certif. June 8, 1865.

Solomon Sturtz, mustered in Sept. 21, 1864; drafted; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

William V. Starliper, mustered in Aug. 28, 1863; drafted; discharged by G.O., date unknown.

Andrew Swinehart, mustered in Oct. 15, 1862; drafted; died May 17, 1864, of wounds received in action.

John W. Sonnett, mustered in Oct. 30,1861; captured; died at Salisbury, N.C., Dec. 8, 1864, of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864.

James Swan, mustered in March 25, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

Isaac Turney, mustered in Aug. 31, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Jesse Tyson, mustered in April 6, 1864; drafted; captured; died at Salisbury, N.C., Nov. 4, 1864.

Joseph S. Wickline, mustered in Feb. 6, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

William Wolf, mustered in Aug. 29, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Boyer A. Whipple, mustered in Aug. 20, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Isaac C. Wilcox, mustered in Aug. 20, 1863; drafted; absent, sick, at muster out.

Jacob J. Webb, mustered in Aug. 20, 1863; drafted; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 12, 1864; absent at muster out.

Philip Wiler, mustered in Aug. 20, 1863; drafted; wounded at Spottsylvania Court-House May 10, 1864; absent at muster out.

George Wasson, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Warren, mustered in Oct. 22, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 7, 1865.

William Williams, mustered in Nov. 1, 1864; substitute; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Amos Walters, mustered in April 6, 1864 drafted; captured; died at Salisbury, N.C., Nov. 4, 1864.

Henry H. Yarnell, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Y. Young, mustered in Feb. 25, 1864; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

Henry Yeagle, mustered in Nov. 1, 1862; drafted; died at Washington, D.C., Aug. 16, 1864.

Andrew Zerby, must. Oct. 10, 1863; drafted; must. out with company June 30, 1865.

John Ziegler, mustered in March 16, 1864; captured June 22, 1864; absent at muster out.



Sixty-eighth Regiment.

68th Regiment - The Sixty-eighth Regiment was recruited in the city of Philadelphia and in the adjacent counties of Montgomery and Chester during the summer of 1862, the first company being mustered in on the 4th of August, and the regiment completely organized and in the service by the 1st of September. The camp of rendezvous was established at Frankford, a suburb of Philadelphia. The following were its field officers: Andrew H. Tippin, of Philadelphia, colonel; A.H. Reynolds, of Philadelphia, lieutenant-colonel; Thomas Hawksworth, of Philadelphia, major. Colonel Tippin had seen service in Mexico as lieutenant in the Eleventh United States Infantry, where he was twice breveted for gallant conduct in the battles of Contreras, Cherubusco, and Molino del Rey, and had served as major in the Twentieth Regiment for three months' service. Captain Winslow, subsequently lieutenant-colonel, and others, both officers and men, were in service in Mexico and in the three months' regiments.

The defeat of our arms in Pope's campaign of Northern Virginia, concluding with Chantilly caused the national authorities to summon, peremptorily, troops which had been mustered, and the sixty-eighth was ordered to move at once. Though above the minimum, its ranks were not up to the maximum standard, and the men were only partially uniformed and equipped. But responding promptly to the order, it broke camp on the evening of September 1st and proceeded to Washington. The army was just then falling back to the heights around the capital. The regiment was immediately ordered across the Potomac, and went into camp at Arlington Heights. Here it was armed, and furnished with a complete outfit for an active campaign. It was assigned to Robinson's Brigade of Stoneman's Division.

Soon after the battle of Antietam the regiment moved from camp, and passing through Georgetown, proceeded to Poolsville, arriving on the 10th of October, the day on which the rebel Generals Stuart and Hampton, with a force of cavalry, made their famous raid on Chambersburg, and a complete circuit of the Union army. Intelligence soon spread of the daring ride, and the regiment was marched rapidly to Conrad's Ferry, in expectation that the bold raiders would attempt to cross the Potomac, on their return into Virginia, at this point. But they made for a ford considerably lower down the stream, and passed over without opposition. After remaining several days in the vicinity of the ferry, it rejoined the brigade and proceeded southward with the rest of the army. While on the march the rebel cavalry under White suddenly dashed in upon the train moving with the brigade, and captured wagons belonging to the Sixty-eighth, containing officers' baggage, books, papers and camp and garrison equipage, overpowering and making prisoners of the feeble guard which had it in charge. About forty of the Sixty-eighth were taken, who were sent to Richmond and kept in confinement several months.

In the reorganization of the army, which was made upon the assumption of chief command by General Burnside, the regiment was assigned to the First Brigade(9*) (General Robinson), First Division (General Birney), Third Corps (General Sickles). It was determined to offer battle at Fredericksburg. In the plan of operations it was arranged that Franklin, with the left grand division, supported by a part of Hooker's, should cross below the town and attack upon the left, while Sumner, remaining in front supported by the balance of Hooker's corps, should, at the opportune moment, cross and give battle upon the right. Accordingly, on time morning of the 13th of December, Franklin having forced a passage, attacked with the Pennsylvania Reserves, supported by Gibbon and Doubleday, and finding his attacking column too weak, at the last moment ordered forward Birney's Division. The Sixty-eighth had been encamped near Falmouth, but on the 12th broke camp and moved down to the heights overlooking the field where Franklin's grand division, on the opposite side of the river, had taken position, and remained there until the 13th. It was not until afternoon, and until the battle was in progress on the left, that the order to cross was given. When it finally came, the division moved at double-quick, crossed the bridge, and moved up under a heavy artillery fire, reaching the field just as the Reserves, under Meade, were forced back from the heights, followed closely by the triumphant foe. The Sixty-eighth was ordered to support Randolph's First Rhode Island Battery, which at this critical juncture was being rapidly served and doing fearful execution. The regiment remained in this position, exposed to the enemy's answering fire, and defending the guns from infantry attack, until the heat of the engagement was past. As soon as the cannonading ceased it was ordered into position in the first line with the brigade, close to the enemy's front. For two days it remained in this position, but beyond occasional picket firing was not further engaged. On the night of the 15th the brigade was relieved by the Second Brigade, which had been in the rear, and under cover of darkness recrossed the river. The loss was about forty killed and wounded. Major Hawksworth was mortally wounded and Lieutenant Joseph E. Davis among the killed.

In the movement upon Chancellorsville the Third Corps was at first marched down the Rappahannock to the point where Franklin had crossed in the Fredericksburg campaign, to make a demonstration as if to cross and offer battle at that point, while Hooker, with the main body of his army, crossed and effected a permanent lodgment some miles above. When this had been accomplished, General Sickles, who had succeeded to the command of the Third Corps, marched hastily away to rejoin the army concentrating at Chancellorsville.
"We crossed the Rappahannock,"
says Colonel Tippin in his official report,
"on the 1st of May, having left camp on time 28th of April, passing the intermediate time in the operations below Fredericksburg. On the evening of the 1st we were drawn up in column, with the brigade supporting a battery which had opened upon the enemy, that was soon replied to spiritedly with shells, one of our pioneers being wounded. Here we remained during the night. The next day we were moved into various positions, covering the line of skirmishers, in the operations against the enemy on the left. At evening we retired and remained in position with the brigade. Before the men were fully prepared the next morning the enemy made a vigorous attack on our left and front, and the position of my regiment was changed to the extreme right, so as to more fully cover the battery we were supporting, now firing rapidly. The onset, however, was so rapid and determined, and the front lines having broken and fallen back in some confusion, the regiment was forced to retire with the brigade. After retiring, the brigade was reformed, and with it we quickly moved again to the front in columns doubled on the centre. Deploying at the edge of the woods at the right of our first position, which the enemy now held, we entered and soon engaged him in his rifle-pits, which were charged and taken after a sharp and severe contest. My regiment acted with the brigade in this successful onset, capturing some thirty-five officers and men of the Tenth Virginia Regiment, its colors and color-guard. Being nearly out of ammunition, unsupported, and the enemy strongly pressing us on the right flank, we retired with the brigade, closely pursued by the enemy, back to our last position."
"At daylight on Sunday,"
says General Birney,
"the Third Corps, with my division bringing up the rear, commenced the movement ordered by Major-General Hooker, to take position on the heights in rear of the right of the Twelfth Corps, and to make dispositions to hold the plank-road. In making the movement my rear was subjected to a severe musketry fire, but the troops behaved admirably and withdrew by successive formations. I at once relieved, by Graham's brigade the brigade of the Twelfth Corps next to the plank-road, sent Ward's brigade to support Berry's division on the right of the plank-road and held serve. The artillery of the corps was admirably placed, and I have never seen such terrible execution as it effected upon the hostile masses. The attack upon us was furious and in masses, but the Third Corps held its position until eleven o'clock A.M., when we were ordered to retire and take position in a second line of battle formed like a flattened cone, with flanks resting on the river. The position of my division in the new formation was at the apex. My division, as well as the corps, had suffered most severely, some four thousand eight hundred killed and wounded. Among the killed were Major-Generals Berry and Whipple and among the wounded Brigadier-General Mott."
The loss in the regiment was very severe. Captains James Shields and John D. Paulding were mortally wounded.

At the opening of the battle of Gettysburg, on the 1st of July, the Third Corps was at Emmettsburg. Moving rapidly forward and quickening his steps as the sound of the terrible conflict became more distinct, Sickles reached the field at evening after the fighting of the day was over and the discomfited troops of the First and Eleventh Corps were coming into position to the south of the town. As the column reached the field it went into position along a slight ridge extending "diagonally across the open plain between the Seminary and Cemetery Ridges, connecting with Hancock on its right, with its left refused at the Peach Orchard, and stretching obliquely back through a wood to a rocky ravine in front of Round Top. The position of the brigade, now commanded by General Graham, fell upon that part of the line where, deflecting from the Enmmettsburg pike, it stretches away to Round Top. The angle formed by this departure was at the point where the road leading from Little Round Top crosses the pike; and in this angle, near the house of John Wentz, in one of the most exposed parts of the field, the Sixty-eighth was posted. Open to a fire on front and flank, standing upon the most elevated part of the field, but not sufficiently so to be of any advantage in defense, it was a conspicuous mark for artillery for a long range around, and open to the charge of infantry. The enemy commenced skirmishing with the Sixty-third Pennsylvania, which had been deployed in front, at nine o'clock on the morning of the 2nd, and the fire gradually increased in severity until the battle opened in earnest. Longstreet, who held the rebel right, opened with artillery at four o'clock in the afternoon, and followed up with infantry, putting in brigade after brigade, en echelon, commencing on his extreme right. It was some time before the infantry attack reached the Peach Orchard, where the regiment stood, but the artillery fire bearing upon it was terrific, carrying away men at every discharge. As this was regarded the key to the whole position, it was necessary to hold it at all hazards, and the only alternative was to stand and be shot down without the opportunity to reply. In the midst of the fight General Graham was wounded and borne from the field, and the Command of the brigade devolved upon Colonel Tippin.
"It was,"
says the latter,
"a terrible afternoon, and all were anxious for the Fifth Corps to come up, we were being decimated by their artillery. . . .

In that orchard the lieutenant-colonel and major were wounded and ten other officers killed or wounded, leaving with me but four to bring the regiment but of the fight, having had in all but seventeen present for duty. Just at sunset the rebel infantry charged upon the position with great impetuosity, and the brigade, greatly weakened by its losses and exhausted by frequent maneuvrings, outflanked and vastly outnumbered, was forced to yield, but not in disorder, retiring slowly and contesting the ground inch by inch,"
At this critical juncture portions of the Fifth Corps came to the relief of Sickles, a new line was established and the disaster partially repaired. Near the close of the action General Graham returned upon the field and attempted to resume command; but, weak from loss of blood and unable to endure the trials of that desperately contested field, unfortunately fell into the hands of the enemy. On the third day the regiment was held in reserve on the left centre of the new line, on the lowest part of the entire field, and was not engaged, though exposed to the terrible fire of artillery and losing some men. Colonel Tippin had his horse killed under him oh this day. The loss was about sixty per cent, of the entire number engaged. Captain George W. McLearn and Lieutenants Andrew Black and John Reynolds were among the killed, and Louis W. Ealer mortally wounded.

After the return of the army into Virginia, the regiment participated with it in the fall campaign, and was engaged at Wapping Heights on the 23d of August, and at Auburn on the 14th of October. In the sharp turn taken by Meade on the latter date to get back to Centreville, Colonel Tippin was taken prisoner and was confined in Libby Prison, where he remained for nearly nine months.

In the subsequent advance of the army the regiment, now under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Winslow was engaged at Kelly's Ford on the 7th of November, at Locust Grove on the 27th, suffering severely, Captain Milton S. Davis being among the killed, and at Mine Run on the 28th. In this entire campaign the regiment was given little rest, being almost constantly on the move and suffering considerable loss by sickness and battle.

The regiment went into winter-quarters at Brandy Station, and early in January, 1864, a sufficient number of the regiment re-enlisted to entitle it to continuance as an organization and the veterans to the usual furlough. Not long afterwards the Third Corps was broken up, and the Sixty-eighth, with a considerable portion of it, was consolidated with the Second Corps, General Hancock. With the return of the veterans and the addition of a number of recruits, the regiment assumed proportions something like the original. On the 18th of April, 1864, the regiment, under command of Lieutenant Colonel Winslow, Colonel Tippin being still in confinement, was ordered to the headquarters of General Meade, where it was placed under the immediate command of Brigadier General Patrick, provost marshal general of the army, and employed in guard duty. In this position it remained until the close of the war. The duty was onerous and severe. With other regiments in the same service, it was subject to active duty when emergencies required, and, in several instances, at the critical moment of the battle, when the scale was so evenly poised as to be doubtful which way it would turn, the reserve was sent to the support of the wavering line and made victory secure. When infantry was required for duty with the cavalry, in toilsome and fatiguing raids, the reserve was ordered, or when regiments were taken from the intrenchments, these regiments were obliged to take their places in the works. While in front of Petersburg, half of the Sixty-eighth was on duty at General Meade's headquarters and the balance at City Point. On the 25th of June, Colonel Tippin was exchanged and resumed command of his regiment.

In the last charge made upon the enemy's lines at Petersburg, before the final move, the regiment, though employed in provost duty, was of the storming-party. In the sharp conflict which ensued Major John C. Gallagher was mortally wounded and a number of officers and men were lost.

After the capture of Lieutenant-General Ewell and his forces at Sailor's Creek, this regiment, in conjunction with others then constituting the headquarters' brigade, was detailed to guard the prisoners, and proceed with them to City Point.(10*) The brigade was under the command of Colonel Tippin, and the order was faithfully executed without the loss of a man.

This duty done, the regiment returned to the headquarters of the army, having in charge about six thousand recruits that had accumulated at City Point. It had been but a short time with the moving column when General Meade ordered it to proceed, in company with the One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania, to Hart's Island, near the city of New York to have charge of rebel prisoners confined there. Here it remained until the 9th of June, when it was mustered out of service.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

Andrew H. Tippin, col., mustered in Sept. 1, 1862; prisoner from Oct. 14, 1863, to June 25, 1864; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

Anthony H. Reynolds, lieutenant-col., mustered in Sept. 1, 1862; discharged Oct. 14. 1863, for wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863.

Robert E. Winslow, lieut,-col., mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. C to maj. Jan. 10, 1863; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863; promoted to lieut,-col. Nov. 12, 1863; to brevet col. And brevet brig. -gen. March 13, 1865; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

Thomas Hawksworth, maj., mustered in Sept. 1, 1862; died Jan. 7, of wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862.

John H. Magee, adjt., mustered in Sept. 1, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif, Nov. 26, 1862.

George G. Murgatroyd, adjt., mustered in Aug. 16, 1862; promoted to capt. Co. A Sept. 1, 1863.

Franklin Glenroy, adjt., mustered in Aug. 18, 1862; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. A Sept. 16, 1861; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

Charles A. Jones, quartermaster, mustered in Sept. 1, 1862; res. Nov. 11, 1862.

George R. Clarke, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 25. 1862; promoted from 2nd lieutenant Co. H Oct. 1, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 27, 1863.

Leml. P. Mountain, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. C July 1, 1863; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

Ambrose J. Herr, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 22, 1862; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

John C. Wilson. assist. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; res. Oct. 22, 1864.

Thomas M. Cursen, assist. surgeon, mustered in Sept. 13, 1862 res. Dec. 27, 1862.

John F. McIlvain, assist. surgeon, mustered in March 17, 1863 res. Sept. 4, 1863.

James Shaw, assist. surgeon, mustered in Nov. 18, 1864; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

William Fulton, chaplain, mustered in Sept. 1, 1862; res. Nov. 30, 1862.

Henry Mohn, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 23, 1862 promoted from 1st sergt. Co. D July 8, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 6, 1865.

Lewis W. Ealer, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. F Dec. 19, 1862.

Franklin Glenroy, sergt. -maj., mustered in Aug. 18, 1862; promoted to 1st lieutenant Co. A March 1, 1863.

John Reynolds. sergt. -maj., mustered in Sept. 1, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. E to sergt.-maj. Feb. 17, 1863; com. 2nd lieutenant Co. E Nov. 25, 1863; not must.; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1864.

Paul F. Whitehead, sergt.-maj., mustered in Sept. 2, 1862; promoted to sergt-maj. July 1, 1863; to 1st lieutenant Co. I July 11, 1863.

William H. Whyte, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; promoted to sergt. maj. Aug. 1, 1863; to 1st lieutenant Co. D Dec. 4, 1863.

Jonathan M. Hart, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862: promoted to sergt. maj. Aug. 16, 1863; to 1st lieutenant Co. G July 6, 1865.

John C. Missimer, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Aug. 25. 1862; promoted from corp. Co. H Aug. 1, 1863; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

John S. Sorver, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Aug. 18, 1862; promoted to 1st lieutenant Co. A March 16, 1865.

John H. Malsberger, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. H Sept. 1, 1664; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

Davis H. Missimer, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; transferred to Co. H Aug. 22, 1864.

Samuel T. Schofield, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 18, 1862; transferred to Co. A Oct. 6, 1862.

John H Stiles, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 25, 1863.

James Tait, hosp. steward, mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; must. out with regiment June 9, 1865.

John Green, prin. musician, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to prin. musician March 18, 1864; absent, on detached duty, at muster out.

John F. Miller, prin. musician, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted from musician Co. H Aug. 25, 1863; discharged by G.O. May 22, 1865. 


COMPANY H. 

Recruited in Montgomery County.

William Auchenbach, capt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged June 1, 1863.

Benjamin M. Guest, capt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt.

to 2nd lieutenant Dec. 2, 1862; to 1st lieutenant Aug. 20, 1863; to capt. Dec. 25, 1863; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Hiram C. Feger, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 14, 1863.

David Albright, 1st Iieut., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to 1st sergt. Dec. 2, 1862; to 1st lieut, Dec. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1863.

George R. Clark, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to 1st lieutenant and quartermaster Oct. 1, 1862.

Samuel D. Neiman, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to corp. Sept. 10, 1862; to sergt. Jan. 1, 1863; to 1st sergt. July 1, 1863; com. 2nd lieutenant June 1, 1865; not must.; must. out with company June 9, 1865

David Q. Geiger, sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; wounded at Gettysburg Pa., July 2, 1863; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps; date unknown; discharged by G.O. June 30, 1865.

James M. Engle, sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Richard W. Missimer, sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to sergt. July 1, 1863; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

George Hanes, sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted from corp. to sergt. Dec. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

George L. Reifsnider, sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 25, 1862.

J.H. Malsberger, sergt., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to com, sergt. Sept. 1, 1864.

William H. Large, Corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Charles Childs, corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Harrison F. Ludwig, Corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to corp. Dec. 1, 1862: must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Peter G. Skean, corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to corp. Jan. 1, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

Daniel M. Engle, corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to corp. Aug. 15, 1863; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Jacob G. Focht, corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to Corp. Dec. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

William Brooke, corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged Aug. 13, 1863, for wounds received at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.

John C. Missimer, Corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to quartermaster-sergt. Aug. 1, 1863.

James G. Miller, corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 8, 1865.

Jacob B. Herbst, corp., mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; died Sept, 15, 1863, of wounds received at Gettysburg July 2, 1863; buried at Philadelphia.

Lewis D. Buckley, musician, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

John F. Miller, musician, mustered in Aug 25, 1862; promoted to principal musician Aug. 25, 1868. 

Privates.

Daniel Auchenbach, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Solomon Achuff mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Abner Auman, mustered in Aug. 25,1862; absent, sick in hosp., at muster out.

Henry Auchey, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 2 1863.

John B. Boyer, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Samuel Baker, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Zacharius Bowman, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Peter Bowlig, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Thomas Boyd, mustered in Aug. 25,1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 25, 1862.

William P. Bach, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged May 3, 1864, of wounds received at Gettysburg July 2, 1863.

John Barlew, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Jan. 1, 1864; discharged by G.O. July 3, 1865.

Albert W. Burkett, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; wounded at Gettysburg July 2, 1863; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Jan. 28, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 28, 1865.

Martin Barnhart, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

Amos Brooke, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

Joseph B. Clark, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

William Can, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon Certif. Feb. 18, 1863.

William Cummings, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged Aug. 27, 1862.

Joseph Derolf mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Elijah Derolf, mustered in Jan. 11, 1865; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

J.B. Drumheller, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; wounded at Gettysburg July 2, 1863; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps March 15,1864.

Thomas Derolf mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; died at Philadelphia July 18, 1864.

Henry Endy, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

William Ellis, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Francis A. Fullerton, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged Aug. 30, 1862.

Franklin Fry, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

Henry S. Gehris, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; wounded at Gettysburg July 2, 1863; transferred to Vet. Ret Corps, date unknown; discharged by G.O. June 29, 1865.

Daniel Guldin, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 25, 1862.

John Green, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; promoted to principal musician March 19, 1864.

Gcorge W. Geiger, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; died near Falmouth, Va., Nov. 29, 1862.

Henry F. Guss, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; died near Falmouth, Va., Dec. 10, 1862.

William Gray, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

Henry G. Heist, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

John H. Hoffman, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Henry Hoffman, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Henry Hughes, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

William F. Hetzel, mustered in Sept 9, 1864; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Frederick Heffelfinger, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon Certif. March 2, 1863.

Jacob Hank, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 11, 1862.

John Hendricks, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Oct. 30, 1863.

Ephraim Herbst, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

Washington Heffelfinger, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

Hiram W. Iback, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

William H. Jones, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Hiram C. Jones, mustered in Aug. 29, 1864; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Lawrence Kepner, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Charles Kane, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862: discharged Aug. 30, 1862.

Edward Kocher, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; died at Falmouth, Va., March 20, 1863.

John Lightcap, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

William J. Livengood, mustered in Aug. 29, 1864; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

John M. Landis, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. May 2, 1864.

George H. Lessig, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 26, 1863.

David G. Leffet, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died Dec. 25, 1862; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, Washington, D.C.

William G. Lesher, mustered in Aug. 25, 1865.

Jonah Mock, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Abraham Moyer, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

John Mowatt, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; wounded at Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 27, 1865.

David H. Missimer, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Solomon Miller, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; died July 6, 1863, of wounds received at Gettysburg July 2, 1865.

James McGugert, mustered in March 13, 1865; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Jonathan M. Neiman, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Thomas R. Neiman, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Henry Nagle, mustered in Sept. 7, 1863; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Washington S. Pugh, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Jacob Quinten, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Jan. 18, 1864; discharged by G.O. June, 1865.

Thomas Riley, mustered in March 13, 1865; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Benjamin Reifsnyder, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; killed at Nine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863.

Washington H. Root, mustered in Aug. 25. 1862.

Jacob K. Reifsnyder, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

Charles Simpkins, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Adam Schwenk, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Franklin T. Shaner, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Willoughby Seasholtz, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 18, 1863.

Reuben G. Schealer, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged Jan. 4, 1864, for wounds received at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863.

Henry Seipel, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 5, 1863; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps May 10, 1864.

Abraham Souder, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; killed at Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.

Edward Undercuffer, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

John G. Wise, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Henry Weasner, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Joseph W. Whitman, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 19, 1863.

William S. Wade, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862.

F. Wildermuth, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; missing at Gettysburg July 2, 1863.

John H. Yerger, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 9, 1865.

Franklin Yerger, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged by G.O. May 15, 1865.

John Zeigler, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Oct. 1, 1863.



Ninety-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

93rd Regiment

- The following officers and enlisted men from this regiment were recruited in and accredited to Montgomery County. The regiment ranks among the veteran organizations of the State, and was among the best volunteer regiments in the service. There being no company organization accredited to the county, we omit the field and staff roster and the general history of the command. The regiment was organized at Lebanon, November 3, 1861.(11*)


COMPANY E.

Samuel McCarter, capt.


COMPANY G.

Marshall McCarter, capt.; William A. Ruddach, 1st lieutenant

Privates.

William Oldfield, William Booth, Charles Foreman, George. A. Garrow, Thomas Gash, Joseph Harper, Oliver A. Keisan, John Rester, John McCaully, John Piper, Charles Parker, Augustus Solomon, William Sutch, John Vanse, Dennis Oakes, Charles Thomas, Daniel Meenan, Jacob Weaver.



Ninety-fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

95th Regiment

- This command was organized as the Pennsylvania Zouaves, then as the Forty -fifth and finally as the Ninety-fifth. It was mustered into the service August, 1861, for three years, The regiment served in the Army of the Potomac from its organization to the close of the war, and its losses in the service are reported as the most severe experienced by any Pennsylvania troop in the field. The following officers and members of the organization were recruited from Montgomery County. A general history of this regiment will be found in Bates' "Pennsylvania Volunteers," vol. iii. p. 335.


COMPANY E.

William Foreman, lieutenant; John S. Jeifries, sergt.; Theodore Selah corp.; George Kulp, corp.; Nathan Auner, corp.; John Burnett, corp.

Privates.

Charles Auner, Joseph M. Linker, Mansfield Griffith, Franklin Beaver, John H. Bond, Albanus Brunner, Benjamin Banks, James A. Clayton, James Culp, William Garner, George W. Jeffries, Wilson S. Reeler, William J. Longsdale, Irwin Poley, Lewis Rapine, Isaiah Rhoads, George M. Sommers, Mills C. Williamson, John R. Williamson, William Fulmer, Augustus G. Famous, William Jamison, Benjamin G. Keyser, William B. Nungesser, Frederick R. Nungesser, John Rookstool, James J. Rookstool, Joshua Thompson.



One Hundred and Sixth Regiment.

106th Regiment

- This regiment was organized, with the exception of Company K, between the 14th of August and the 31st of October, 1861, in the city of Philadelphia. Company K was transferred to it from the Sixty-seventh Regiment on the 28th of February, 1862. A large proportion of officers and men had served in the Twenty-second Regiment, and previously in the Philadelphia Light Guard, a militia organization of many years' standing. The following were the field officers: Turner G. Morehead, colonel; William L. Curry, lieutenant-colonel; John H. Stover, of Centre County, major.

Soon after moving to the front it was ordered to duty near Poolesville, Md., where it became part of a brigade (12*) commanded by Colonel E.D. Baker, of the Seventy-first Regiment. While in this position drill and instruction were carefully attended to, and guard and picket duty performed. The battle of Ball's Bluff was fought on the 21st of October, in which Colonel Baker was killed and his regiment terribly decimated. Early in the day the One Hundred and Sixth was marched to the support of the troops engaged, but, for lack of means of transportation, was unable to cross, the men being compelled to stand upon the opposite shore and listen with impatience to the sound of battle where their comrades were rapidly falling, without the ability to render them any assistance.

During the succeeding winter it lay with the brigade near Poolsville, engaged in drill and guard and picket duty. General William W. Burns succeeded. Colonel Baker in command of the brigade, and on the 24th of February the whole force broke camp and moved to Harper's Ferry. Two companies were left in command of Major Stover to garrison the place, while the army moved on towards Winchester. When arrived at Berryville the brigade turned back to Harper's Ferry, where it was joined by the detachment, and moving by rail to Washington, proceeded thence by transport to Fortress Monroe. The regiment participated in the siege of Yorktown, being principally engaged upon picket duty and in the trenches. Upon the evacuation of Yorktown it moved forward, and while the fight at Williamsburg was in progress stood ten hours in line of battle, in a drenching rain, eager to go forward and join in the contest, the sound of which could be distinctly heard, but in vain awaited the order to advance. On Wednesday, May 7th, the troops embarked upon transports and moved up to West Point, whence, after two days' delay, they marched to Brick House Landing. The movement up the Peninsula towards Richmond now commenced. The weather was unusually warm and much difficulty was experienced in obtaining suitable water for the troops to drink. At almost any point water could be obtained by digging from three to five feet; but this was only surface water, and its evil effects soon began to be apparent. Fevers prevailed, and the sick list throughout the army became very large. The regiment suffered severely from this cause.

The battle of Fair Oaks opened on the 31st of May. Sumner's corps was resting at the time on the left bank of the Chickahominy, but as soon as the noise of the battle was borne to the ears of that intrepid leader he put his columns in motion for the bridge, and when the order came for him to move he was already on his way. With great difficulty could the artillery be got across, the river being swollen by recent rains. Kirby's battery, by the most persistent effort, was taken through the swamps, and finally brought into position where it dealt death and destruction upon the hitherto triumphant foe. Gorman's brigade and the Seventy-first and One Hundred and Sixth Pennsylvania were posted for its support, and with great gallantry and steadiness held the ground against the most determined efforts of the enemy to capture the guns. "Prisoners captured during the fight assert that Jeff Davis was in the rear urging his myrmidons forward; and Magruder, who was with him swore a fearful oath, 'That's my old battery, and I'm going to have it,' alluding to Kirby's, which he, Magruder, formerly commanded." (13*)

On Sunday, June 9th, while advancing the picket line, the command was attacked by a superior force of the enemy, and for the moment was compelled to retire. In this encounter Captain Martin Frost, while gallantly leading at the head of his company, was killed. On the following day Lieutenant-Colonel Curry, while visiting the picket post at early dawn, was taken prisoner, the pickets having fallen back during the night without his knowledge. He was taken to Richmond, and thence sent via Petersburg to Salisbury, where, in company with General Michael Corcoran and Colonel John K. Murphy, he experienced harsh treatment, but at the end of three months was exchanged.

"On Saturday, the 28th of June,"
says an officer of the regiment,
"we received orders to strike tents as soon as darkness should hide our encampment from the view of the enemy. Our wing of the army had not participated in the disastrous battles of the preceding days. An order was read announcing victory on the day before. Our troops were buoyant in spirit, thinking we were breaking camp to move forward on the enemy. By eight o'clock the wagons were loaded and sent to the rear. The men, with knapsacks packed and haversacks well filled, were ordered to stack arms and rest in line. An hour passed - two hours - and yet no orders to march. At length at a little after dawn orders came but to move to the rear."
At Peach Orchard dispositions were made to meet the enemy, as though expected to pursue. The One Hundred and Sixth supported Kirby's battery, but the enemy declining to attack directly, made some show of fight, while he moved his principal force past the front with the design of coming in upon the right flank. Divining this purpose, Sumner moved his force at double-quick to Savage Station, and was ready for the onset. The enemy approached on the Williamsburg road and formed his line in the dense forest on either side. Major Stover was ordered to advance with two companies of the One Hundred and Sixth and two of the Seventy-second to the edge of the woods, and uncover the rebel front. Moving at double-quick, Stover soon struck the timber and drew the fire of the skirmishers, driving them back to the main line. In the mean time General Burns, forming his line with the Seventy-second on his right, the One Hundred and Sixth in centre and the First Minnesota on the left, stretching from the forest and railroad to the Williamsburg road, pushed forward upon the heels of the skirmishers, taking position at a fence at the edge of the woods, which he stubbornly held, though exposed to a severe fire of musketry and artillery, and gallantly repulsed most desperate charges of the enemy. The action opened at five o'clock P. M., and lasted for two hours and a ha1f, the enemy charging with desperation, and the right of the One Hundred and Sixth and the left of the Seventy-second at one time engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand struggle. At length the First Brigade, charging over the line of the Second, cleared the woods of the enemy, and the battle ended.
"I found General Burns,"
says an eyewitness of the fight,
"stretched under a lofty pine, and his warriors were slumbering around him painfully. His eyes were hollow and bloodshot, his handsome features pale and thin, his beard and his clothing were clotted with blood his face was bandaged, concealing a ragged and painful wound in his nether jaw. Grasping my hand, he said 'My friend, many of my poor fellows lie in those forests. It is terrible to leave them there. Blakeney is wounded, McGonigle is gone, and many will see us no more. We are hungry and exhausted, and the enemy - the forest is full of people - are thundering at our heels. It is an awful affliction. We will fight them, feeble as we are - but with what hope?'"
(14*) Picket lines were immediately established and the brigade held its position, the rest of the corps moving on across White Oak Swamps, the brigade bringing up the rear.

In the battle of Charles City Cross-Roads, on the following day, the One Hundred and Sixth was ordered to the support of the Sixty-ninth, but just as it was moving General Hooker in person ordered it to the extreme left, where, during the entire engagement, it acted with the Excelsior Brigade, and whatever of credit is due to that brigade on that sanguinary field is equally due to this regiment. The ground was held until the commands of Sumner and Kearny had retired over the Quaker road, and until after daylight, when Hooker followed them. In the battle of Malvern Hill, on the 1st of July, the brigade was principally employed in supporting battMontgomerys and in moving to menaced parts of the field to insure the integrity of the lines.

After the return of the army from the Peninsula General Howard was assigned to the command of the brigade. On its arrival at Alexandria it was marched to the battle-field of Bull Run, but did not arrive in season to participate in the decisive part of the engagement. A reconnaissance was made by this brigade, which was followed by the retreat of the army to Centreville.

In the Maryland campaign General Sumner, who was in command of the corps, arrived on the south bank of the Antietam Creek on the 16th of September, on the opposite side of which the enemy was in a well-chosen position in readiness to give battle. Soon after sunrise on the following morning he crossed the stream and moved up to the support of Hooker, who was now hotly engaged. In the advance the regiment held a position on the right ot the Sixty-ninth, and pushed steadily forward until its course was arrested at the crest, where the enemy was intrenched, and where he was at the moment receiving heavy reinforcements. Soon afterwards the troops upon the left gave way, and the brigade was forced to fall back. Major Stover, who was in command, rallied the regiment at a fence skirting a narrow meadow near the Dunker Church, and by a well-directed fire succeeded in checking the enemy. At this fence, in less than ten minutes' time, one-third of the entire regiment was stricken down, and at the conclusion of the engagement the dead lay in line as they had stood in the fight. Captain Timothy Clark and Lieutenant William Bryan were among the killed.

In the battle of Fredericksburg the division crossed the river soon after the laying of the pontoons, on the 11th of December, and two streets of the city were soon cleared. In the main battle, which was fought on the 13th, the regiment was formed for a charge, with the Sixty-ninth on its right and the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania on its left, and advanced under a terrific fire of artillery to a position within about seventy-five yards of the enemy's works. From midday until nightfall, under a ceaseless fire from two lines of battle, it stood with a coolness and determination rarely paralleled, and though losing heavily, held the ground until darkness closed in upon the combatants and the sound of battle died away.

Retiring after the battle to its former camp, it remained, with unimportant exceptions, until near the close of April. At the opening of the Chancellorsville campaign the brigade was taken to Banks' Ford, where it was employed in driving out the enemy and protecting the engineers while laying a pontoon bridge. It was afterwards engaged in guarding the reserve artillery. On Sunday, the 3rd of May, the regiment crossed the river and advanced to the assistance of Sedgwick, in command of the Sixth Corps, who was struggling against overwhelming odds at Salem Church. Returning to the bridge, entrenchments were thrown up, and the position held until Sedgwick's corps had crossed, when it returned again to camp.

In the battle of Gettysburg, which opened on the 1st of July, the One Hundred and Sixth bore a conspicuous part, arriving with the corps upon the field at a little after midnight of the 1st, and taking position on the extreme left of the brigade, behind the low stone wall on the right centre of the line, in front of and to the left of General Meade's headquarters. The fighting commenced on the afternoon of the 2nd, on the extreme left, where Sickles stood, but soon swept around until it enveloped the whole left wing of the army. Fighting in the open field without defensive works, Sickles' men, though contesting the ground with a valor unsurpassed, were forced hack, and line after line was crushed. While the conflict was thus raging on the left the brigade was lying upon the ground in rear of the crest of the little hill which overlooked the field; but as the wave of battle rolled on towards the right, recognizing the danger to which the left wing was exposed, and seeing that there was a gap in the line to the left, general Webb, in command of the brigade, ordered it to march by the left flank, then by the right, and as it reached the crest beheld the enemy not sixty yards in front, marching on, elated by success, as to assured victory.
"Fire! charge bayonets!"
rang out from the voice of the commander. A crash as from a single piece was the response, and in the twinkling of an eye bayonets were fixed, and, with a cheer that betokened the determination which fired each breast, the line went forward, striking the enemy upon his extreme left flank, and hurling him back in dismay. The One Hundred and Sixth and two companies of the Second New York pursued the retreating foe as far as the Emmettsburg road.
"Our regiment,"
says Lieutenant-Colonel Curry, who was in command, and who was afterwards killed at Spottsylvania, in a letter to a friend, written on the field,
"opened fire and charged so determinedly, along with others, that we drove the enemy to their original lines, and would have spiked a six-gun battery had we not been ordered back. The carnage was terrible, the ground being covered with the dead and wounded. It was in this charge that Adjutant Pleis fell, being struck in the thigh by a piece of shell. I have fully made up for my capture (in June, 1862) as the regiment took a colonel, two majors, a number of captains and lieutenants and at least two hundred privates prisoners. We had more swords than we could use. I have one in place of the one taken from me at Richmond, and also a silvermounted pistol."
The regiment returned to its place in the line, but was scarcely in position when it was ordered to the extreme right, where the Twelfth Corps was engaged. It did not arrive, however, until the fighting at that point had subsided, and soon after it was ordered to Cemetery Hill to the support of the Eleventh Corps, where it went into position at ten P. M., on the right of the Baltimore pike, near Ricketts' battery, where it remained under the terrific cannonade of the following day, and until the close of the battle. It was among the first regiments to enter the town on the following day, and after advancing as skirmishers and reconnoitering, General Ames in command, finding the enemy still in force on the ridge beyond the town, returned again to its position on Cemetery Hill. Lieutenant William H. Smith was among the killed and Adjutant Pleis among the mortally wounded.

In the campaign which followed in the valley of Virginia the regiment shared with the brigade in the long marches and ceaseless vigilance required by the constant and sharp manoeuvring of the enemy for an advantage, and in the action at Robertson's Tavern was actively engaged. After enduring great suffering front cold in attaining the position at Mine Run and in fortifying the purposed line of battle, it withdrew with the army when offensive operations were abandoned, and went into winter-quarters near Stoneboro. During the winter a portion of the regiment re-enlisted. On the 4th of April, 1864, Colonel Morehead resigned, and Major Stover was promoted to colonel of the One Hundred and Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania, whereupon Captain John J. Sperry, of Company A, was commissioned major.

On the 3d of May the regiment broke camp, and after a severe march crossed the Rapidan, and arrived on the 5th on the Wilderness battle-ground. The fighting for three days in the tangled wiles of that ever memorable field was for the most part at close quarters and very severe. From the Wilderness the regiment marched towards Spottsylvania Court-House, but before reaching it encountered the enemy, and the contest was renewed. On the afternoon of the 11th the brigade withdrew from the breast-works in front of the court house, and marched with the corps to the left of the line, where, at down of the 12th, Hancock led his columns upon the enemy's works. Delivered in strong force and at an unexpected hour, the charge was successful, the works being taken with numerous captives and guns. The One Hundred and Sixth in this encounter suffered severely. Lieutenant Colonel Curry, in command, was mortally wounded, and Lieutenants Charles S. Schwartz and Joshua A. Gage were among the killed. The regiment was held upon the front line, where constant skirmishing was kept up until the 18th, when another attempt was was made to rout the enemy, which was unsuccessful. Again moving by the left flank, the corps encountered the enemy at North Anna and again at Cold Harbor. In the engagement at the latter place the brigade was ordered to charge and drive out the enemy from his intrenchments. The attempt was gallantly made, the line advancing boldly up the open ground in front of his fortifications under a terrific fire. The works were too strong to be carried, and dropping upon the ground the men remained in their advanced position until night, when they threw up a breast-work, which they held. In this charge Lieutenant S.R. Townsend was among the killed.

Crossing the James River on the 14th, the regiment participated in the action before Petersburg, and a week later in a movement upon the Jerusalem Plank-Road, in both of which it sustained considerable loss. On the 27th of July the veterans and recruits were organized into a battalion of three companies, which was united for field service to the Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania. The remainder of the regiment was mustered out of service at the expiration of its term, at Philadelphia, on the 10th of September, 1864. The battalion remaining in the field participated in the actions at Ream's Station and Boydton Plank-Road and in the spring campaign which closed the Rebellion. It was mustered out of service on the 30th of June, 1865.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

T.G. Moorehead, col., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; promoted to brevet brig.gen. March 15, 1865; discharged by S.O. April 5, 1864.

William L. Curry, lieutenant-col., mustered in Nov. 16, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., July 7, of wounds received at Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 11, 1864; buried at South Laurel Hill Cemetery, Phila.

John H. Stover, maj., mustered in Dec. 11, 1861; promoted to col. 14th Reg. P.V. April 13, 1864.

Ferdinand M. Pleis, adjt., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; died Aug. 2nd of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863.

John A. Steel, adjt., mustered in Aug. 13, 1861; pro from 1st lieutenant Co. B Aug. 29, 1863: discharged Sept. 10, 1864, exp. of term.

Ralph B. Clark, adjt., mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. K Jan. 24, 1865; com. maj. June 23, 1865; not must.; must. out with batt. June 30, 1865; veteran.

Harry S. Camblos, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; res. June 30, 1862.

W.H. Stokes, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. E June 30, 1862; must. out with regiment Sept. 10, 1864.

Ellis Coder, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; promoted from private Co. F Dec. 1, 1864; must. out with batt. June 30, 1865; veteran.

Justin Dwinelle, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 11, 1861; must. out. with regiment Sept. 10. 1864.

Philip Leidy, assist. surgeon, mustered in Nov. 1, 1861; discharged by G.O. Sept. 6, 1862.

Hugh Alexander, assist. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 6, 1862; discharged by S.O. Oct. 21, 1862.

Erasmus D. Gates, assist. surgeon, mustered in Sept. 13, 1862; discharged by G.O. June 15, 1865.

Henry D. McLean, assist. surgeon, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by S.O. Dec. 5, 1863.

William C. Harris, chap., mustered in Nov. 1, 1861; res. Oct. 31, 1862.

Theodore Wharton, sergt. -maj., mustered in Sept. 28, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. I May 1, 1862.

James C. Briggs, sergt.-maj., mustered in Oct. 31, 1861; promoted to sergt.-maj. May 1, 1862; to 1st lieutenant Co. F Sept. 19, 1862.

William A. Hagy, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. Co. I Sept. 19, 1862; to 2nd lieut Co. G May 1, 1863.

James D. Tyler, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; promoted from priv. Co. D May 1, 1863; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps. Jan. 15, 1864.

William H. Neiler, sergt.-maj., mustered in Sept. 2, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt. Co. C May 1, 1864; discharged Sept. 2, 1864, exp. of term.

Edward J. Lathrop, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 14, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. F Sept. 1, 1864; to 1st lieutenant Co. K Jan. 24, 1865; veteran.

James C. Reynolds, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. H Jan. 21, 1865; com. 1st lieutenant Co. H June 8, 1865; capt. June 23, 1865; not must.; must. out with batt. June 30, 1865; veteran.

Samuel L. Hibbs, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Co. I Oct. 23, 1862.

William M. Casey, quartermaster-sergt,. mustered in Aug. 17, 1861; promoted To quartermaster sergt. Sept. 6, 1862; to 2nd lieutenant Co. A March 1, 1863.

William M. Mehl, q.rn.-sergt., mustered in April 3, 1862; promoted from priv. Co. E March 1, 1863; discharged April 16, 1865; exp. of term.

Charles Rettew, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in March 7, 1864; promoted from priv. Co. K April 16, 1865; com. 1st lieutenant Co. K June 8, 1865; not must; must. out with batt. June 30, 1865.

Jacob Roop, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; must. out with regiment Sept. 10, 1864.

Fred. Weindermnan, com. sergt., mustered in Oct. 31, 1861; promoted from sergt. Co. H Nov. 1, 1864; com. 2nd lieut Co. H June 8, 1865; not must.; must. out with batt, June 30, 1865; veteran.

Giles M. Coons, com. sergt., mustered in Nov. 1, 1861; promoted from corp. Co. K Oct. 1, 1864; discharged Nov. 1, 1864, exp. of term.

Charles H. Weinert, com. sergt., mustered in Sept. 23, 1861; promoted from corp. Co. F Oct. 10, 1864; com. 2nd lieutenant Co. F June 8, 1865; not must; must. out with batt. June 30, 1865; veteran.

Lewis Grantier, principal musician, mustered in Feb. 28, 1862; promoted to principal musician Nov. 1, 1863; discharged Feb. 28, 1865, exp. of term.

Hiram W. Landon, principal musician, mustered in March 11, 1862; died at Bolivar Heights, Va., Sept. 24, 1862.

Charles Sims, principal musician, mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; promoted from priv. Co. H June 13, 1864; must. out with batt. June 30, 1865.

Charles T. Whitcomb, principal musician, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted from priv. Co K March 1, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 13, 1865.


COMPANY G. 

Recruited from Montgomery County. 

J.R. Breitenbach, capt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; com. maj. July 8, 1864 not must; promoted to brevet maj. and lieutenant-col. March 13, 1865; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

George T. Egbert, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; res. Aug. 31, 1862.

Joseph Reed, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; promoted from 2nd lieutenant 1862 discharged March 31, 1863.

William A. Hagy, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 25, 1861; promoted From sergt. maj. May 1, 1863; discharged by special order Dec. 14, 1863.

Amon J. Storms, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

William J. Clark, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. July 25, 1862.

Alden S. Elliott, sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Watson K. Hess, sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; promoted to sergt. June 15, 1863: wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Francis Clark, sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 26, 1862.

William H. Vandoran, sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Aug. 25, 1862.

David Jamison, sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 15, 1863.

Samuel Magargle, sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; promoted from corp. March 1, 1865; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

William H. Muir, sergt., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; promoted from corp. March 1, 1864; killed at Spottsylvania Court-House, Va., May 13, 1864; buried in Wilderness Burial-Grounds.

William H. Lott, corp., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; wounded at Gettysburg Pa., July 3, 1863; transferred to Co. K, date unknown.

Jesse McCombs, corp., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif, Aug. 30, 1862.

William H. Abrams, corp., mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; captured at Petersburg, Va., June 22, 1864; transferred to Co. K, date unknown.

Privates.

Charles Archer, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Sept. 10, 1862.

William Allen, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., Oct. 25, 1862; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery.

Jacob Baker, mustered in July 17, 1864; drafted; transferred from 165th Regt, P.V.; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Josephus Baker, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 20, 1863.

John Bisbing, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. March 21, 1863.

Samuel Brown, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb., 1863.

James H. Bennett, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 28, 1862.

Isaac Brown, mustered in April 5, 1862; transferred to Co. K, date unknown; veteran.

John Bobb, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; killed at Fair Oaks, Va., June 28, 1862.

Thomas Bitler, mustered in April 8, 1862; died of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

William Bundick, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

William Caruthers, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; died at Harper's Ferry, Va., Nov. 18, 1863.

James Campbell, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Joseph Dickinson, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Bernard Dugan, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

David Dungan, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 29, 1862.

Solomon Dirk, mustered in April 8, 1862; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Sept. 16, 1863.

Benjamin Ehler, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; wounded at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862; absent, in hospital, at thuster out.

Alfred M. Fields, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Michael Flanagan, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 28, 1863.

Thomas Fagan, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; killed at Camp Observation, Md., Feb. 26, 1862.

John Flick, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., Jan. 5, 1863.

John C. Facher, mustered in April 8, 1862.

Michael Gallagher, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 17, 1863.

John F. Hale, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; absent, in hospital, at muster out.

Charles Heite, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

John Johnson, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

George Kilpatrick, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

George Krupp, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; died at Norristown, Pa., April 13, 1862.

John O. Kearney, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863.

Harry Kinnear, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Christian Leoser, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Walter Leggett, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; killed at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.

George Murray, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

John F. Meeser, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

John Murry, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. July 25, 1862.

George W. Miller, mustered in Jan. 17, 1864; drafted; transferred from 165th Regiment P.V.; transferred to Co. K, date unknown.

Bernard Muldoon, mustered in June 15, 1864; transferred to Co. K, date unknown.

And. J. Manning, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Joseph McDonnell, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 31, 1863.

Theo. McLaughlin, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Neil McDade, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Camillus Nathans, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

John O'Neil, Sr., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps. must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

John O'Neil, Jr., mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 21 1863.

John Pope, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Edward Phillips, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 24, 1863.

Edward Powers, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 15, 1863.

Samuel Patterson, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Neh'm Reynolds, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 25, 1863.

Daniel Ridge, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Nov. 14, 1863.

Wilson Bitter, mustered in April 8, 1862; killed at Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 12, 1864.

George W. Bobbins, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; captured in action at Petersburg, Va., June 22, 1864; died at Andersonville, Ga., Aug. 21, 1864; grave 6321.

William Steward, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Clayton Super, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 11, 1863.

William J. Storms, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Sept. 26, 1863.

Joseph S. Sellers, mustered in April 18, 1862; transferred to Co. K, date unknown.

Henry Smith, mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; died at New York Dec. 1, 1862; burial record Nov. 14, 1862.

Josiah Schwenk, mustered in Aug. 28, 1861; died at Yorktown, Va., May, 1862; burial record June 11, 1862; buried in National Cemetery, Section D, grave 206.

Abraham Stoltz, mustered in April 8, 1862; died at Washington, D.C., Jan. 26, 1863.

Anthony Starr, mustered in April 8, 1862; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863; buried in National Cemetery, Section D, grave 16.

John Spicer, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

William M. Stroud, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Robert Simpson, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Lewis I. Sickels, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Alexander Tippin, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 26, 1862.

Ottis Travis, mustered in Dec. 25, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 4, 1863.

William S. Townsend, mustered in April 8, 1862; died at Philadelphia, Pa., May 30, of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May, 1864.

Terrence Tobin, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; killed at Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 11, 1864.

George Trump, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861.

Charles Winstanley, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; must. out with company Sept. 10, 1864.

Morgan Williams, mustered in Aug. 27, 1861; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 14, 1863.



One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

129th Regiment

- Five companies of this regiment - A, B, E, G and H - were recruited in Schuylkill County, four - C, D, F and K - in Northampton, and one company, I, was recruited in Montgomery. They rendezvoused at Camp Curtin, where, on the 15th of August, 1862, a regimental organization was effected, with the following field officers: Jacob G. Frick, of Schuylkill County, colonel; William H. Armstrong, of Northampton County, lieutenant-colonel; Joseph Anthony, of Schuylkill County, major. Colonel Frick had served with credit as lieutenant in the Mexican war and as lieutenant-colonel of the Ninety-sixth Pennsylvania Regiment until the 29th of July, 1862. On the day following its organization, after having been hastily armed and equipped, it was hurried away to Washington, and on the 18th went into camp in the neighborhood of Alexandria. Company and regimental drills were early commenced, and by the active and intelligent efforts of its colonel the regiment rapidly attained a marked degree of efficiency. While the command was stationed here two companies were detailed to rebuild a bridge across Bull Run, where they remained as guard. On the 30th the remaining companies, after having been held for four days in constant readiness to march, proceeded as guard to an ammunition train to Centreville, passing on the way the corps of Fitz John Porter, in light marching order, bound for the front. The cannonading had been heavy throughout the day. Towards evening it rapidly came nearer, and at five P. M., after having safely delivered the train, the command was, for the first time, under fire, the rebel artillery throwing shells into the woods near Centreville, where it was resting. Proceeding on its return to Fairfax Seminary, it was brigaded on the 3d of September with the Ninety-first, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth, and One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Regiments, commanded by General E.B. Tyler. Brigade, battalion and company drills were studiously practiced, and on the 7th its camp was changed to a point near Fort Richardson.

On the morning of the 14th the brigade started on the march through Maryland, arrived at the Monocacy on the 16th, where it was halted, and on the 17th resumed the march to the sound of heavy canonading, arriving early on the following morning on the field of Antietam. But the enemy had by this time retired, and the command soon after went into camp, where for six weeks, with the exception of an expedition up the Shenandoah Valley with the division, the regiment remained engaged in drill and unimportant picket duty. On the 30th of October the army commenced crossing into Virginia, and moving down the valley, continuing the movement, with a slight interruption at Warrenton, until it arrived opposite Fredericksburg, and Burnside's bloody but fruitless campaign was inaugurated.

Shortly after noon of the 13th of December the division crossed time Rappahannock, and proceeding through the town to a position in full view of the field, awaited the order to enter the fight. It was not long delayed, and again advancing by a main road, the brigade halted in low, open ground, where the men were ordered to lie down. Tempted by the easy range and unprotected situation of the brigade, the enemy opened a destructive fire from his battMontgomerys, by which Lieutenant Jacob Parvin, Jr., was mortally, and a number of privates severely wounded. Moving to the left of the road, the division was shortly after formed in line of battle on the crest of the hill, the brigade in two lines, the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth on the left front. In the hopeless and fruitless charge which followed, made under a ceaseless fire of musketry and artillery from the impregnable position which the enemy held, officers and men did everything that true soldiers could do, traversing in good order the lines of dead and wounded left in previous charges, and pressing forward in the gathering darkness until they attained position in advance of every previous charge, and from which it was impossible to go farther. In the brief space that it was in motion the regiment lost one hundred and forty-two in killed and wounded. The caps of some were subsequently found close up to the famous stone-wall, and an officer and seven privates of Company D were taken prisoners. Captain George J. Lawrence and Jonathan K. Taylor were mortally wounded. Captain Taylor was shot through the lungs early in the charge, but refused to leave the field, and retired with his command. Captains William Wren, Jr., Herbert Thomas, E. Godfrey Rehrer and Levi C. Leib and Lieutenant A.A. Lukenbach were wounded. Lieutenant Joseph Oliver was wounded and fell into the enemy's hands. The loss in killed was sixteen. General Tyler, in his official report of the battle, says:
"Colonel O'Brien, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth, led the right front; Colonel Frick, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth, the left; Colonel Elder, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth, held the right rear and Colonel Gregory, Ninety-first, the left rear. These officers discharged their respective duties creditably and satisfactorily, their voices being frequently heard above the din of battle urging on their men against the terrible shower of shot and shell and the terrific musketry as we approached the stone wall. Of their conduct I cannot speak too highly. Lieutenant-Colonel Rowe,

Lieutenant-Colonel Armstrong, Major Anthony and Major Thompson are entitled to great credit for their efforts and officer-like conduct during the engagement. Lieutenant-Colonel Armstrong had a horse shot under him. Adjutant Green exhibited great coolness in the discharge of his duty. It may not be improper for me to say that Captain Thomas, acting inspector-general on the staff of the division commander, haying his horse shot, and thus prevented from serving him, joined his company in the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth, and was severely wounded while leading his men in the charge."


After dark the regiment was again marched upon the field for guard duty, but was withdrawn towards midnight. On the 14th and 15th it remained in the town, losing one man by the shot of a sharpshooter, and on the morning of the 16th, after having spent the night in throwing up a breast-work on the right of the town, recrossed the river and retired again to camp. The knapsacks which had been thrown aside before going into battle had been carefully guarded, but were not recovered. During the cold, rainy days preceding the 23d of December, when extra clothing and blankets were furnished to supply the place of those lost, the men suffered greatly from exposure, one dying and many being thrown into hospitals. Drill and picket duty, which was at times severe, the Mud March from the 20th to the 24th of January, 1863, and occasional reviews filled up the measure of its duty until the opening of Hooker's first campaign.(1*****)

The regiment marched with the corps on the Chancellorsville campaign, though the time of many of the men had already expired, and took part in the fighting of the 1st, 2nd and 3d of May. In the principal contest, on the morning of the 3d, it was closely engaged in its place in the division line of battle in the wood in front of the Union battMontgomerys. After nearly two hours of sharp musketry firing the ammunition became exhausted, and the right flank of the division was turned. The command was given to face by the rear rank and retire, in order that the battMontgomerys might have full play upon the rebel columns coming in upon the flank. It was executed in as orderly a manner as the thickly-wooded ground would permit, but the One Hundred and Twenty-ninth, bringing up the rear, had not left the wood before the enemy closed upon it, and some spirited hand-to-hand encounters occurred. The colors were twice scized, but were defended with great gallantry and brought safely off. Lieutenant-Colonel Armstrong fell into the enemy's hands, but made his escape in the confusion caused in his ranks by the fire of the Union battMontgomerys. Major Anthony was shot through the lungs, but was assisted off the field, and still survives what was then considered a mortal wound.
"The One Hundred and Twenty-ninth,"
says General Tyler, in his official report,
"was on our left, and no man ever saw cooler work on field drill than was done by this regiment. Their firing was grand, by rank, by company and by wing, in perfect order."
The loss was five killed, thirty-two wounded and five missing. On the 6th the regiment recrossed the Rappahannock and returned to its camp near Falmouth. On the 12th, its term of service having fully expired, it returned to Harrisburg, where, on the 18th of May, it was mustered out. The return of companies to Easton and Pottsville was marked by flattering and enthusiastic demonstrations on the part of the citizens.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

Jacob G. Frick, col., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

W.H. Armstrong, lieutenant-col., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 15, 1863.

Joseph Anthony, maj., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; absent, in hospital, at muster out.

David B. Green, adjt., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

William F. Patterson, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

Joseph Rossiter, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 12, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

Otto Suliittler, asst. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

John G. Long, asst. surgeon, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; discharged Nov. 26, 1862.

William H. Rice, chaplain, mustered in Aug. 16, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

Strange J. Palmer, sergt. maj., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; promoted from private Co. G March 28, 1863; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

John S. Engle, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; promoted from private Co. G Aug. 15, 1862; to 2nd lieut Co. H Dec. 1, 1862.

Franklin C. Stout, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 12, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. C Jan. 1, 1863; to 2nd lieutenant Co. C March 28, 1863.

Henry C. Taylor, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; promoted from private Co. A Aug. 15, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

Henry Broughner, com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. G Aug. 15, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.

John T. Bond, hosp. steward., mustered in Aug. 14, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. E Aug. 21, 1862; must. out with Regiment May 18, 1863.


COMPANY I.

Frederick B. Shunk, capt., mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 6, 1862.

Benjamin F. Bean, Capt., mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; promoted from 2nd lieutenant Dec. 6, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

George Z. Vanderslice, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 10, 1862.

Henry H. Fetterolf, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. Dec. 5, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John B. Roberts, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted from sergt. Dec. 10, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Aaron Welkel, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted from sergt. Dec. 6, 1862; must. out with company May 18, l863.

Jacob Rapp, sergt., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Henry Longstreth, sergt., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Joseph Culp, sergt., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted from corp. Jan. 1, 1863; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William Heebner, sergt., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted, from Corp. Jan. 1, 1863; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Richard Moore, Corp., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted to Corp. Jan. 9, 1863; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Bethel M. Yerkes, Corp., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Edward F. Houser, corp., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William K. Faust, Corp., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. Out with company May 18, 1863.

William Harley, corp., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Eber H. Beaumont, corp., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted to corp. Jan. 9, 1863; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John H. Hartzell, Corp., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted to corp. Jan. 9, 1863; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Michael S. Kelly, corp., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; died at Falmouth, Va., Feb. 19, 1863.

Enos Poley, musician, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Privates.

William Alderfer, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Dillman Bean, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Cadwallader H. Brooke, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William T. Clemmens, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

George W. Colehower, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Edward B. Conrad, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John T. Cox, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Jacob Curry, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; absent, in hospital, at muster out.

Joseph H. Cole, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 14, 1863.

Nathan Davis, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John Dechert, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Benjamin F. Detra, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William Dorworth, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must out with company May 18, 1863.

William Doubman, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William Dunmore, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Andrew Dunn, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

James K. Espenship, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Henry D. Espenship, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

David V. Eisenberry, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Jonathan C. Evans, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

James W. Essig, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; died near Falmouth, Va., Dec. 29, 1862.

Henry H. Fretz, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Samuel C. Foust, mustered in Aug.11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William Finger, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Daniel W. Fisher, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Sylvester G. Fretz, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Benjamin Fudge, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; died near Falmouth, Va., April 18, 1862.

Albert L. Gehman, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Levi Gotchall, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

James Grasy, Jr., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William H. Gristock, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Christian Groff mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Jesse K. Gordon, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; died at Snicker's Gap, Va., Nov. 6, 1862.

George Harpst, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Ephraim Harner, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Joseph A. Henry, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Andrew Hiser, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William Hoffner, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John B. Horn, mustered in Aug. 11; 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Morris Hunsicker, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John Q. Hunsicker, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Jesse Jarrett, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John Jarrett, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Henry Kooker, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Joseph D. Keyser, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; died at Washington, D.C., Jan. 8, 1863.

Abraham Landis, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Emanuel Longaker, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Joseph L. Mandill, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; absent, in hospital, at muster out.

Isaac T. Miller, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Abraham R. Moyer, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Aseph S. Morris, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Edwin L. Nieman, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Canning F. Peixoto, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John A. Prizer, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John Place, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John Quay, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John S. Rahn, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Rezekiah B. Rahn, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Andrew S. Rahn, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John S. Rapp, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Thomas J. Rapp, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Aaron II. Richards, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18. 1863.

William Sheaf, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John Smith, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Thomas M. Snyder, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John Stern, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Benjamin Swartly, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Robert H. Tyson, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Charles C. Watts, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Joseph D. Watson, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Isaac T. Weer, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Jacob B. Weikel, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

William W. Wisler, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

John W. Worrell, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.

Edward B. Watts, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 30, 1862.

Abraham Zollors, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; must. out with company May 18, 1863.



One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

138th Regiment

- Recruiting was commenced for the companies which ultimately composed this regiment under the call for nine months' service, but before it was completed an order was issued forbidding the acceptance of more men for a less period than three years, and the terms of enlistment were accordingly changed to three years. Companies A, C, I and K were recruited in Montgomery County; B and G in Adams; D, E and F in Bedford, and Company H in Bucks. The companies rendezvoused at Camp Curtin, the first company arriving on the 16th of August, 1862, and by the 26th their organizations were completed, and they were mustered into the United States service. Charles L.K. Sumwalt, of Adams County, was appointed colonel, and under his command, on the 30th, it moved to Baltimore.

It reported to General Wool, in command of the Middle Department, and was by him ordered to duty at the Relay House, the Washington Junction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Shortly after his arrival Captain M.R. McClennan, of Company A, was appointed lieutenant-colonel, and Captain Lewis A. May, of Company F, major. It was employed in guarding the railroad, to prevent mischief by secession sympathizers, and to prevent any interruption of communication with the capital. For this purpose Company A was stationed at Jessop's Cut, C at Dorsey's Switch, E at Hanover Switch, D at Elk Ridge Landing, G at Fort Dix, a small earth-work, mounting six guns, commanding the Washington Viaduct, a handsome stone structure spanning the Patapsco River B at Ellieott's Mills, a detachment of I at Elysville, and the remaining four companies - F, H, I and K - at headquarters, pear the Relay house. This was the original disposition, and the relative strength remained the same, though the companies were periodically changed to give all an opportunity for regimental drill. During the time of the Maryland campaign, which culminated in the battle of Antietam, this road was the scene of great activity, and the force at this point was strengthened by the addition of the One Hundred and Eighteenth New York and Battery B of the Fifth New York Light Artillery. After the campaign was ended the regiment was again left to perform the duty alone. Many deserters and stragglers from the Union army, and aiders and abettors of the enemy, were arrested and committed. The winter and spring of 1862 -63 passed with little to change the regular routine of duty. On the 2nd of May, Lieutenant-Colonel McClennan was promoted to colonel, in place of Colonel Sumwalt, whose connection with the service was severed on 30th of March preceding.

On the 16th of June the regiment was ordered to active duty and proceeded to Harper's Ferry, where it was assigned to Elliott's brigade, a part of the command with which Milroy had in vain battled with the advancing columns of Lee's army, at Winchester, on their way to Pennsylvania. General French was in command at Harper's Ferry, with the brigades of Kenly, Morris and Elliott under him. The heights were strongly fortified, the trees in front were swept away, artillery was advantageously posted, strong picket lines were established and every precaution taken to give the foe a warm reception. But he wisely shunned this route, his bivouac fires and his long trains being visible in the distant valley as they passed and crossed the Potomac at Williamsport. Harper's Ferry was evacuated on the 1st of July. All munitions and stores that could not be removed were destroyed and the remainder was loaded on canal-boats, and sent to Washington. Elliott's brigade was charged with guarding it and taking it through, the rest of French's division moving to Frederick. From Washington the brigade proceeded by rail, on the 7th, to Frederick, and rejoined the division, and on the following day joined the army in its pursuit of Lee, now fresh from the field of Gettysburg. General French assumed command of the Third Corps, in place of Sickles, who had fallen in the desperate fighting of the 2nd, and General Elliott succeeded the former in command of the division, now attached to that corps. On the 16th the corps crossed the river at Harper's Ferry, and on the 23d encountered the enemy in a strong position at Wapping Heights, his infantry, screened by stone walls, making a determined resistance. He was finally dislodged by a gallant charge of the Excelsior Brigade, and was driven into the valley beyond. Elliott's brigade did not become engaged, though held under fire a considerable portion of the time during the engagement. At Warrenton the corps halted and remained until the 1st of August, when it moved out to the Rappahannock, the regiment being posted at Fox's Ford, charged with out-post duty. On the l5th of September the corps moved on to Warrenton, where it remained in comparative quiet, with the rest of the army, for nearly six weeks. In the mean time two corps, the Eleventh and Twelfth, had been detached from the Army of the Potomac and sent to the support of Rosecrans, cooped up in a precarious position at Chattanooga. Feeling that he could now with safety assume the offensive, Lee commenced a sudden flank movement by the right, and Meade, to save himself, retreated to Centreville. In this movement the regiment was divided, a portion being assigned as guard to the ammunition train and the remainder to the corps ambulances. At Centreville the movement of the two armies was reversed without coming into conflict, and Lee retreated and Meade pursued. On the 23d of October the regiment was relieved from guard duty with the trains and rejoined its brigade. After crossing time Rappahanock, and when within two and a half miles of Brandy Station, the enemy's rear guard was encountered. Elliott's division had that day the advance, and the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Pennsylvania and the One Hundred and Tenth Ohio were immediately deployed, the former to the left and the latter to the right of the railroad, and with Berdan's sharpshooters and Company A of the One hundred and Thirty-eighth thrown forward as skirmishers, advanced with supporting regiments to the attack. The fire of the enemy's artillery was severe. Early in the engagement a shell struck and exploded in the ranks hear the centre of the regiment, mortally wounding Captain Lazarus C. Andress and carrying away the left arm of Sergeant Abraham G. Rapp. The missile burst as it struck the former, fearfully mangling his hip and thigh and shivering his sword. The hill was carried and the enemy barely escaped with his artillery. The loss was seven wounded.

At Brandy Station the army halted, and remained until the 23rd of November, when it set forward on the Mine Run campaign. The Third Corps crossed the Rapidan at Jacob's Ford, and on the 27th came up with the enemy at Locust Grove. The Second Division was first engaged, and being hard pressed, the Third, now commanded by General Carr, was sent to its support and formed on its left, the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth being on the extreme left of the line. The fighting soon opened on its front, at close range, and buck and ball were hurled with telling effect against the advancing enemy. Colonel McClennan, while moving along the line encouraging his men and directing the fight, was stricken down and carried from the field. Captain Fisher had an arm shattered and Adjutant Cross was disabled. At dark, after having gallantly held the ground, and repulsed repeated charges, inflicting great slaughter, it was relieved by fresh troops, and rested for the night on the field. The loss in the engagement was seven killed, forty-five wounded and three missing. During the night the enemy withdrew to his fortified position behind Mine Run. After advancing to and reconnoitring his ground, it was decided to abandon the campaign, and the army returned to camp near Brandy Station, where the regiment was soon settled in comfortable winter-quarters.

Colonel McClennan, having measurably recovered from his wounds, returned to duty on the 13th of March, 1864, and was received in camp with demonstrations of warm regard. The smooth-bore muskets with which the regiment was armed were soon afterwards exchanged for Springfield rifled muskets. In the reorganization of the corps, preparatory to the opening of the spring campaign, the Third Division of the Third Corps became the Third Division of the Sixth, General Ricketts in command. The army moved on the 3rd of May, and on the 5th, soon after crossing the Rapidan, it was attacked in the tangled thickets of the Wilderness. It was near midday before Rickett's division was put in motion. Towards evening, after having marched and counter-marched, the brigade, to the command of which General Truman Seymour had that morning been assigned, was detached and hurriedly led to a position on the extreme right of the corps, passing on its way the scene of a most sanguinary struggle, where the dead of both armies were thickly strewn on the wild wooded battle-field. At dark it was formed in two lines, the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth on the second line. It was thought that only a picket guard of the enemy's extreme left was in front, and in swinging around to envelop it the command was suddenly brought under a severe front and flank fire from strong columns. For two hours, with the most stubborn fighting, the ground was held, when on both sides the fighting gradually died away, and the lines rested on the field where they had fought. The casualties in the regiment were slight, Sergeant Biesecker, and John H. Ashenfelter, of the color guard, being killed. All night long the moans and the cries of the dying filled the air, and the ominous sound of the enemy chopping and fortifying in front and far out on the right flank was distinctly heard. General Seymour was apprised of these threatening indications, but the order of the previous evening to renew the assault in the morning was not modified, and at nine o'clock the brigade moved to the desperate work, and now the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth on the front line. The men were charged not to fire a shot until they had reached the enemy's works. Apprised by the clanking of arms of their approach, he was ready to receive them. The pattering fire of his skirmishers deepened into showers as they went, and finally a perfect storm of deadly missiles greeted them; but without wavering, the lines moved on until within fifty yards of his breast-works, where the flashes of his guns were plainly visible through the tangled wood. And now, when the moment for a final dash had come, impatient soldiers began to stop and to fire. Felled trees and tangled branches made it more and more difficult to advance. The momentum of the charge was lost, and the men, taking shelter behind trees, and lying prostrate upon the ground for an hour in the face of a most destructive fire of infantry and artillery hurling grape and canister, held their ground. Seeing that there was no hope of success, the brigade was finally ordered back to the position of the morning, unavoidably leaving many of the dead and wounded on the field. Late in the evening, while the men were preparing their coffee behind their hastily constructed breast-works, Shaler's brigade, which had been posted upon the right of Seymour, was suddenly attacked in flank and rear by a powerful body of the enemy under Gordon. Sweeping down upon the unsuspecting troops, as did Jackson upon the Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville, Gordon scattered and drove all opposed to him. He was finally checked by reinforcements from other parts of the line, and the lost ground regained. General Shaler and Seymour, with numbers of their troops, were taken prisoners. Weakened by two fatal and unsuccessful charges, the brigade was in no condition or heart to resist, and the general who had refused to listen to the representations of danger in the early morning added another to the misfortunes which had attended his career at Charles City Cross-Roads, Fort Wagner and Olustee. The regiment lost in these engagements twenty-seven killed, ninety-four wounded and thirty-five missing, of whom twenty-six were known to be prisoners. Lieutenant John H. Fisher was killed, and Lieutenants H.C. Grossman and John E. Essick were wounded, the latter mortally.

On the 7th the contending parties acted on the defensive, operations being confined to skirmishing. On the night of the 8th the first of Grant's movements by the left flank began. In the fierce fighting which occurred about Spottsylvania, and in the subsequent movements during the month of May, the regiment shared, and, was frequently under fire, losing five wounded on the 12th, three wounded on the 13th, one killed on the 18th, one wounded on the 19th, two wounded on the 20th, and one wounded on the 31st, but did not become involved in the more desperate fighting.

On the 1st of June the troops from Butler's army of the James were met in the vicinity of Cold Harbor, and orders were given to prepare for an engagement,
"A hasty disposition of these commands was made,"
says Lieutenant Lewis, in his narrative of this regiment,
"skirmishers were advanced, the enemy's

position partially developed, a plan of assault selected, and at five o'clock the attack was commenced. The Third Division, on the right of the corps, adjoining General Smith's left, moved forward in four lines of battle, and with great promptness.

"The front line of the Second Brigade consisted of the Sixth Maryland and the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Pennsylvania, and these two regiments were the first to encounter a galling fire from the enemy's sharp-shooters and a difficult swamp which had to be crossed. These obstacles overcome, the rebel main line, situated on a ridge thickly wooded with pine, was found defended by strong numbers. The Sixth and time One Hundred and Thirty-eighth were the first troops to clamber over the works and break the rebel front, which was only accomplished by a solid rush and hard fighting. The confusion and flight of the enemy resulting from this breach in his line was quickly followed up, and in a short time the two above specified regiments had captured more prisoners than their own numbers. On other portions of the line our troops had not carried the works, and we, in our zeal to drive the enemy, soon distanced all supporting columns to the jeopardy of our own safety. At one period the men of our regiment drove the gunners from a battery; but when within a few yards of its position, and about to seize it, our scattered and weakened numnbers became apparent to the enemy, who rallied heavily against us, returned to his guns, and checked our further advance by a raking charge of canister. We were hard-pressed, but the captured ground was maintained. The entire Third Division joined in the work with alacrity at the first onset, and to this command belongs the credit of being the only division of two corps to successfully accomplish the task assigned it in this battle."
The conduct of the division drew from General Meade a congratulatory order, in these words:
"Please give my thanks to Brigadier-General Ricketts and his gallant command for the very handsome manner in which they conducted themselves to-day. The success attained by them is of great importance, and if promptly followed up, will materially advance our operations."
During the night the lines were reformed and the rebel works were reversed. On the 3d another assault was made, but without success, and the two armies fell to digging, which was continued until the 12th, when the Union army was quietly withdrawn and moved off towards the James. The loss was seven killed, fifty-four wounded and seven missing. Lieutenant Charles P. McLaughlin was among the killed.

After crossing the James, about the middle of the month, the Third Division moved up to Point of Rocks, and was assigned a position in the trenches at Bermuda Hundred, but subsequently rejoined the corps in front of Petersburg, and near the close of the month joined in the movement upon the Weldon Railroad, at Ream's Station, in which several miles of the road were destroyed.

On the 6th of July, Ricketts' division was ordered to City Point, and thence moved by transport to Baltimore, Cars were in waiting, upon which it immediately proceeded to Monocacy, and there awaited the advance of the enemy under Early, who, with a powerful division of Lee's army, was advancing on Washington. Line of battle was hastily formed, the troops of General Wallace, who commanded the department, occupying the right, which rested on a high fortified bluff overlooking the railroad and Monocacy Creek, and Ricketts' division, drawn up in two lines, the left, the whole in crescent shape, stretching across the railroad and the Washington turnpike. By ten on the morning of the 9th the skirmishing was brisk, and it soon became evident that the Union force was vastly outnumbered. To equal his front, Ricketts' division was stretched out in a single thin line, and against this the enemy came on in heavy force, rejoicing in his strength and confident of victory. The One Hundred and Thirty-eighth occupied a position on the unprotected left flank. To prevent this from being turned, which seemed to be the object of the enemy, the line was refused until it became impossible for him to execute his purpose without dividing his force. Foiled in this, he made a direct assault in three lines. As soon as he came within range a well-directed fire was opened, and rapid rounds were Poured in with admirable effect. His first and second lines were broken, and the third advanced in their places; but still the division held its ground. At five P. M. the troops on the right gave way, and Ricketts was compelled to order a retreat to save himself from capture. The enemy was well supplied with artillery, which was admirably handled, while upon the Union side the few gumms in play did little execution. Colonel McClennan commanded the brigade during the engagement and Major May the regiment. The loss was thirty-nine men wounded, twenty-one captured and eight missing. Captain George W. Guss was among the wounded and Captain Richard T. Stewart among the prisoners. The division retired to Baltimore and encamped at Druid Hill Park, and Early pushed on towards Washington; but here he was met by the rest of the Sixth Corps and driven ingloriously into Virginia. The Union forces joined in pursuit and pushed him to beyond Berryville, in time Shenandoah Valley, Ricketts' division having in the mean time rejoined the corps. And now, for a period of nearly a month, during the intense heat of the season, marches and counter-marches between Washington and the Shenandoah Valley, over the soil of Maryland and Virginia, followed, apparently to little purpose.

Finally a new department was created and General Sheridan assigned to its command. His army was composed of the Sixth, Eighth and Nineteenth Corps, with a force of cavalry sent from the Army of the Potomac. Manoeuvring at once commenced, by which the enemy was drawn from his stronghold at Fisher's Hill. On the 29th of August the cavalry, under Merritt, supported by Ricketts' division, met and defeated a body of the enemy near Smithfield.

Encouraged by this success, at two A.M. on the morning of the 19th of September, Sheridan moved from his camp at Berryville to attack Early, resting on the line of the Opequan six miles away. By daylight the stream was crossed, and dispositions were at once made for attack. The One Hundred and Thirty-eighth occupied the first line in the brigade, with the Sixth Maryland and Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania on its right and left. The first attack was made by the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps, in which a decided advantage was gained, but was lost by a fatal gap between the two corps, which, widening as they advanced, allowed the enemy to break through. Some confusion resulted; but the command was soon rallied, when the grand advance was made, and under a terrific fire of musketry and artillery it swept forward full upon his front, and at every point was victorious, the enemy retreating in precipitation and confusion. The pursuit was continued to Fisher's Hill, where he was found prepared to offer formidable resistance. Ricketts' division occupied a position in front of a strong rebel earthwork on the extreme right of the line, and when the Eighth Corps, under Crook, had, by a mountain-path, turned that flank, the whole line moved simultaneously upon the enemy and again drove him in utter rout, making extensive captures of prisoners, guns and small-arms. The loss of the regiment in these engagements was four killed, thirty-nine wounded and three missing. The army now moved on in pursuit, in three columns, preceded by a line of skirmishers, of which the regiment formed part, and in a re-encounter near New Market with his rear guard suffered some loss in wounded. At Harrisonburg the pursuit was stayed, and the army soon after returned and went into camp at Cedar Creek, the enemy returning subsequently with reinforcements and taking position in his favorite stronghold at Fisher's Hill.

A little after midnight of the 18th of October the rebel army was led from its camp, and stealthily approaching the Union camp, at daybreak, turned the left of the line, where the Eighth Corps lay, and taking it in reverse, swept it back, the rout soon communicating to the Nineteenth Corps, which stood next. The Sixth Corps had time to rally, and offered some resistance, but was finally withdrawn to Middletown, where a new line was taken up and the corps effectively rallied. Here Sheridan, who had been absent in the early part of the day, joined them, and a general advance was sounded. The One Hundred and Thirty-eighth held manfully its place in the severe conflict which followed, and shared in the glorious victory which resulted. The loss was two killed and forty wounded. Lieutenants Samuel W. Cloward, John A. Gump, William B. Lovett and Martin S. Bortz were among the wounded, the two former mortally. At the opening of this campaign Colonel McClennan, debilitated by sickness, was obliged to leave the command, and the regiment was led throughout by Major May. On the 2nd of November the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth, with other troops, was taken to Philadelphia, where it remained in camp until the 11th, when it returned to the army, now in camp near Winchester.

Early in December the corps returned to its place in the army before Petersburg, taking position between the Ninth and Second Corps, vacated by the Fifth. The One Hundred and Thirty-eighth was detailed to garrison Fort Dushane, an earth work on the rear line of defenses near the Weldon Railroad. At Christmas a bountiful repast was provided by friends of the regiment in Montgomery County, and a beautiful stand of colors was presented, a gift from "Loyal Citizens of Norristown and Bridgeport, Pa." In acknowledgment of the latter gift, an elaborate address, breathing intense devotion to the national cause, was prepared and sent to the donors.

At midnight on the 1st of April the regiment joined the corps, and took position in the third line, a general assault having been ordered along the whole front upon the enemy's works. At four o'clock in the morning of the 2nd the signal of advance was given, and moving forward under a raking musketry and enfilading artillery fire, through tangled underwood and ditches, the Sixth Corps carried the works in its front, sweeping everything before it. Pursuit of the flying foe was immediately given, the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth following up in a northwesterly direction for nearly two miles, making numerous captures.(17*) Returning to the point where it first crossed the rebel works, it participated in the charge upon the rebel fort last taken by the division, suffering some loss. The losses in the operations of the entire day were sixteen wounded, Captain James B. Heebner and Lieutenant J. P. Iredell being of the number. Immediate pursuit was commenced, and at Sailor's Creek the corps came up with the enemy's main body drawn up at a commanding position beyond the stream. Crossing this and the marshy bottom through which it courses, the First and Third Divisions assaulted in the face of a galling fire, and routed the foe, capturing prisoners in excess of their own numbers. The loss of the regiment was three killed and seven wounded, and here its fighting ended. Three days thereafter Lee surrendered, and the event was celebrated with every demonstration of rejoicing through all the camps. Two weeks later the corps made a forced march of a hundred miles to Danville, to the support of Sherman. But its co-operation was not needed, and it returned to Richmond by rail, and thence marched to the neighborhood of Washington, where, on the 23d of June, it was mustered out of service.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

C.L.K. Sumwalt, col., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; discharged March 30, 1863. M.R. McClennan, col., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; promoted from Capt. Co. A to lieutenant-col. Sept. 2, 1862; to col. May 2, 1863; brevet brig.-gen. April 2, 1865; wounded at Mine Run, Va;, Nov. 27, 1863; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

Lewis A. May, lieutenant col., mustered in Aug. 29, 1862; promoted from maj. Feb. 12, 1865; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

Jacob W. Cress. adjt., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. B Aug. 30, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

Edward B. Moore, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted to capt. and com. sub. U.S.V. Aug. 4, 1864; brevet maj.; must. out July 31, 1865.

David L. McKenzie, quartermaster, mustered in Aug. 16, 1862; promoted from com. sergt. July 6, 1864; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

C.P. Herrington, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 13, 1862: promoted from assist. surgeon 48th Regiment P.V. Oct. 30, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 4, 1863.

Charles E. Cady, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 3, l862; promoted from assist. surgeon Jan. 22, 1864; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

Thomas C. Thornton, assist, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 12, 1862; promoted to surgeon 67th Regiment P.V. April 20, 1865.

Thomas P. Tomlinson, assist. surgeon, mustered in May 17, 1865; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

James F. Porter, chap., mustered in Sept. 7, 1862; res. June, 26, 1863.

James W. Curry, chap., mustered in March 21, 1863; discharged by special order March 8, l864.

John W. Feight, chap., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. F Feb. 21, 1865; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

H.C. Grossman, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 16, 1862; promoted from corp. Co B Sept. 1, 1862; to 2nd lieutenant Co. B April 9, 1864.

Timothy Kane, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; pro from priv. Co C April 26, 1864; to 1st lieutenant Co. C Dec. 1, 1864.

Osceola Lewis. sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; promoted from priv. Co. I Dec. 12, 1864; to 1st lieutenant Co. I May 16, 1865.

Reuben Hallowell, sergt.-maj., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. I May 16, 1865; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

James W. Kennedy, quartermaster sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. I Sept. 15, 1862; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

Franklin Ramsey, Com. sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted from priv. Co. A July 6, 1864; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

James G. Wells, hosp. stew., mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; promoted from priv. Co. K Sept. 1, 1862; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

Lawrence Deifabaugh, prin. mus., mustered in Aug. 29, 1862; promoted from mus. Co. E Feb. 3, 1864 must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.

William Earle, prin. mus., mustered in Sept. 3, 1862; promoted from mus. Co. I Oct. 30, 1864; must. out with regiment June 23, 1865.


COMPANY A.

M.R. MeClennan, capt.. mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; promoted to lieutenant-col. Sept 2, 1862.

Charles Y. Fisher, capt., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862 promoted from 1st lieutenant Oct. 23 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; discharged Sept. 17, 1864.

James B. Heebner, Capt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted from sergt. to 1st sergt. Sept. 19, 1862; to capt. Dec. 2, 1864; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864, and at Sailor's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel J. Yarger, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; promoted from 2nd lieutenant Oct. 23, 1862; discharged Sept. 12, 1864.

John Dalbey, 1st lieutenant mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Opequant, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; promoted from sergt. Dec. 2, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John E. Essick, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. Oct. 3, 1862; died May 11 of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Daniel A. Reiff, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted from corp. to sergt. July 1, 1864; to 2nd lieutenant April 3, 1865; wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John Benton Major, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted from Corp. to sergt. Dec. 1, 1864; to 1st sergt. May 13, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Harrison Bickle, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Wilderness May 6, and at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; promoted from sergt. Dec. 1, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. May 12, 1865.

Egbert B. Buzley, sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Wildernes, Va., May 6, 1864; promoted from Corp. Dec. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Adam J. Schrack, sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted from corp. April 3, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel A. Moore, sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted from corp. Sept. 19, 1862; to sergt. May 13, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Williams, sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted to corp. Dec. 1, 1864; to sergt. May 13, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Lorenzo D. Shearer, sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted from corp. Sept. 19, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. May 12, 1865.

Davis W. Roberts, sergt., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Washington, D.C., June 14, of wounds received at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864.

James Crozier, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted to corp. Dec. 1, 1864; discharged by special order June 30, 1865.

Joseph K. Moore, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted to corp. Dec. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Elbridge Griffith, Corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; promoted to corp. Dec. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Crary Stewart, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; promoted to corp. Dec. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William H. Myer, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted to corp. April 5, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Adam Hersh, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; promoted to corp. April 5, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Eugene Shearer, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted to corp. May 13, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel L. Welde, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted to Corp. May 13, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John H. Slingluff, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died May 6, 1864, of wounds received at Wilderness, Va.

Paul A. Smith, corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 19, of wounds received at Oqequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.

Morris E. Hinkle, Corp., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; killed at Sailor's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865.

George H. Buck, musician, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel Mitchell, musician, mustered in Jan. 30, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Privates.

Samuel S. Anderson, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George E. Apple, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862 must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John E. Ashford, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John T. Bailey, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Peter E. Bean, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Reuben Bankis, mustered in Feb. 11, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry Bitton, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. March 15, 1865.

William T. Benner, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; transferred to Co. A, 24th Regiment Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 10, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 28, 1865.

Franklin B. Bond, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; transferred to 51st Co., 2nd Batt. Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 25, 1865; discharged on surgeon certif. April 21, 1865.

Jacob Colflesh, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jacob Colter, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Franklin Cooker, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. dut with company June 23, 1865.

Preston Custer, mustered in Jan. 30, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

W. Coppleberger, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. May 12, 1865.

Alex. Cuthbertson, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. May 18, 1865.

Henry Colter, must, in Aug. 19, 1862; died July 14, of wounds received at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, Antietam, section 26, lot E, grave 518.

William Dutlinger, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James W. Davis, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; discharged by G.O. June 14, 1865.

George De Haven, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Evans, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Peter S. Eddleman, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; killed at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.

Benjamin Fisher, mustered in Feb. 11, 1865; discharged by G.O. July 3, 1865.

John H. Griffith, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; prisoner from May 6, 1864, to Feb. 27, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Abraham Gotwaltz, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Winchester, Va., Oct. 11, of wounds received at Opequan Sept. 19, 1864.

Samuel Grubb, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Washington, D.C., June 9, of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Philip Hahn, Jr., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John Harrold, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; prisoner from June 13, 1864, to Feb. 26, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Joseph Hampton, mustered in Jan. 28, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George Hunter, mustered in Aug. 9, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Benjamin D. Harrar, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Spottsylvania

Court-House, Virginia, May 12, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 15, 1865.

William H. Hunter, mustered in Dec. 14, 1863 transferred to U.S. Navy April 19, 1864.

Joseph S. Hollowell, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Simpson Hospital, Md., Dec. 11, 1862.

James Henry, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862.

William H. Isett, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Joseph W. Jones, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jeremiah Jones, mustered in Jan. 16, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Richard Jones, mustered in Jan. 28, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Richard M. Johnson, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jacob D. Jackson, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Jessops Cut, Md., Nov. 25, 1862.

Henry S. Keeley, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company J June 23, 1865.

David R. Krieble, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William H. Koplin, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Isaac Kennedy, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862.

David H. Lukemms, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William R. Lyle, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William K. Lukens, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out W company June 23, 1865.

William Lynn, mustered in Jan. 14, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Edward H. Linck, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; captured; died at Salisbury, N.C., Jan. 17, 1865.

Isaac M. Miller, mustered in Feb. 11, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Michael Murphy, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; discharged by G.O. May 10, 1865.

William Magee, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died Nay 9, of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Joseph Noblit, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June23, l865.

James Noblit, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va.. Nov. 27, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Nobiit, mustered in Jan. 30, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James Nolan, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel Nuss, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Abraham Newcomer, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862 discharged on surgeon certif. Aug. 25, 1863.

Jefferson Ortlip, mustered in Jan. 14, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles Pyle, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles Pugh, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 1, 1864.

Thomas H. Ramsey, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Horatio Royer, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Joseph Rhinehart, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry C. Rhoads, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Lewis K. Reigle, mustered in Jan. 9, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Levi Ringler, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 24. 1864.

Franklin Ramsey, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; promoted to com. sergt. July 6, 1864.

George W. Ross, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Washington. D.C., Sept. 25, 1863.

William Rodenbaugh, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Frederick July 20, of wounds received at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, Antietam, section 26, lot E, grave 529.

Jacob Schock, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; mustered out with company June 23, 1865.

David M. Snyder, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Albert W. Streeper, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Simpson, mustered in Jan. 31, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Archibald Stewart, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; died at Washington, D.C., June 15, of wounds received at Cold Harbor, Va., June 9, l864 buried in National Cemetery, Arlington.

Sylvester Stahley, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; killed at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864.

Milton Streeper. mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; missing in action at Wi1derness, Va., May 6, 1864.

David Updegrove, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864, and at Sailor's Creek, Va., April 2, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Watson Wilde, mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Michael Wheeler, mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry C. Wells, mustered in Aug. 30, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1863.

George M. Williams, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Wilkinson, mustered in Jan. 30, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.


COMPANY C.

George W. Guss, capt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 15, 1865.

William Neiman, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Aug. 22, 1863.

Samuel W. Cloward, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. Sept. 5, 1863; died Nov. 1, of wounds received at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864.

Timothy Kane, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; promoted from sergt.-maj. Dec. 1, 1864; brev. capt. April 6, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John A. Wills, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Aug. 13, 1863.

Matthews T. Server, mustered in 1st sergt., Aug. 20, 1862; promoted from sergt. Jan. 14, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry S. Smith, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged Jan. 14, 1865, for wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Charles R. Jones, sergt., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; promoted from corp. Nov. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel B. Salsburg, sergt., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; promoted from corp. March 1, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Sylvester Makens, sergt., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; promoted from corp. March 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jason T. Butler, sergt., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, and at Cedar Creek, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; promoted from corp. June 1, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel Aikins, sergt., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged May 30, 1865, for wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

C.H. Fitzgerald, sergt., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged Feb. 14, 1865, for wounds received at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.

Benjamin Uebele, sergt, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; missing in action at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864.

Joseph R. Moyer, corp., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James R. Griffiths, corp., mustered in Aug, 20, 1862; prisoner from May 6 to Dec. 23, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 12, 1865.

H.H. Shainline. corp., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jesse Slingluff, Corp., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George E. Lowery, corp., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864, must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles Pennypacker, corp., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; promoted to corp. March 1, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Aaron R. Selah, corp., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; promoted to Corp. March 1, 1865: must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Edward H. Smith, corp., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862 wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; promoted to corp. June 1, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Michael Lightcap, corp., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862.

Edwin S. Sutch, mus., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Foreman, mus., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged onsurgeon certif. Dec. 11, 1863.

Privates.

David F. Anderson, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Cedar Creek Va., oct. 19, 1864; absent, in hospital, at muster out.

Charles A. Bodey, mustered in March 8, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Levi Cutler, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William H. Coulson, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862;wounded in action May 20, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry P. Cornog, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va,, May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 28, 1865.

Charles Craft, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel Cornell, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

John Cole, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Leidy Cook, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; died at Norristown, Pa., Dec. 7, 1862.

William Carson, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded and missing in action at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864.

Marpold Davis, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel H. Dean, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jacob H. Dotts, mustered in March 23, 1863; wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles Dell, mustered in Jan, 21, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Daniel Deweese, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 7, 1863.

Isaac Dickenson, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 20, 1863.

David L. Dotts, mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; missing in action at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864.

Jacob Emery, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Fullerton, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862.; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jesse O. Fitzgerald, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry Freese, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must, out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry Fulmer, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Foreman, mustered in March 29, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Isaac P. Freese, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 27, of wounds received at Cold Harbor, Va., June 6, 1864.

Enos Godshalk, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles Garber, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1862.

Eugene Griffiths, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 24, 1863.

John F. Houston, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Joseph S. Hauley, mustered in March 7, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William H. Jones, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Isaiah T. Johnson, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; disch, on surgeon certif. April 24, 1863.

John M. Jones, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862.

William F. Jones, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; missing in action at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864.

John Knause. mustered in Aug. 20, l862; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 16, 1865.

Hillary R. Lightcap, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 21. 1863.

William H. Moore, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 8, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Winfield S. Markley, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Abraham Markley, mustered in March 17, 1863; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; absent, on furlough, at muster out.

Jesse S. Moyer, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles W. Makens, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, and at Opequan Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Amos Mitchell, mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James E. Miller, mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jesse A. Myers, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., Sept. 20, 1864; grave 9,339.

Daniel M. Noblit, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Neiman, mustered in Feb. 10, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

Jesse H. Orner, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; captured at Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; must. out with comupany June 23, 1865.

Christopher Oxinger, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 22, 1864.

Lewis F. Ott, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862.

Allen Quarmby, mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; discharged April 10, 1865, for wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

C. Rhodenbaugh, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Ferdinand Seaman, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Abraham B. Sutch, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; absent, in hospital, at must. out.

Thomas B. Sutch, mustered in Feb. 24, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Richard N. Shinn, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George Stiver, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Wilmner Still, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Currin F. Smith, mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James C. Saylor, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded in action May 20, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Thomas Stewart, mustered in March 8, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Albert Spangler, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. April 4, 1865.

W.F. Sensenderfer, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; trans to Vet, Res. Corps, date unknown.

Joseph R. Skean, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

A. Vanfossen, Jr., mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., date unknown.

Jesse Wagner, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Wills, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 12, 1865.

George W. Wilson, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Jan. 7, 1865; discharged on surgeon certif. April 20, 1865.

Isaac C. Yost, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles A. Yost, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862.


COMPANY I.

Augustus G. Feather, capt., mustered in Sept. 2, 1862; discharged Sept. 13, 1864.

Jonathan T. Rorer, capt., mustered in Aug. 29, 1862; promoted from 1st lieutenant Oct. 1, 1864; bvt. maj. Oct. 19, 1864; discharged by S.O. April 5, 1865.

William C. Ensly, capt., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. to 1st lieutenant Nov. 1, 1864; bvt. capt. April 6, 1865; to capt. May 15, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Osceola Lewis, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; promoted from sergt.-maj. May 16, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John H. Fisher, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 3, 1862; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

George H. Rees, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; promoted from sergt. Nov. 1, 1864; com. 2nd lieutenant April 6, 1865; not mustered; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Shoffner, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

David D. Bath, sergt., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Sylvester W. Snyder, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864, and at Sailor's Creek April 6, 1865; discharged by G.O. May 31, 1865.

John Shoffner, sergt., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; promoted from corp. May 16, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James W. Kennedy, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted to quartermaster-sergt. Sept. 15, 1862.

Reuben Hallowell, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted to corp. April 30, 1864; to sergt. Nov. 1, 1864; to sergt.- maj. May 16, 1865.

Joseph Scattergood, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; prisoner from July 9, 1864, to March, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 21, 1865.

Trustrim Connell, Corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Staats V.D. Wack, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1st, and at Cedar Creek Oct. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John W. Stoker, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Matthias Tyson, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Edward Sprogell, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Wilderness Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John Cook, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; promoted to corp. April 4, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Benjamin Althouse, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted to corp. May 16, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Callahan, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; transferred to Sig. Corps March 1, 1864.

George H. Klop, corp., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; died May 17th of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Christian Kastler, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; promoted to corp. Nov. 1, 1864; died April 3d, of wounds received at Petersburg April 2, 1865.

Samuel M. Lewis, mus., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Earle, mus., mustered in Sept. 3, 1862; promoted to principal musician Oct. 30, 1864.

Privates.

Thomas Altemus, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 18, 1863.

John S. Bennett, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John Batman, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Isaac Bennett, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Josiah Batman, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Edward Baker, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Barnick, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William W. Bennett, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Jan. 28, 1865.

William Batman, mustered in Sept. 3, 1862, killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Philip Badman, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged by G.0. June 21, 1865.

R.F. Crouthamel, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; missing in action at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27. 1863.

Reuben C. Climer, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862.

Edmund Dolby, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Paul Dier, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Diemer, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William G. Evans, mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles H. Earle, mustered in Sept. 3, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William Eppright, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died at Baltimore, Md., July 29th of wounds of received at Monocacy July 9, 1864.

John G. Fry, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Peter Frey, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 18, 1863.

John Hallman, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

W.W. Hendricks, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Joseph D. Hagey, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864, and at Petersburg April 2, 1865; absent, in hospital, at must. out.

John Hurd, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James M. Hay, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Harry R. Hughes, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Joseph Holt, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, l863; discharged on surgeon certif. Aug. 10, 1864.

Harrison Hinkle, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged by G.O. May 16, 1865.

John F. Hay, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 16, 1865.

William H. Heritage, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Jan. 7, 1865.

Samuel R. Ireton, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., Oct. 10, 1864; grave 10,616.

Eli Long, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel P. Moore, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles Maurer, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Mahlon Murry, mustered in Feb. 15, 1864; absent, sick, at must. out.

Joseph Michener, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died June 8th, of wounds received at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864.

Jeremiah Mitchell, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862.

William H. Pugh, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James Parks, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles Prinzing, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Reese Pugh, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps March 17, 1864.

William Renner, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Peter Reinholt, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Simon K. Renner, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 18, 1863.

Benjamin F. Roberts, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; discharged by special order May 5, 1865.

Christian Rudolph, mustered in Jan. 30, 1865; discharged on surgeon certif. May 12, 1865.

Joseph J. Roberts, mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; died at Relay House, Md., Nov. 5, 1864.

Joseph Rohr, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; killed at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864.

David F. Shelmire, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Otto Schoenian, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Seth C. Smith, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Aug. Schodstadt, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John Seifert, mustered in Aug. 16, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1564; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Smith, mustered in Feb. 27, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Christian Stagner, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Henry Swartley, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Jacob Tyson, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jonas Tranger, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William E. Tucker, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Eli Thomas, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died near Relay House, Md., Feb. 11, 1863.

William H. Vansant, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William H. Watson, mustered in Aug, 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Saul M. Wilkinson, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Joseph L. Williams, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Spottsylvania

Court-House, Va., May 12, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles L. Williams, mustered in Feb. 27, 1865; absent, on furlough, at must. out.

Joshua Wood, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Feb. 18, 1863.

James Wilson, mustered in Sept. 3, 1862; killed at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19,

1864.


COMPANY K.

Richard T. Stewart, Capt., mustered in Oct. 2, 1862; captured at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; discharged by special order May 15, 1865.

Amos W. Bertolett, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 3, 1862; discharged by special order Jan. 23, 1863.

Jonathan P. Iredell, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Oct. 2, 1862; promoted from 2nd lieut, Feb. 5, 1863; com. capt. May 18, 1865; not must.; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1st, at Opequan Sept. 19, 1864, and at Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Abraham H. Kline, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. Feb. 5, 1863; discharged Aug. 17, 1863.

Israel C. Wood, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; promoted from sergt. April 7, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles B. Thompson, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted from sergt. Jan. 30, 1863; com. 2nd lieutenant Aug. 18, 1863; not must.; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Stokes C. Bodder, 1st sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted from sergt. May 8, 1864; wounded at Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; killed at Sailor's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865.

Jacob W. Trout, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted from corp. April 13, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

William H. Shively, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted from Corp. Jan. 30, 1813; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George R. Palmer, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted from corp. June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Lewis P. Yetter, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted to corp. Jan. 30, 1863; to sergt. April 7, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Barc'y Kenderdine, sergt., mustered in Sept. 11, 1862; promoted to corp. Aug. 8, 1863; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles W. Umstead, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted to corp. June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Benjamin F. Walton, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; promoted to Corp. Dec. 29, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John H. Smith, sergt., mustered in Sept. 10, 1862; promoted to Corp. April 7, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Charles R. Magee, sergt., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; promoted to corp. April 7, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry H. Umstead, corp., mustered in Sept. 10, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; promoted to corp. April 7, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

J.B. Undercoffer, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Sept. 27, 1863 ; promoted to corp. April 7, 1865; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Elias Lewis, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va. Sept. 27, 1863; discharged on surgeon certif. April 24, 1864.

Charles Wood, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. April 28, 1864.

Samuel Hallman, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 13, 1865.

William P. Iredell, corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died at Sharpsburg, Md., July 16, 1863.

Solomon Sabold, corp., mustered in Sept. 10, 1862; promoted to Corp. Aug. 8, 1863; died at Brandy Station, Va., Feb. 20, 1864.

J.H. Ashenfelter, Corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted to corp. Aug. 8, 1863; killed at Wilderness May 5, 1864.

Daniel Kulp, Corp., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; promoted to Corp. April 13, 1863; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Augustus Hoffman, Corp., mustered in Sept. 10, 1862; promoted to Corp. Oct. 20, 1862.

John Lingle, mus., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

L.P. Heffelfinger, mus., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Privates.

George W. Ashton, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with Company June 23, 1865.

Pierson Allen, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Samuel E. Bright, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Servatus S. Brey, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George R. Brown, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John Blaker, mustered in June 4, 1863; absent, on furlough, at must. out.

William B. Biddle, mustered in Aug. 31, 1864; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; absent, in hospital, at must. out.

James Berks, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; discharged on surgeon certif. March 7, 1864.

George H. Burke, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Benjamin Brayman, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Enos N. Benner, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862.

James Cannon, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; transferred to 38th Co., 2nd Batt., Vet. Res. Corps; discharged by G.O. Aug. 4, 1865.

John Cratz, mustered in Sept. 10, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George W. Dutter: mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Spottsylvauuia

Court-house May 13th, and at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; must. out with company Juue 23, 1865.

John Donahue, mustered in April 8, 1863; discharged by G.O. June 16, 1865.

Josiah Emery, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Edward D. Ervin, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; transferred to 2nd Batt. Vet. Res. Corps March 7, 1865; discharged by G.O. Aug. 26, 1865.

Joshua Emery, mustered in Sept. 10, 1862.

Owen Emery, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862.

Peter L. Fluck, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died at Frederick, Md., Aug. 6th, of wounds received at Monocacy July 9, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, Antietam, section 26, lot E, grave 525.

Noah B. Gebphart, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Conrad Hoffnagle, mustered in Sept. 29, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Jacob Huzzard, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862.

Silas Kingkiner, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John D. Kelley, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; captured at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry Kulp, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Michael Kelley, mustered in Aug. 31, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1863.

David Kingkiner, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died at Relay House, Md., April 22, 1863.

Daniel Linker, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with comupany June 23, 1865.

Charles T. Lukens, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. April 12, 1865.

Jeremiah Lesher, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; missing in action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Charles Mostler, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John Murphy, mustered in May 18, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry C. Moser, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863, and at Wilderness May 6, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 2, 1865.

Amos Mullen, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died at Elk Ridge Landing, Md., Oct. 25, 1862.

Patrick Monagan, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; died at Brandy Station, Va., March 13, 1864, of accidental wounds.

John F. Miller, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Rinehart P. March, mustered in Sept. 10, 1862; died at Alexandria, Va., May 25th, of wounds received at Wilderness May 6, 1864.

Aaron Mattis, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; captured at Wilderness, Va., May, 1864; died at Andersonville, Ga., Oct. 12, 1864; grave 10,803.

Sylvester Merrick, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; captured at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; died at Danville, Va., Oct. 13, 1864.

Dennis McCabe, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Stephen McCullough, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; captured at Andersonville, Ga., Sept. 19, 1864; grave 9922.

Bernard McMahon, mustered in Sept. 30, 1862.

William Neff, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Henry Nicholas, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864; discharged on surgeon certif. April 15, 1865.

Charles O'Neil, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862.

Hiram M. Puff, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Wildernsss, Va., May 6th, and at Opequan, Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

George H. Paulus, mustered in Sept. 10, 1862; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; must. out with comnpany June 23, 1865.

Franklin Roads, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Horace Rosenberry, mustered in March 16, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

Henry C. Seigfreid, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Monocacy, Md., July 9, 1864; discharged by G.O. July 1, 1863.

Eli Sabold, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Issachar Shoemaker, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Dec. 22, 1864.

Edwin Steiner, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; missing in action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

William Trear, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862.

J.W. Undercoffer, mustered in March 18, 1864; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 6, and at Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865; must. out with Company June 23, 1865.

Jonas Undercoffer, mustered in March 18, 1864; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

Thomas Whalon, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; absent, sick, at muster-out.

Enos R. Wasser, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John Weid, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

John A. Woodhust, mustered in Sept. 29, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.

James G. Wells, mustered in Aug. 23, 1862; promoted to hospital steward Sept. 1, 1862.

John Zeigler, mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; must. out with company June 23, 1865.



One Hundred and Sixtieth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Fifteenth (Anderson) Cavalry

(three years' service).(18*) - 160th Regiment

This regiment was recruited in the autumn of 1862, by order of the Secretary of War, and was designed for special service. Captain William J. Palmer, who had previously organized an independent company known in history as the Anderson Troop, departed from the usual rule of permitting the enlisted men to elect the line and field officers, the recruits "having by their terms of enlistment waived their right to choose their own officers." The duty of selecting line, field and staff officers for a new regiment imposed a task of more than ordinary responsibility, and the men who patriotically waived the privilege, universally accorded to all Pennsylvania troops, subsequently learned by a painful experience that the selection of subordinate officers is attended with a measure of dissatisfaction not less marked than that which prevails where they are made the subject of popular choice. Home associations were not recognized in the organization of this regiment, nor in the appointment and assignment of line officers to duty. The promotion of line officers was not by company, as was the custom among Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was thought judicious to adopt the rule prevailing in the regular army, and promote by seniority throughout the regiment, the senior captain always being in command of Company A and the junior captain in command of Company M, and the same of lieutenants. The recruits were mustered into the service at Carlisle, Pa. Officers were assigned them who, by the aid of the post-officers of the regular army then stationed at Carlisle, commenced instruction and drill. The incursion of Lee into Maryland in the month of September, threatening Western Pennsylvania, induced great activity among all the troops then in process of organization, and this regiment, with those in camp at Harrisburg, were put in marching orders, and their first experience in the hardships of active service was realized in their native State. Their historian says,
"The regiment was ordered to remain in the Cumberland Valley, and two hundred and fifty picked men, with three days' rations and thirty-six rounds of ammunition per man, were ordered to the front. They proceeded by rail to Greencastle, where the detachment procured horses for one hundred and fifty of their number, and with these they picketed all the public roads leading south, the enemy being in force at or near Hagerstown. The outposts came in conflict with the enemy on the 12th and 13th of September and acquitted themselves with credit. These troops were on duty during the battle of Antietam, and subsequently, on the 18th of September, Captain Palmer, who was to be commissioned colonel of the regiment, while in discharge of hazardous and difficult duty within the enemy's lines, was captured and sent to Richmond. Upon the retreat of Lee south of the Potomac the entire detachment returned to their camp at Carlisle, having returned to the good people in the neighborhood of Greencastle the horses used in their first campaign."


The capture of Captain Palmer at this critical juncture proved a great misfortune, as the command was left without a head. On the 1st of October, William Spencer, first lieutenant of the troop, was commissioned lieutenant-colonel, Adolph C. Rosengarten and Frank B. Ward, majors, and the regiment was organized in ten companies. A full list of company officers was presented to the proper authorities for appointment, but only eleven of these were commissioned. On the 7th of November the regiment moved by rail to Louisville, Ky., where, upon its arrival, it went into camp, and was mounted, A month later it was ordered forward to Nashville, where the main army, now under command of General Rosecrans, was assembled. At this time the command had seven field and staff officers, twelve line and about two-thirds of its complement of non-commissioned officers. On the 25th a detachment of two hundred and fifty men was sent out as guard to a foraging train, and while beyond the lines, on the Hillsboro pike, was attacked, and one man killed; but the enemy was beaten back, and the laden train brought safely in.

The army was now upon the eve of advancing to meet Bragg in the battle of Stone River. On the 26th an order was issued for the regiment to advance with General Stanley's division of cavalry. Much dissatisfaction had prevailed previous to leaving Louisville on account of the want of officers and the lack of efficiency in the organization; but the men had determined to march to Nashville, and there lay their grievances before General Rosecrans, all appeals to Governor Curtin and to the Secretary of War having proved fruitless. Rosecrans was now busy with the movement of his forces, and could not be seen. With only a single commissioned officer to the company, the command was really in no condition to move; but the order for it was peremptory. The officers, with about three hundred of the men, under the leadership of Majors Rosengarten and Ward, rendered prompt obedience. The remainder, to the number of about six hundred, stacked arms and refused to go. Stanley covered the right flank of the advancing army, and on the 27th came up with the enemy, when brisk skirmishing opened, and the enemy was driven back nearly five miles. On the 29th the command marched by a circuitous route to Wilkinson's Cross Roads, where it encountered a body of rebel cavalry. Deploying skirmishers, the enemy was driven a mile, when a charge was ordered, and was led by Majors Rosengarten and Ward. Gallantly the command went forward, but soon encountered the enemy's infantry in overpowering numbers. The struggle was maintained with desperate valor, and at close quarters, the men using their pistols and clubbing their carbines. At the height of the encounter Major Rosengarten was killed, and Major Ward mortally wounded. The battalion was finally forced to retire. Major Ward, who had been helped to the rear, insisted upon another charge, though bleeding from several wounds. The attempt was made, but the command was again repulsed. The loss was thirteen killed or mortally wounded and sixty-nine wounded and missing. The command now devolved on Captain Vezin, and, with the First Tennessee Cavalry, it moved in pursuit of the enemy's horse, which had destroyed a Union wagon-train. All night long the march continued, but without avail. On the afternoon of the 31st it joined General Minty's brigade in a charge on Wheeler's cavalry, led by General Stanley in person, in which the enemy was driven in upon his supports. In this charge, Private Holt, of Company H, captured and brought off the colors of the Tenth Tennessee (rebel) Cavalry, on which was inscribed: "Death before Subjugation." At night the command was advanced and deployed in line of skirmishers, where it remained until the morning of the New Year. The enemy, who had gained a signal advantage in the morning of the 31st, routing and driving back the right wing of Rosecrans' army, had been stopped and signally repulsed at evening. There was little more hard fighting, the enemy retreating rapidly on the 3d, and leaving the field in the hands of the Union army. On the morning of the 1st the battalion, with the Third Ohio, was detailed to guard a train on its way back to Nashville, and was twice attacked, losing four killed and three wounded.

In the mean time General Mitchell, in command at Nashville, determined to compel the men who remained in camp to go to the front, and accordingly sent General Morgan, on the 30th, to execute his purpose. Upon the offer of General Morgan to take them to General Rosecrans they were soon in saddle, and all, save a detachment left in charge of the camp and the sick, were upon the march, under command of Colonel Woods, of an Illinois regiment, who had been detailed by General Morgan to command them. At Lavergue they were stopped by a powerful body of the enemy's cavalry, under command of Wheeler. Unable to cope with him, Colonel Woods was compelled to fall back, Famishing with hunger, neither men nor horses having had regular supplies for many days, one hundred of the number went into camp six miles from Nashville, and on the following day made their way to the front, but the remainder returned to their old camp near the city, from which they refused again to move, and on the evening of the 31st were sent by General Mitchell to the work-house. On the 20th of January, 1863, General Rosecrans sent them a proposition that if they would return to duty he would have them speedily reorganized and fully officered. As this was all that they were clamoring for, they accepted it. On the 7th of February, Colonel Palmer returned from captivity and resumed command, when everything began again to wear a cheerful aspect. Horses and a full complement of equipments were received, and the regiment was organized in twelve companies, with the following field officers: William J. Palmer, colonel; Charles B. Lamborn, lieutenant-colonel.

Much abuse was heaped upon the men who refused to march, and the wildest rumors prevailed concerning their motives. The rebel organs throughout the South proclaimed that the Yankee soldiers at Nashville were laying down their arms by regiments, in consequence of the issue of the President's emancipation proclamation; whereas, it is probable that not a thought of this proclamation ever entered their counsels. Charges of cowardice and disappointment at not being taken to duty at the headquarters of the commanding general were made, but the lack of organization and of officers, and want of efficient leadership, seems to have been the simple and only cause of their conduct. While the unfortunate situation in which they were placed must ever be deplored, and their refusal to march condemned, the conduct of the men who followed the gallant Rosengarten and Ward, even under the most discouraging circumstances, and met death in the face of the foe, will never cease to be regarded with admiration and gratitude.

Active operations commenced soon after its reorganization. On the 4th of April a detachment of three hundred, with infantry and artillery, all undemcommand of General I.N. Palmer, scouted in the direction of Woodbury, the detachment having a brisk skirmish four miles beyond the town, and on the following day took some prisoners and released some Union conscripts near McMinnville. On the 7th it charged a body of the enemy near the Barrens, capturing eighteen of his men. Returning to camp near Murfreesboro, the regiment was reviewed on the 10th by General Rosecrans.

On the 24th of June the army moved forward on the Chickamauga campaign, when Companies B, H and K were detailed as escort to the general commanding, and the remainder of the regiment was employed for courier duty between the right and left wings of the army, under Generals McCook and Crittenden. The latter was required to obtain a knowledge of the topography of the country in advance of the army, requiring much activity. On the 24th, Companies E and L. while bearing dispatches to General Mitchell, at Rover, encountered a party of the enemy and dispersed it, killing two and capturing several, delivering the dispatches in safety. Again, on the 29th, nearly the entire regiment, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Lamborn, encountered a body of rebel cavalry north of Tullahoma, driving them in upon their intrenchments, and capturing fifteen. It soon after advanced with Thomas to Tullahoma, the enemy retreating. About the middle of August the army again moved forward, and until the opening of the battle of Chickamauga the regiment was kept busy in scouting the country and preparing maps for the use of the general commanding. During the first day of the battle, September 19th, the regiment was on duty at General Rosecrans' headquarters, guarding flank-roads, watching the movements of the enemy and carrying dispatches. When the right gave way, on the second day, Colonel Palmer was ordered by General Rosecrans to form the regiment so as to stop stragglers. The line was formed near the foot of Mission Ridge, west of the Crawfish road, and had stopped a larger number, when the regiment was ordered to the rear by General Sheridan, moving by the top of the ridge to the left. Following the rear of the wagon-trains and battMontgomerys to a point twelve miles south of Chattanooga, Colonel Palmer turned to the left, and formed his regiment across the valley, a mile south of where the trains debouched towards Chattanooga, and sent out scouting-parties in the direction of Pond Spring and Stevens' Gap. The smoke of Colonel Watkins' wagons, which the rebel cavalry were burning at Stevens' Gap, was here visible. Remaining until the cavalry of General Mitchel had come up, the regiment moved on with the rear of the train to Chattanooga. Company L, sent ten miles out on Lookout Mountain to watch the movements of the enemy, was cut off, but succeeded in making its way through his lines, and rejoining the regiment in Chattanooga.

Bragg closed in upon the army of Rosecrans, sending out his cavalry to operate upon his communications. The animals were soon reduced to a starving condition. Colonel Palmer was, accordingly, sent with his cavalry into the Sequatchie Valley, thirty miles away, and encamped on Robinson's plantation, where corn and provisions were found in abundance, and from which supplies were sent to Chattanooga.

Soon after the battle of the 25th of November, which swept Bragg from his strongholds around the city, and gave light and life to the starving army of Thomas, Colonel Palmer was ordered to move to Kingston with his regiment, and join Sherman, now on his way to Knoxville to relieve the beleaguered army of Burnside. Sherman did not cross at Kingston, but kept up the left bank of the Tennessee, and Palmer, consequently, moved forward on the right bank, and was the first to report at Knoxville. On the day following its arrival General Burnside ordered it to Sevierville to meet a body of the enemy, in part Indians, from North Carolina, under Colonel Thomas. Sending a squadron under Lieutenant-Colonel Lamborn to demonstrate in front, Colonel Palmer led the main body, by night, across the mountains by a circuitous route, coming in upon the rear of the rebel force, and by a well-concerted action, attacking at daylight in front and flank, completely routed it, wounding seven and capturing two of the enemy, fifteen horses and twenty stands of arms, and burning the camp. Captains Charles M. Betts and George S. Clark were among the wounded in the engagement. Captain McAllister, with two companies, F and G, was sent in pursuit of the fugitives, but failed to overtake them. The regiment was now engaged in scouting on the left flank, and in rear of Longstreet's army, which was leisurely pursuing its way towards Virginia, extending along the French Broad River as far as Newport, having frequent skirmishes with rebel cavalry, and capturing prisoners from whom important information was gained. On the night of the 23d of December the command crossed the French Broad, and pushing up under cover of darkness to the rear of the enemy's cavalry corps, captured a number of his pickets, thirteen horses and twenty-six head of cattle, and brought them safely into camp, though closely pursued. On the 24th the regiment participated in the battle of Dandridge, which was fought by the brigades of Sturgis and Elliott. After a sharp skirmish the enemy was driven, and in full retreat, but was timely reinforced by a brigade from Morristown, and was thus enabled to make a stand, before which the Union force was obliged to retire. In the fight a spirited dash was made by Colonel Palmer, with ninety of his men, before whom the enemy fled in confusion; but returning, he was fired on by a party in concealment, and ten of his men were dismounted and fell into the hands of the foe. Captain Washington Airey was among these, and for fourteen months endured the hardships and privations of imprisonment, being finally released to die of disease contracted thereby. The entire loss was seventy-five in killed, wounded and prisoners. On the 29th a sharp engagement occurred at Mossy Creek, and after a contest lasting six hours the enemy was handsomely repulsed. Two spirited charges were made by the Fifteenth, gaining and holding an important position on the field, for which it was complimented by General Sturgis. It lost one officer, Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant Harvey S. Lingle, killed, and five men wounded.

Longstreet having put his army in winter-quarters near Russeilville, was sending his cavalry back to the rich corn-fields of the French Broad, Valley for supplies. The Fifteenth had become expert in scouting to ascertain the movements of the enemy and to harass his foraging-parties. It was, accordingly, posted at Dandridge, and charged especially with this duty. For two weeks it scouted the whole country on the enemy's flank, coming down upon him at the most unexpected moments, marching day and night, picking up prisoners and gathering stock almost within the limits of rebel encampments. On the 13th of January, 1863, while in camp opposite Dandridge, Colonel Palmer learned that Brigadier-General Vance, with a force of three hundred cavalry and dismounted Indians, with two pieces of artillery, had advanced from North Carolina, and entered Sevierville, twelve miles in Colonel Palmer's rear, capturing twenty wagons loaded with wheat, belonging to the army at Knoxville, and twenty prisoners. Though a brigade of rebel cavalry was in his front, threatening an attack, Colonel Palmer determined to go in pursuit of Vance. Accordingly, heading a party of one hundred and twenty-five men, and leaving his pickets out to deceive the enemy in his front, he started on his daring mission. On the way he learned that Vance's forces had been divided, one party, including the Indians, going toward North Carolina, the other, headed by Vance himself, with the captured train, taking a back mountain-road towards Newport. After a march of thirty miles Palmer come up with the latter party at a point about eight miles from Newport, and by a bold charge with the sabre captured the general, two of his staff officers, a lieutenant, fifty men, one hundred and fifty horses, the general's ambulance filled with captured medical stores, recaptured the entire wagon-train and prisoners, and brought all back safely to Sevierville. For his gallantry in this affair, Colonel Palmer was strongly recommended by General Foster, in command at Knoxville, seconded by Generals Sturgis and Elliott, for promotion.

On the 24th, Colonel Palmer's command, temporarily reinforced by Colonel Brownlow's First Tennessee Cavalry, made an expedition into the enemy's foraging ground, near the mouth of the Big Pigeon River, and captured a train of eighteen wagons, ninety mules and seventy-two of the enemy, including a captain and three lieutenants, losing one man killed. The country around had become very familiar to the men of Colonel Palmer's command, and full reliance was placed in them for information by which the movements of heavy bodies of troops were guided. They were kept constantly upon the move. The plan of the considerable engagement at Fair Garden, on the 28th, in which three steel guns and one hundred prisoners were taken, was based upon information of the enemy's position and strength furnished by scouting-parties of the Fifteenth. On the following day Colonel Palmer, by taking a flank trail in following the retreating rebels, discovered that they had been reinforced, and by timely warning to the main Union force saved it from disaster. The campaign having now ended, the regiment returned by easy marches to Chattanooga, where it arrived on the 11th of February, and was joined by a part of the regiment which had been left at the camp in Sequatchie Valley. During the three succeeding months the command was kept busy in scouting on the flank of the enemy holding position on Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost and Dalton. In reconnaissances to Lafayette, Summerville, Alpine and Lookout Valley it gained important information and captured some prisoners.

By the hard service during the fall and winter the horses had become completely worn out, and on the 4th of May, as the army was about breaking camp for the spring campaign, the regiment was ordered to Nashville to remount and refit. It was August before the requisite horses, arms and equipments were obtained and the command was in readiness for the field. In the mean time the men had been kept busy in drill and target practice. Captain Betts had been previously promoted to major. On the 8th of August the regiment started for the front, but in consequence of the raid of Wheeler on Sherman's lines of supply, was stopped at Chattanooga, and scouted to Red Clay, Parker's Gap and Spring Place, and upon the movement of Wheeler north, followed him in force, returning finally to Calhoun, where it was employed protecting the railroad. On the 5th of September the regiment, about four hundred strong, was ordered to move north to prevent the return of a force of Wheeler's cavalry, which had been cut off at McMinnville, and was making its way, under Dibberel, to the Tennessee River, below Kingston. It accordingly moved to Sevierville, the enemy keeping up on the opposite side of the river, and finally joining Vaughan near Bristol, Va. From Sevierville, the regiment marched to Bull's Gap, and joined General Gillem in a movement towards Virginia. At Jonesboro', on the 3d of October, where the enemy was encountered, Colonel Palmer, who had the advance, was ordered to develop the enemy's strength and position. He accordingly charged the rebel rear guard, driving it ten miles to the Wautauga River, killing one and capturing eight, where he found Duke in force. On the 4th and 5th there was some skirmishing. But Burbridge was now in the enemy's rear, and he retreated rapidly towards Abingdon. Gillem did not pursue, as Forest was raiding into Tennessee, but returned to Knoxville. Colonel Palmer was, however, permitted, at his own suggestion, to make diversion in favor of Burbridge, and advanced, via Bristol, to Kingsport. Here a party of nine, with dispatches for Burbridge, who had withdrawn to Kentucky, was met. Taking seventy-five picked men, Colonel Palmer started to carry them through, and after five days' severe marching came up with Burbridge at Prestonburg, successfully eluding Prentiss' rebel cavalry, lying in wait for his capture, and attacking one of Prentiss' scouting-parties, killing a captain and one man, and taking twelve prisoners and thirty horses.

In the mean time the remainder of the regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Lamborn, was attacked by Vaughan's forces, which had returned from Virginia. Lamborn held the ford of the North Fork of the Ho1ston against Vaughan for one day, and at night, having no supports, retired towards Bull's Gap, losing in the skirmish one man wounded. On the following day, while crossing a difficult ford of the main stream, he was again attacked by a large force. The command was in column, along the river-bank, the enemy occupying a steep bluff commanding the ford and the road which led to it, over which the column was advancing. A company was sent to the rear of the attacking party, which, coming upon the enemy unawares, made a sudden dash, capturing three officers and eight men, and so disconcerting the entire party that it took to its heels, leaving the Union force, of only one hundred and twenty-five men, to cross and move unmolested to Bull's Gap. Upon their arrival in camp General Gillem complimented them, in an order,
"for their action at Rogerville, October 7th, when in the face of a rebel force much larger than their own, they crossed the Ho1ston River, capturing three rebel lieutenants and eight enlisted men, with no loss."


After this the main body of the regiment and the detachment under Colonel Palmer assembled in camp near Chattanooga, and for two months were engaged in scouting for a long distance on all sides, frequently meeting bands of the enemy. On the 20th of December, Colonel Palmer, with his own and detachments from other regiments to the number of six hundred men, proceeded to Decatur, whence he pushed forward, on the south bank of the Tennessee River, in pursuit of Hood's demoralized troops, now in full retreat from Tennessee, having been thoroughly defeated, in the battle of Nashville, by Thomas.

Without attempting to give the details of this eminently successful expedition, its character may be judged by the following summary of results: The capture of two hundred prisoners, including two colonels, three captains and eight lieutenants, and the destruction of seven hundred and fifty stands of arms; the capture, on the night of December 28th, of two pieces of General Roddy's artillery, with horses and equipments; the capture and complete destruction, on the 31st, of the entire pontoon bridge, having seventy-eight boats, on which Hood crossed the Tennessee River, with two hundred wagons loaded with tools, ropes, engineering instruments and supplies; the capture, on the night of January 1, 1865, of a supply train of Hood of one hundred and ten wagons, while on its way from Benton Station to Tuscaloosa, and its complete destruction; the surprise and complete rout, on the Tuscaloosa road, below Moulton, of the rebel Colonel Russell's regiment of cavalry, Fourth Alabama, and the capture and destruction of his train, with the papers and baggage of the brigade; and the repeated defeat and route of Roddy's forces, causing their disbandment. The entire loss of the command was one man killed and two wounded. It successfully eluded largely superior forces of the enemy while on its return to Decatur, and brought all its captures safely in.

Upon its return the command was ordered to Huntsville for rest, but on the night following its arrival Colonel Palmer was directed to take all his available mounted men and intercept the rebel General Lyon at Fort Deposit. Failing in this, Colonel Palnier crossed the river in pursuit, came up with Lyon on January 16th, surprised his camp before daylight and routed his command, capturing his only piece of artillery and ninety-six prisoners, which were brought off. Lyon himself was taken, but succeeded in making his escape, after shooting the sergeant who had him in charge, - the only loss. Colonel Palmer led out another scouting-party, on the 27th, of one hundred and fifty men in pursuit of a guerilla band, under Colonel Meade, infesting the Cumberlaud Mountains, returning on the 6th of February with one captain, two lieutenants and twenty-three privates as prisoners.

Before starting on the spring campaign fresh horses were supplied and the command was completely refitted for active service. General Stoneman was placed in command of the cavalry, and Colonel Palmer, who had been promoted to brevet brigadier-general, was assigned to the command of the First Brigade of Gillem's division, whereupon Lieutenant-Colonel Betts, who had been promoted from major, took command of the regiment. Towards the close of March, Stoneman started on an important expedition towards North Carolina. On the 29th he reached Wilkesboro', on the Yadkin River, where he had a skirmish. Here he received intelligence which determined him to turn north towards the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, which he fell to destroying, the Fifteenth being actively employed in this work. From this point Major Wagner, with four companies, made a demonstration to within sight of Lynchburg, Va., destroying two important railroad bridges. He rejoined the command, after an absence of ten days, near Salisbury, N.C., having sustained a loss, of one killed and eight wounded and captured. On the 19th of April a detachment of the regiment under Major Garner destroyed a railroad bridge ten miles north of Greensboro, N.C., after a brisk skirmish with the guard. At the same time Lieutenant-Colonel Betts, with ninety men, surprised the camp of the Third South Carolina Cavalry, near Greensboro', and charged upon it, capturing the commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson, four of his officers and forty-four men, with their horses, regimental wagons and camp equipage. On the following day a detachment under Captain Kramer met and defeated a superior force of the enemy at Jamestown, destroying the depot and a truss-covered bridge at Deep River. On the 12th, Salisbury, N.C., was captured and immense rebel stores destroyed, when the command turned towards Knoxville. Towards the close of April, intelligence of the surrender of Lee and Johnson having been received, the division of General Gillem, now commanded by General Palmer, was ordered to proceed south for the capture of Jefferson Davis and train. Night and day, with the most untiring energy and skill, the pursuit was pushed. On the 8th of May seven wagons, containing the effects of the banks of Macon, were captured. "On the morning of the 8th, instant," says General Palmer, in his official report, "while searching for Davis near the fork of the Appalachee and Oconee Rivers, Colonel Betts, Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, captured seven wagons in the woods, which contained one hundred and eighty-eight thousand dollars in coin, one million five hundred and eighty-eight thousand dollars in bank-notes, bonds and securities, and about four millions of Confederate money, besides considerable specie, plate and other valuables belonging to private citizens of Macon. The wagons contained also the private baggage, maps, and official papers of Generals Beauregard and Pillow. Nothing was disturbed, and I sent the whole in by railroad to Augusta to the commanding officer of the United States forces, to await the action of the government." Two days after, Company G, Captain Samuel Phillips, captured General Bragg, his wife, staff officers and three wagons, which were sent under guard to the headquarters of General Wilson. On the 15th news was received of the capture of Davis and party by Colonel Pritchard, of the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, detachments from Colonel Betts' command being close upon his trail. The regiment now started northward, and on the 12th of June arrived at Nashville, where, on the 21st., it was mustered out of service.



RECRUITS FROM MONTGOMERY COUNTY.



Henry K. Weand, mustered into service Aug. 24, 1862; promoted to Corp. Oct. 30, 1862; to sergt. Nov. 1, 1862; to 1st sergt. March 1, 1863; to 1st lieutenant May 5, 1863; com. capt. Co. H, Feb. 20, 1865; must. out with company June 2l, 1865.

Privates.

Jacob Fitzwater, Henry Cress, Charles H. Cress, Robert Dager, Theodore F. Ramsey, Jesiah C. Reiff, O.S. Spang, Fred. Spang, William Spang, Fred. S. Shrack, Abner Evans, John J. Shelmin, Andrew W. Wills, Edwin H. Hiltner, Nicholas F. Dager, Abraham Hartranft, George W. Lukens, Courtland F. McCarter, William Wills, Jr., David R. Conrad, Samuel F. Tyson, Jeshua Johnson, Thomas B. Tucker, Harry Somers, J.R. Steinmetz.

Alexander R. Cutler, of the Philadelphia bar, now residing in Norristown, was a member of this regiment, Co. C; also John W. Eckman, present superintendent of the Montgomery Furnace, at Port Kennedy, and Joseph C. Weatherby, a resident of Norriton township, near Penn Square.



The One Hundred and Sixty-Second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers (Seventeenth Cavalry)

162nd Regiment

- The organization of Company L, composed of men from Montgomery and Chester Counties, was attended with some unusual circumstances, which seem to require special mention. David B. Hartranft proprietor of the Jeffersonville Hotel, Norriton township, received authority to recruit a cavalry company, under the call of President Lincoln, July 2, 1862, for three hundred thousand volunteers to serve for three years or during the war.(19*) Hartranft had been an active member of Captain Leidy's Washington Troop, a volunteer organization in the days of peace, but which melted away, like almost all similar organizations in the country, when active service invited men of arms to the front. The period was favorable to enlistments. The Peninsula campaign, with that of General Pope in front of Washington, had closed in disaster. The ordinary channels of trade and business were paralyzed. The fact was painfully manifest that the struggle was still gathering fury, and, if the unity of the country was to be preserved, men of all classes would have to fill up the dreadful gaps resulting from the ill-fated battles fought in front of Richmond and Washington. Hitherto the young and unmarried men largely filled up the company and regimental organizations accredited to the county, but this call appealed to the patriotism of men of family and those settled in life. Fully fifty per cent. of the company were mounted men. The call was for three years' service or during the war, and the rough experience of those who were then in the field had dispelled all fancy notions of the glitter and pomp of war. Those who were now to march felt that it was a serious matter and this feeling was fully shared by the families of the men and the public in general.

Among those recruited by Hartranft were fifty men in temporary camp at Zeiglersville, Frederick township. These men had been enlisted by John B. Adams, who was authorized to organize a regiment of infantry. Under the pressing exigencies of the public service. in the month of August, 1862, an order was issued by the Secretary of War to consolidate regiments in process of formation and forward them at once to Washington for assignment to brigades. In the execution of this order the men enlisted by Adams and Ellmaker were organized into the One Hundred and Nineteenth regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers. Under this arrangement Peter C. Ellmaker was commissioned colonel. This gave offense to Adams, who failed to report the men in camp at Zeiglersville. Hartranft found these fifty men, who represented that the officer recruiting them had abandoned them, and they expressed their desire to join the company of cavalry then forming. They were accepted, fifty in number, and about the middle of August, 1862, the full company of one hundred men assembled at Zeigiersville, and, after a royal breakfast, provided by the kind-hearted people of the village, the company took carriages, furnished by the farmers and business men of the neighborhood, and drove to Pottstown, where they took the cars for Harrisburg. The company officers upon leaving the county were as follows: First Lieutenant, R.B. Rhoads; Second Lieutenant, Joshua Houck. Upon arriving at the State capital the company was marched to Camp Curtin, commanded by Captain Tarbutton, where it drew camp equipage and provisions. The men passed the usual physical examinations and were then tested in horsemanship, and duly mustered into the service of the United States on the 17th day of September, 1862, to "serve for three years or during the war." Theodore W. Bean was appointed first sergeant of the company. Clothing was issued to the men, and the work of squad and company drill was about to commence, when an order was received from the commandant of the camp to muster the men in the company street. The order required the men whose names were called to step two paces to the front. All the Adams recruits were called. They were declared under arrest, and escorted by the provost guard of the capital to quarters in the city of Harrisburg, there to await the further orders of the Secretary of War.

The fact now became evident to the officers of the company that all the Zeiglersville recruits had been regularly mustered in under the order of Adams, and the rolls returned to the Secretary of War under the order to consolidate, and that therefore their men belonged of right to Colonel Elimaker's command. The manner in which these men were claimed was felt to be humiliating, and the officers and men remaining felt it due to themselves and those under arrest to investigate the facts, and, if possible, have them restored to the command. It is just to the great and good war-Governor Curtin and his Adjutant-General Russel to say that both offered every facility to fully investigate the facts and circumstances of the case. Theo. W. Bean was designated by the officers and men in camp and those detained to proceed to Washington to confer with the Secretary of War and Adjutant-General of the United States army. Governor Curtin and General Russel united in a strong appeal to the Secretary of War for the restoration of these men to the cavalry service, and the gentleman bearing the dispatches pressed the request of officers and men and the appeal of the State authorities in terms the most considerate his address could command. The matter was referred to Adjutant-General Thomas, U.S.A., who, in a personal interview, declined to change or modify their original muster-in roll, but at once relieved the men from the order of arrest, and directed them to be forwarded, under the command of a commissioned officer, to the regiment to which they originally belonged. Sergeant Bean returned from Washington and reported results to the men. They were promptly relieved from arrest, and accepted the situation without murmur or remonstrance. They were gallant and patriotic men, and their record in the noble regiment to which they subsequently been me attached is highly creditable to themselves and their country.



LIST OF MEN NOT ON MUSTER-ROLL, COMPANY L, SEVENTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.



Henry S. Acker, Jacob Antis, Joseph Auchy, Clem. Armbruster, Peter S. Boyer, Jonas Boyer, Henry Basler, Jacob Batzel, George Brosius, William Dearoff, John Faust, John Faust, Mahlon Herbert, Henry Herbst, John Jenkins, Harrison Johnson, Jacob Johnson, John Kohl, Milton Krause, Aug. Keyser, Abr. P. Koons, Edwd. Kepp, John P. Koons, Fred. P. Koons, Philip Kline, Saml. S. Leidig, Albert Leidig, H.S. Longaker, John Lord, Lewis D. Miller, Adam Moyer, John G. Miller, John Neiman, John Neiffer, Daniel Puhl, John Pool, William D. Quigg, Oliver Rushon, John Sloop, Henry Styer, Elias Smith, Franklin Shuler, John Schnenk, Samuel Schlottern, Jacob Smith, James Smith, Arnold Ulmer, Joseph Underkuffler, Aaron Wick, Christian Wick, Henry Wolff.

This separation and loss of men disorganized the original company, in consequence of which Lieutenants Rhoads and buck lost their positions, neither of whom accompanied the enlisted men to the One Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment. Captain Hartranft still had fifty men in camp, but under the altered circumstances could not be mustered. About this time Lieutenant John Rees, with fifty men from Chester County, reported to Captain Tarbutton; overtures were at once made for a consolidation of the two commands, and a new company organization was effected. The Chester County men were at once transferred to the quarters vacated by the Zeiglersville recruits, and an election of officers was immediately held, which resulted in the choice of the following gentlemen: Captain, David B. Hartranft; First Lieutenant, John Rees; Second Lieutenant, Theo. W. Bean. The non-commissioned officers were then appointed, and the work of dismounted drill and discipline began. By the latter end of September the quota for the three cavalry regiments was in camp, and the organization of twelve companies into the Seventeenth Regiment of cavalry was effected. Captain Hartranft was promoted first major; Lieutenant Rees succeeded to the captaincy; Second Lieutenant Theo. W. Bean was promoted to first lieutenant, and First Sergeant William H. Wright was commissioned second lieutenant; Edwin A. Bean, of Company L, was appointed regimental quartermaster-sergeant. The regimental organization was effected on the 2nd of October, and completed by the muster of its commanding officer, November 19, 1862. It immediately broke up its dismounted camp under Captain Tarbutton within the line of Camp Simmons, and established itself at Camp McClellan, about two miles north of Harrisburg, where the command received their horses, arms and equipments. A realizing sense of work and responsibility of the cavalry officer and soldier was perhaps here first experienced. The novelty was by no means worn away, nor had the men become accustomed to the care and management of their horses, when orders were received to report to the line of active service. Of the twelve companies voluntarily composing this regiment, A Company was from Beaver County, B from Susquehanna, C from Lancaster, D from Bradford, E from Lebanon, F from Cumberland, G from Franklin, H from Schuylkill, I from Perry, K from Luzerne, L from Montgomery and Chester and M from Wayne. The letters by which companies are denoted in cavalry regiments are not given until after the regimental organization is effected, - at least, such was the case in the late war among the volunteer troops entering the three years' service.

The reason for this is found in the order of assignment in the formation of squadrons and battalions. The twelve companies of a regiment of cavalry are formed into six squadrons of two companies each, and these six squadrons are consolidated into three battalions. As the right of each squadron and battalion is deemed the position of honor, it is sought after and is assigned by the commanding officer, first, with reference to seniority of captains, and second, with reference to fitness to command. As the company organizations are complete when the regiment is formed, there are at least four promotions from the captains of the line, viz.: lieutenant-colonel and three majors. The companies from which these captains are promoted are therefore junior, and must go to the left of their squadrons.

The field officers were taken in the organization of this regiment from the following companies: Lieutenant-Colonel McAllister, Perry County; First Major Hartranft, Montgomery County; Second Major Reinhold, first lieutenant, Lebanon County (this was exceptional because of the service he had previously experienced in the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry); Third Major Durland, Wayne County. The letters given are from A to M inclusive, the letter J not being used because of the similarity in its form to letter I, and therefore liable to be confused with it in time of confusion or battle. The reader will therefore perceive that letters are assigned to companies not only as a convenient manner of denoting them, but also to give them their relative position in line. While it is of manifest advantage to have the company represented in the field and staff formation, it is generally attended with a sacrifice of position on the line. The first six letters designate the right of squadrons, and the remaining six the left, as follows:

1st Battalion: 1st Squadron, A, G; 2nd Squadron, B, H.

2nd Battalion: 3d Squadron, C, I; 4th Squadron, D, K.

3d Battalion: 5th Squadromi, E, L; 6th Squadron, F, M.

LIST OF FIELD OFFICERS AND BREVETS.(21*)

Colonel James D. Anderson, Brevet Colonel Durland, Brevet Lieutenant, Colonel William Thompson, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Theodore W. Bean.

On the 25th of November the regiment moved to Washington, and was encamped for several days on East Capitol Hill, after which it was ordered to the front. On the 22nd of December it reached the town of Occoquan, where Hampton's Legion was encountered, and after a sharp skirmish, was driven and pursued for some distance across the Occoquan Creek. Here three companies, - C, D and I, - under Major Reinhold, were detained to picket the creek from Occoquan to Wolf Run Shoals. They were much harassed by roving parties of partisan rangers, and on the 25th and 26th the right of time line was attacked by a superior force, which was repulsed and some prisoners taken. On the 27th the detachment was ordered to rejoin the regiment, which had, in the mean time, advanced to near Stafford Court-House, and moved early; but when nearing Neabsco Creek word was brought that the enemy had attacked at Dumfries, and that a column of cavalry and artillery was moving on the Telegraph road to Occoquan. Major Reinhoid immediately countermarched, and taking position on the heights on the north bank, successfully foiled every attempt of the enemy to cross. On the following morning, having been reinforced by a detachment of the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, it crossed the stream to reconnoitre, and fell in with General Stuart's command, which immediately attacked. Being overpowered, it was obliged to retire, and recrossed the creek. On the 5th of January, 1863, it rejoined the regiment near Stafford CourtHouse. The Seventeenth was here assigned to the Second Brigade of the First Cavalry Division, where it was associated with the Sixth New York, Sixth United States and Eighth Pennsylvania, commanded by Colonel Thomas C. Devin, in which it served throughout its entire term. On the 18th of February Companies C and I, Captain Spera, were ordered to escort duty with General Meade, commanding the Fifth Corps, where they remained until after the battle of Chancellorsville, and during the engagement were kept busy in the transmission of orders.

Only three regiments of cavalry, of which the Seventeenth was one, moved with the columns of Hooker on the Chancellorsville campaign, the major part having been dispatched under Averell and Stoneman to cut the enemy's communications and harass his rear. When, on the evening of the 2nd of May, the enemy under Jackson had driven the entire Eleventh Corps, and was pushing on victorious to sever the Union army, and gain its only line of retreat, few troops were in position to stay his course. At this juncture General Pleasanton, who had been out in advance of the line on the centre, in support of General Sickles, then demonstrating upon Jackson's flank and rear, happened to be returning with the Eighth and Seventeenth Pennsylvania Regiments towards the centre, and had reached the breast-works just as hordes of Jackson's men, who were pursuing the routed. Eleventh Corps troops, were approaching that part of the field. Divining the condition of affairs by the evidences of rout, in the Union columns, Pleasanton ordered Major Keenan, of the Eighth to charge with all his force and with impetuosity, which he knew was an element of the major's nature, full upon the head of the rebel advancing column, though he knew that the execution of the order would involve the sacrifice of that gallant regiment. This he did in order that, by checking for a moment the rebel onslaught, he might gain time to bring his horse artillery into position, and thus interpose some more effectual barrier. "I immediately ran up," says General Pleasanton, "this battery of mine at a gallop, put it into position, ordered it unlimbered and doubleshotted with canister, and directed the men to aim at the ground-line of the parapet that the Eleventh Corps had thrown up, about two-hundred yards off. Our artillery, as a general rule, overshoots, and I ordered them to fire low, because the shot would ricochet. I then set to work with two squadrons of the remaining regiment (the Seventeenth Pennsylvania) to clear this field of fugitives, and to stop what cannon and ammunition we could, and put them in position; and I managed to get twenty-two guns loaded, double shotted, and aiming on this space in front of us for about a quarter or half a mile, when the whole woods appeared alive with large bodies of men. This was just at dusk. I was going to give the word 'fire.' I had ordered those pieces not to fire unless I gave the word, because I wanted the effect of an immense shock. There was an immense body of men, and I wanted the whole weight of the metal to check them. I was about to give the word 'fire,' when one of the soldiers at a piece said: 'General, that is our flag.' I said to one of my aids, 'Mr. Thompson, ride forward there at once, and let me know what flag that is.' He then went to within one hundred yards, and those people cried out: 'Come on, we are friends.' He then started to move on, when the whole line of woods blazed with musketry, and they immediately commenced leaping over this parapet, and charged on the guns; and at the same time I saw from eight to ten rebel battle-flags run up along the whole line. I immediately gave the order, 'fire,' and the fire actually swept the men away; and it seemed to blow those men in front clear over the parapet . . . . We had this fight between musketry and artillery there for nearly an hour. At one time they got within fifty yards of the guns. . . . There were two squadrons of the Seventeenth Pennsylvania Cavalry left. This remaining regiment I had was composed of raw men, new troops, and all I could do with them was to make a show. I had them formed in single line, with sabres drawn, with orders to charge in case the enemy came to the guns. They sat in rear of the guns, and I have no doubt that the rebels took them for the head of a heavy column, as the country sloped back behind them, and they could not see what was back of them."(22*) And thus was the mad onset of Stonewall Jackson's army checked by artillery, supported by a single line of raw cavalry. It was a trying position for the regiment, but the firm front presented saved the day, and enabled Hooker to reform his shattered columns, and once more present an unbroken line. Early in the evening Sickles' troops came up and took position in support of the guns, and the regiment was relieved. In a general order, issued immediately after the battle, General Pleasanton says: "The coolness displayed by the Seventeenth Pennsylvania Regiment in rallying fugitives and supporting the battMontgomerys (including Nartin's) which repulsed the enemy's attack under Jackson, on the evening of the 2nd instant, has excited the highest admiration."

Under Buford and Gregg, the cavalry, on the 9th of June, crossed the Rappahannock at Beverly and Kelly's Fords, and boldly attacked the enemy's cavalry, supported by his infantry. The battle raged during most of the day. At length, finding that the rebels were moving up an overpowering force, the Union cavalry retired. In this engagement the Seventeenth participated, and in the retreat was of the rear guard, where it was subjected to a heavy artillery fire. Two days after the battle the regiment was posted to picket the line of the river from Beverly Ford to Sulphur Springs, while the main body of the army was marching northward. It was not withdrawn until the 15th, when it rejoined the division. Early on the morning of the 21st it was formed in line half a mile west of Middleburg, and met the enemy, repulsing his attack, and driving him in the direction of Upperville. When arrived near the town it was ordered to charge the left flank of the foe, and in executing it was brought under a heavy fire of his artillery. He was finally driven in confusion.

As General Buford, who commanded the division, moved northward through Maryland and Pennsylvania, he was hailed with demonstration of rejoicing, and as he entered Gettysburg was saluted with shouts and patriotic songs. On the night of the 30th he encamped near the grounds of Pennsylvania College, and on the morning of the 1st of July moved out by the Cashtown road. At a distance of a mile and a half from town he met the enemy in force. Dispositions were immediately made to resist his further advance, and for four hours, and until the arrival of the First Corps, Buford held at bay a third of the entire rebel army. "Buford, with his four thousand cavalry," says General Pleasanton, "attacked Hill, and for four hours splendidly resisted his advance, until Reynolds and Howard were able to hurry to the field and give their assistance. To the intrepidity, courage and fidelity of General Buford and his brave division the country and the army owe the field of Gettysburg."(23*) As soon as the infantry in force had come lip, the cavalry moved upon its flanks, and during the remaining part of the battle was active in preventing the movement of flanking columns of the enemy and in protecting the lines of communication with the base of supply. Buford's division retired to Taneytown on the evening of the 2nd, Westminster on the 3d and Frederick on the 5th. On the 6th it encountered the enemy west of Boonsboro', and after a sharp fight drove him from his position. On the following morning he renewed the attack, but was again driven, the Seventeenth Pennsylvania and Ninth New York having a severe encounter while upon the skirmish line. Skirmishing continued daily until the enemy retired across the river, and the campaign Was at an end.

The fall campaign was one of great activity for the cavalry. The part taken by the Seventeenth is reflected by the following extract from Captain Theodore W. Bean's manual of the regiment: "At Raccoon Ford," he says, "you left your horses under shelter and rushed to the support of your brother comrades in arms (Fourth New York), who were gallantly struggling against fearful odds, and under a murderous fire of grape and canister from the enemy saved them from capture, re-established the line, and held it until relieved by the Twelfth Army Corps, for which you received the special commendation of the division commander. In the subsequent movements of the same year, when the wily rebel chief proposed to flank the army of the Potomac, and thus gain possession of the capital, history will accord to the regiment an honorable association with the commands that beat back his advance at Morton's Ford, Stevensburg, Brandy Station and Oak Hill, where, holding the extreme left of the line, you skilfully changed front as a distinctive organization, by direction of our immediate commander, anticipating a well-intended surprise, and repulsing, with heavy loss, a reckless charge of cavalry, for which the enemy at that time were notorious. In the counter-movements of the campaign, closing with the battles of Bealton Station and Rickseyville, the occupation of the line on the Rapidan, and the indecisive engagement at Mine Run, the regiment was present, bearing its share of the toils, and sustained its proportion of losses, and, with the command, went into winter-quarters on the battle-beaten plains of Culpepper."

The regiment was engaged during the winter in picket duty, holding a long line in the direction of James City. On the 27th of February, 1864, a detachment of two hundred men, under command of Captain Spera, was ordered to report to General Kilpatrick, who, with a force of five thousand cavalry, was about to start on a raid upon Richmond. The command moved on the following day, and at Beaver Dam Station, on the Virginia Central Railroad, the work of destruction was commenced. Here Hall's brigade, to which Spera's detachment belonged, was sent to operate on the Fredericksburg Railroad, and at Taylorsville met a superior force of the enemy, which it failed to dislodge; but near Yellow Tavern, on the Virginia Central, effected the destruction of rolling stock, and there rejoined the main column. Kilpatrick approached to within two or three miles of Richmond, carrying the outer works and throwing shells into the city, but found the forces opposing him too great to overcome, and retired by Meadow Bridge, where a sharp skirmish occurred. At New Kent Court-House the infantry of Butler was met, whence, some days later, the command returned by transports to Alexandria, and thence to its old, camp near Culpepper.

At time opening of the spring campaign the brigade moved to Chancellorsville, and on the 6th of May was sent to the Furnace, on the left of the line, where it met the enemy and fought dismounted, foiling numerous attempts of the rebels to turn that flank, being heavily engaged during the entire day. On the following morning it relieved Gregg's division on the Spottsylvania road, where the enemy was driven with heavy loss, and at night encamped at Todd's Tavern. On the 8th the fighting was renewed, in which the Seventeenth, holding the Spottsylvania road, suffered severely. Repeated charges of the enemy were repulsed and the position held until relieved by the Fifth Corps. On the 9th, Sheridan led the cavalry on his grand raid towards Richmond. At Beaver Dam Station many Union prisoners were rescued and large amounts of rebel stores were destroyed. At Yellow House serious fighting ensued, in which the Seventeenth, dismounted, was of the charging column, and drove the enemy. At night the regiment was put upon the picket line stretching out towards Richmond, reaching near to the rebel fortifications. Meadow Bridge, which had been destroyed, was repaired by the First Division, and in the face of the enemy, with infantry and artillery, on the opposite side, the Seventeenth took the lead in crossing and delivering a most determined charge, drove him from his works in confusion. While the battle was raging a severe thunder-storm set in, adding to the terror of the scene. Lieutenant Joseph E. Shultz was killed in the charge. He was shot through the heart, expiring almost instantly. Sheridan rejoined the Army of the Potomac near Chesterfield Station on the 25th.

Resting but for a day, the cavalry again moved forward, and crossing the Parnunky at New Castle Ferry, engaged the enemy, and after several charges drove him from his position. On the 28th two squadrons of the regiment were sent towards Hanover, encountering the enemy's skirmishers and driving them in, and on the 30th, while reaching out to open communication with the left of the army, brought on the battle of Bethesda Church. On the same day the regiment was engaged near Old Church Tavern, where Lieutenant John Anglun, regimental quartermaster, was killed, and Captain William Tice wounded. At Cold Harbor the regiment moved, dismounted, and in the charge there delivered held the left of the line. In its first advance it was repulsed and suffered severe loss, but renewing the charge, the enemy was routed and driven. He subsequently made repeated attempts to recapture his lost works, but was as often driven back with loss. At daylight of the 1st of June he made a desperate assault, determined upon victory. He was allowed to come within short range, when the artillery and repeating carbines were opened on him with terrible effect, the ground being covered with his slain. When relieved by the infantry, Sheridan led his cavalry in the direction of Lynchburg. On the 10th the regiment was sent to the Spottsylvania battleground, where, in a field hospital, thirty-five wounded Union soldiers were found in a famishing condition and brought away. On rejoining the column near Trevilian Station, Sheridan was found hotly engaged. The Seventeenth was immediately sent to the front, and during the 11th and the following day was hotly engaged, sustaining heavy losses. Finding the enemy in superior numbers, Sheridan returned. The Seventeenth was again engaged near White House Landing on the 21st, at Jones' Bridge on the 23d, and at Charles City Court-House on the 24th, in each engagement sustaining considerable losses. On the 26th, Sheridan crossed the James, but a month later returned to the left bank and moved up towards Richmond. At Ruffin's House the enemy's videttes were found and driven upon his infantry supports. On the morning of the 28th the brigade, dismounted, was sent to dislodge the enemy's infantry from a strong position on commanding ground in front of Ruffin's. Difficult ditches had to be crossed, but pushing resolutely forward, it opened fire from the repeating carbines, and though losing heavily, drove him out and occupied his ground. On the following day Sheridan recrossed the James, and soon after retraced his steps for the purpose of misleading the enemy as to his real strength on the Richmond side. On the 30th he returned to the lines before Petersburg.

Early in August, Sheridan was ordered to the command of the army in the Shenandoah Valley, and two divisions of cavalry, the First and Third, were sent to his aid. Upon the arrival of the Seventeenth in the valley, Major Reinhold resigned and was honorably discharged, whereupon Captain Weidner H. Spera was promoted to succeed him. On the 11th of August the cavalry moved towards Newtown, driving the enemy, but at six in the evening found him in position, determined to dispute further advance. The Seventeenth was at the front and was immediately ordered to charge. The enemy offered obstinate resistance, but was finally dislodged and retreated rapidly up the valley. On the 16th the enemy attacked the pickets of the brigade near Front Royal, the Seventeenth holding the centre of the brigade line. The division was immediately put in motion and repulsed the over-confident foe, capturing two battle-flags and three hundred prisoners. General Devin, commanding the brigade, was wounded in this engagement. On the 25th the command moved forward to Kearnysville, where it came upon the enemy's infantry. Of the battle which ensued, General Sheridan says: "This attack was handsomely made, but instead of finding cavalry his (enemy's) infantry was encountered, and for a time doubled up and thrown into the utmost confusion . . . . This engagement was a mutual surprise, our cavalry expecting to meet the enemy's cavalry, and his infantry expecting no opposition whatever." The Union forces retired in the direction of Shepherdstown, and when near that place the enemy attacked Custer's division. For the purpose of diverting attention from Custer the Seventeenth was ordered to charge upon the enemy's flank. In column of fours it dashed down a narrow road, and drove a body of his infantry from a wood, creating consternation in his ranks. In this charge Lieutenant James Potter was killed. For three weeks almost constant skirmishing was kept up, the Seventeenth participating in the actions at Smithfield on the 29th, at White Post on the 1st of September, at the Berryville and Buncetown crossing of the Opequan on the 7th, in which Captain Martin R. Reinhold was killed, and at Bunker Hill on the 13th.

Sheridan was now about to assume the offensive. At noon of the 18th the cavalry at Bunker Hill was ordered to break camp and move quietly without sound of bugle, and at a mile east of Summit Point encamped for the night, drawing sixty rounds of ammunition per man and sending all regimental baggage and supply trains to Harper's Ferry. At one o'clock on the morning of the 19th reveille was sounded, and at two the cavalry moved towards the Opequan. Before daylight heavy firing was heard. The First Division moved on the road towards Stevenson Station, crossing the Opequan, and driving the enemy from his position at the ford. The fighting was now general along the entire line, Sheridan having moved to the attack with his entire army. Step by step the ground was disputed. When within half a mile of the Valley pike, near the station, the enemy was discovered massing his cavalry to dispute the advance of Averell. At this junction General Devin was ordered to charge with his brigade. With the Seventeenth in advance, the charge was made, and the enemy driven in great confusion towards Winchester, opening the way for a junction of Torber's and Averell's commands. Moving in line up the pike towards Winchester, the enemny's line was again charged and driven from its position. The fighting was very severe. General Sheridan says, in his report:

"I attacked the forces of General Early over the Berryville pike, at the crossing of the Opequan Creek, and after a most desperate engagement, which lasted from early in the morning until five o'clock in the evening, completely defeated him, driving him through Winchester and capturing about two thousand five hundred prisoners, five pieces of artillery, nine battle-flags and most of their wounded."


After the battle the regiment was ordered to report for duty to Colonel Edwards, post commander at Winchester, and was employed in guarding against the attacks of guerillas and in keeping open communication with the base of supplies. On the 15th of October, Major Spera was sent with a detachment to Martinsburg, and while there was ordered to escort General Sheridan to the front, and was with him in that ride rendered famous by the stanzas of T. Buchanan Read, taking part in the great battle which completely crushed the enemy in the valley, and returned to Winchester with dispatches on the 20th. Until the 27th the regiment remained on duty at Winchester, when it was relieved and rejoined the division. On the 19th of December, General Torbert led his command by Front Royal into the valley of Virginia, and on the 22nd met the enemy at White's Ford, driving him, and again on the following day near Gordonsville, where, finding his infantry in heavy force, Torbert was obliged to fall back. The Seventeenth was of the rear guard in the retreat, and successfully held the enemy in check, who made repeated attacks. In repelling one of these, Lieutenant Alfred F. Lee was killed. Returning to the vicinity of Winchester, the regiment went into permanent quarters, and during the winter was employed in picket and scout duty, detachments being occasionally sent out against roving bands of the enemy. On the 27th of December, Colonel Kellogg was honorably discharged amid Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson promoted to succeed him, Major Durland being promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and Captains Luther B. Kurtz and William Thompson to majors. On the 31st of December the Second Brigade was sent to Lovettsville, in the Loudon Valley, for the protection of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and for guarding the citizens against lawless bands that were constantly committing depredations.

On the 24th of February, 1865, Sheridan led the cavalry in a grand raid upon the James River Canal and other rebel communications in rear of Richmond. At Staunton the head of the column began skirmishing with the enemy. On the 6th of March the command reached Scottsville, and the work of destruction commenced. Locks were blown up, and mills and rebel stores were destroyed. The First and Second Brigades went to Howardsville, cutting and demolishing the canal and destroying supplies destined for the rebel army. On the 8th the Second Brigade marched via Howardsville, Scottsville and Fluvanno Court-House to Columbia and thence to Goochland Court-House, returning during the night to Columbia, continuing the work of destruction. From the James River the command moved upon the Virginia Central Railroad, which was likewise rendered unserviceable, and on the 26th rejoined the army before Petersburg. "There perhaps never was a march," says Sheridan, "where nature offered such impediments and showed herself in such gloom as upon this; incessant rain, deep almd almost impassable streams, swamps and mud were encountered and overcome with a cheerfulness on the part of the troops that was truly admirable. . . . To every officer and man of the First and Third Cavalry Divisions I return my sincere thanks for patriotic, unmurmuring and soldierly conduct."

Sheridan reached the army just as it was moving on its last campaign, and he at once took the van. At Stony Creek the cavalry became engaged, and the Second Brigade was hastened forward to the support of Davie's division, which was forced back, the Seventeenth losing a number wounded and missing in the engagement. At daylight of the 1st of April fighting was renewed, the Union lines charging the enemy in his works, the division capturing six hundred prisoners and two battle-flags. The loss in the Seventeenth was severe, Captain James Ham being among the killed, and Captains English, Donehoo, Reinhold and Lieutenant Anglun among the wounded. Rapid marching and hard fighting continued until the 6th, when General Ewell, with one wing of the rebel army, was captured. From that point the cavalry kept up a running fight with the enemy's advance until he reached Appomattox Court-House, where the whole rebel army was forced to lay down its arms. In securing this joyful result the cavalry, led by Sheridan, contributed largely, the Seventeenth sustaining its hard-earned reputation for gallantry to the last.

From the Appomattox the regiment returned to Petersburg, and after a week's rest marched to the neighborhood of Washington, where it remained in camp until its final muster out of service, on the 16th of June. A detachment of this regiment was consolidated with parts of the First and Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiments, forming the Second Provisional Cavalry, and remained in service until the 7th of August, when it was mustered out at Louisville, Ky. In his farewell order to the Seventeenth, General Devine says: In five successive campaigns, and in over threescore engagements, you have nobly sustained your part. Of the many gallant regiments from your State, none has a brighter record, none has more freely shed its blood on every battle-field from Gettysburg to Appomattox. Your gallant deeds will be ever fresh in the memory of your comrades of the Iron Brigade and the First Division. Soldiers, farewell !"

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

Josiah H. Kellogg, col., mustered in Nov. 19, 1862; res. Dec. 27, 1864.

James Q. Anderson, col., mustered in Sept. 6, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. A to maj. June 13, 1863; to lieutenant-col. April 30, 1864; to col. Jan 23, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

John B. McAllister, lieutenant-col., mustered in Oct. 7, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. I Nov. 6, 1862; res. May 31, 1863.

Coe Burland, lieutenant-col., mustered in Oct. 23, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. M to maj. Nov. 20, 1862; to lieutenant-col. Feb. 13, 1865; brevet col. March 13, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

David B. Hartranft, maj., mustered in Oct. 14, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. L Nov. 20, 1862; res. Jan. 11, 1863.

Reuben R. Reinhold, maj., mustered in Oct. 2, 1862; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. E Oct. 22, 1862; res. Aug. 9, 1864.

Weidner H. Spera, maj., mustered in Oct. 14, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. C Aug. 10, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Luther B. Kurtz, maj., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. C Feb. 13, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

William Thompson, maj., mustered in Nov. 1, 1862; promoted from capt. Co. H Feb. 13, 1865; brevet lieutenant-col. March 13, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Perry J. Tate, adjt., mustered in Sept. 23, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. Co. E Nov. 20, 1862; res. May 31, 1863.

James A. Clark, adjt., mustered in Sept. 21, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. C o. K Nov. 6, 1863; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

John Anglum, quartermaster, mustered in Oct. 2, 1862; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. K Nov. 2l, 1862; killed at Old Church Tavern, Va., May 30, 1864.

Edwin A. Bean, quartermaster, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. L July 22, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Henry M. Donehoo, com. sergt., mustered in Sept. 6, 1862; promoted from private Co. A Nov. 19, 1862; to capt. Co. B Dec. 29, 1862.

John P. Ross, com. sergt., mustered in Sept. 6, 1862; promoted from com. sergt. Co. A to com. sergt. Nov. 1, 1862; to com., sub. May 26, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Isaac Walborn, surgeon, mustered in Jan 10, 1863; res. Sept. 28, 1863.

Thad. S. Gardner, surgeon, mustered in Aug. 2, 1862; promoted from assist. surgeon 62nd Regiment P.V. Oct. 23, 1863; res. April 6, 1864.

George B. Pomeroy, surgeon, mustered in April 8, 1863; promoted from assist. surgeon

110th Regiment P.V. May 2, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 28, 1865.

Jas. B. Moore, assist. surgeon, mustered in Oct. 23, 1862; res. July 18, 1863.

J. Wilson Dewitt, assist. surgeon, mustered in April 10, 1863; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Henry A. Wheeler, chaplain, mustered in Nov. 21, 1862; res. March 8, 1863.

Robert S. Morton, chaplain, mustered in March 24, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Samuel M. Drew, vet. surgeon, mustered in June 4, 1863; discharged Aug. 7th, to date Jan. 16, 1865.

Jerome I. Stanton, sergt. -maj., mustered in Sept. 21, 1862; promoted from 1st

sergt. Co. B June 10, 1865; must. out with regiment June 16, 1865.

Isaac N. Grubb, sergt.-maj., mustered in Sept. 26, 1862; promoted from corp.

Co. I Aug. 23, 1863 to 1st lieutenant Co. I July 22, 1864.

Stanley N. Mitchell, sergt.-maj., mustered in Sept. 21, 1862; promoted from private Co. B Aug. 1, 1864; to 2nd lieutenant Co. D Dec. 28, 1864.

James Brannon, sergt.-maj., mustered in Sept. 22, 1862; promoted from private Co. M July 21, 1864; to 2nd lieutenant Co. N June 10, 1865.

George S. Drexier, sergt.-maj., mustered in Sept. 26, 1862; promoted front quartermastersergt. Co. I Nov. 1, 1862; transferred to Co. I Aug. 25, 1864.

Thomas H. Boyd. quartermaster-sergt.. mustered in Oct. 6, 1864; promoted from private Co. I Jan. 1, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

John A. English, com. sergt., mustered in Sept. 6, 1862; promoted from private Co. A May 26, 1863; must. out with regiment June 10, 1865.

Henry J. Tarble, hosp. steward, mustered in Sept. 22, 1862; promoted from private Co. N Oct. 4, 1863; must. out with regiment June 16, 1865.

Peter F. Clark, hosp. steward, mustered in Sept. 21, 1862; promoted from private Co. K March 1, 1864; must. out with regiment June 16, 1865.

John N. Furman, hosp. steward, mustered in Oct. 3, 1862; promoted from private Co. D Nov. 20, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. April 11, 1863.

James N. Smith, hosp. steward, mustered in Sept. 21, 1862; promoted from

private Co. B April 9, 1863; discharged on surgeon certif., date unknown.

Thomas Lawrence, saddler, mustered in Sept. 30, 1862; promoted from private Co. K April 6, 1863; must. out with regiment June 16, 1865.

William C. Walker, saddler, mustered in Oct. 3, 1862; promoted from private Co. M Nov. 1, 1862; transferred to Co. N April 6, 1863.

James Hyde, chief bugler, mustered in Feb. 28, 1864; promoted from bugler Co. B Nov. 1, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 21, 1865.

Jonathan M. Darrow, farrier, mustered in Sept. 21, 1862; promoted from private Co. B Nov. 1, 1862; transferred to Co. B May, 15, 1863.


COMPANY L.

David B. Hartranft, capt., mustered in Oct. 14, 1862; promoted to maj. Nov. 20, 1862.

John L. Rees, capt., mustered in Sept. 27, 1862; promoted from 1st lieutenant Nov. 20, 1862; res. May 29, 1863.

Theodore W. Bean, capt., mustered in Oct. 17, 1862; promoted from 2nd to 1st lieutenant Nov. 21, 1862; to capt. Nov. 1, 1863; brevet maj. and lieutenant col. March 13, 1865; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

William H. Wright, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. to 2nd lieutenant Nov. 21, 1862; to 1st lieutenant Aug. 8, 1864; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Thomas J. Owen, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Sept. l7, 1862; promoted from sergt. Nov. 1, 1863; discharged by G.O. June 20, 1865.

Ellis P. Newlin, 1st sergt., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged by G.O. June 19, 1865.

John M. Bean, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Thomas H. Humphrey, com. sergt., mustered in Sept. 23, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

John T. Johnson, sergt., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; promoted to sergt. Oct. 30, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Joseph C. Jones, sergt., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; promoted from Corp. Nov. 1, 1863; must. out with company June 16, 1863.

Henry C. Yerkes, sergt., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; promoted to sergt. Dec. 10, 1863; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

William Wright, sergt., mustered in Sept. 23, 1862; promoted to sergt., date unknown; must. out with company June 16, 1863.

George Ferree, sergt., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862, promoted from corp. May 15, 1865; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Lewis B. Bailey, sergt., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged by G.O. May 15, 1865.

William Hunsicker, sergt., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 1, 1864.

Henry G. Hunter, sergt., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; discharged on surgeon Certif. Oct. 1, 1864.

Edwin A. Bean, sergt., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; promoted to quartermaster July 22, 1864.

Enos P. Jeffries, sergt., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; com. 2nd lieutenant Co. F July 16, 1864; not mustered; discharged by G.O. June 21, 1865.

Charles J. Keeler, corp., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; prisoner from Sept. 22, 1863, to Feb. 28, 1865; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Gideon Saylor, corp., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; promoted to corp., date unknown; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Robert Gill, corp., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; promoted to corp., date unknown must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Josiah Tyson, corp., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; promoted to corp. Nov. 1. 1863 must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Mahlon Kline, corp., mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; promoted to corp. Dec. 10, 1863 must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Ezekiel Fogel, corp., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; promoted to corp. March 1, 1863 must. out with company June 16, 1865.

James N. Kennedy, corp., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; promoted to Corp. date unknown; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Daniel Farner, corp., mustered in Sept. 23, 1862; promoted to corp. May 13, 1865 must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Preston Shoemaker, corp., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 28, 1863.

John G. Tyson, Corp., mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; captured Sept. 6, 1864; died at Salisbury N.C., Feb. 22, 1862; burial record Jan. 31, 1863.

John A. Ross, bugler, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Franklin A. Savage, bugler, mustered in Oct. 6, 1862 must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Andrew Irwin, blacksmith, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Samuel Linsenbigler, saddler, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Privates.

Joseph Aiken, mustered in Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.  

Henry S. Acker, mustered in Sept 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Jacob Antis, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Joseph Auchey, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Clem. Armbruester, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Daniel Bungey, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Franklin Booth, mustered in Aug. 28, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1863.

Reuben Bender, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; discharged for wounds, with loss of arm, received at Cold Harbor, Va., May 31, 1864.

Harrison Barringer, mustered in Oct. 25, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment promoted Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

Daniel Bordman, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Peter S. Boyer, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Jonas Boyer, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Henry Basler, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Jacob Batzel, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

George Brosius, mustered in Sept. 8, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

Jacob Carl, mustered in Sept. 9, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

W.M. Cunningham, mustered in Aug. 8, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

John Clare, mustered in Oct. 25, 1864.

John Cooper, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862.

William Cooper, mustered in Oct. 13, 1862.

William M. Davis, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, l865.

Eli Dyson, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Henry Dotts, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1863.

Ellis B. Davis, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; died at Washington, D.C., Nov. 1, 1863; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery.

William Dearolf, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Henry Erb, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

William Erb, mustered in Sept. 23, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Amos Ecoff, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Beneville Eck, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; captured; died at Salisbury, N.C., Feb. 22, 1865; burial record Jan. 14, 1865.

Jacob Fox, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Frederick Ferree, mustered in Sept. 1, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1863.

Patrick Ford, mustered in Oct. 10, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment promoted Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

John Faust, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John Freese, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

William Gayley, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged for wounds received at Cold Harbor, Va., May 31, 1864.

Samuel Garvis, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Nov., 1863.

James C. Grattan, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment promoted Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

Leopold Gastinger, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Aaron Flood, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., May 31, l864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Joshua Hauck, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; discharged, date unknown.

P.J. Hummelbaugh, mustered in Oct. 14, 1864; absent at muster out.

Benjamin Hosler, mustered in Oct. 25, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment promoted Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

Mahlon Herbst, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Henry Herbst, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John R. Heard, mustered in Sept. 19, 1864; discharged by G.O. May 23, 1865.

William Irwin, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Joseph Irwin, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged, date unknown.

Erastus F. Johnson, mustered in Oct. 6, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

John Jenkins, mustered in Oct. 13, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Harrison Johnson, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Jacob Johnson, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Jacob Kook, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Israel Kolb, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Edward Keegan, mustered in Sept. 26, 1862; wounded at Trevillan Station, Va., June 12, 1864; prisoner from June 12 to Sept. 24, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Jefferson Kennedy, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

William H. Kepler, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Jacob Kline, mustered in Sept. 9, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Charles Keller.

John Kohl, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862: not on muster-out roll.

Milton Krause, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Augustus Keyser, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Abraham P. Koons, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Edward Kepp, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John P. Koons, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Frederick P. Koons, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Philip Kline, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John C. Lutz, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Oct. 20, 1863.

James L. Lowery, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May, 1864; transferred to V.R.C.; discharged by G.O. July 26, 1865.

John E. Lynch, mustered in April 15, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment promoted Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

Henry Loftus, mustered in Oct. 7, 1864; discharged by G.O. Aug. 10, 1865.

Samuel S. Leidig, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Albert Leidig, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

H.S. Longaker, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John Lord, mustered in Sept. 19, 1864; not on muster-out roll.

Enos F. Mack, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

William Miller, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Samuel Miller, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

David R. Martin, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Benjamin H. Markley, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; discharged by G.O. May 23, 1865.

James F. Moore, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged, date unknown.

Henry March, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; died at Washington, D.C., date unknown.

Lewis D. Miller, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Adam Moyer, mustered in Sept. 16, 1882; not on muster-out roll.

John O. Miller, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Samuel McDonald, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Joseph McGinnis, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862.

John Neiman, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John Neiffer, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John O'Neal, mustered in Oct 13, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Edwin L. Ourn, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; transferred to V.R.C.; discharged by G.O. July 5, 1865.

Joseph Plank, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Wilson P. Powell, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Wilson P. Pine, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged by G.O., July 28, 1865.

William C. Park, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; transferred to 69th Co., 2nd Batt., V. R.C.; discharged by G.O., June 16, 1865.

Daniel Puhl, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John Pool, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

William D. Quigg, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Jeremiah Royer, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Samuel Ramsey, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Albert Roberts, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged by G.O. June 10, 1865.

William Richardson, mustered in Oct. 13, 1862; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment promoted Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

Charles Rhoades, mustered in Sept 17, 1862; died, date unknown.

Oliver Rushon, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Henry Sassaman, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Theophilus Steltz, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Albert Schanely, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Jacob Schanely, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Jefferson Schanely, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

George H. Smith, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Thomas Smith, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

George W. Smith, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Nicholas Smith, mustered in Sept. 9, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

William Savage, Sr., mustered in Aug. 8, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

John L. Savage, mustered in Aug. 8, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Henry Souders, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 1, 1865.

William Souders, mustered in Aug. 25, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Charles Simmes, mustered in March 8, 1864; absent at must. out.

James Sherwood, mustered in March 8, 1864; absent at must. out.

Patrick Skiffington, mustered in Oct. 10, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment Prov. Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

William Savage, Jr., mustered in Sept. 18, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment Prov Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

John Sloop, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Henry Styer, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Elias Smith, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Franklin Schuler, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John Schwenk, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Samuel Schlotterer, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Jacob Smith, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

James Smith, mustered in Oct. 13, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Joseph Taggert, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

William H. Thomas, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

David P. Tyson. mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Benjamin Thomas, mustered in Oct. 12, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment promoted Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

Arnold Ulmer, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Joseph Underkoffer, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

William R. Westler, mustered in Sept. 17, 1862; must. out with company June 16, l865.

James L. Witherow, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

William C. White, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

John Wildsmith, mustered in Sept. 19, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Peter Wentz, mustered in Sept. 2, 1864; must. out with company June 16, 1865.

Alexander West, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; discharged, date unknown.

Abner W. Williams, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; wounded at White House, Va., June 21, 1864; transferred to 119th Co., 2nd Batt., V.R.C.; discharged by G.O. Sept. 25, 1865.

Joseph Whittington, mustered in March 5, 1864; must. out with Co. B, 2nd Regiment promoted Cav., Aug. 7, 1865.

Aaron Wick, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Henry Wolf, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

Christian Wick, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

John Yohn, mustered in Oct. 13, 1862; discharged, date unknown.

William Yokum, mustered in Oct. 13, 1862.

Martin Zindel, mustered in Sept. 25, 1862; not on muster-out roll.

NOTE. - The following incident is vouched for by the editor, the facts having come to his knowledge since being mustered out of the service: During the winter of 1862 -63, and while the regiment was encamped at and near Acquia Church, in Stafford County, Va., the commanding officer was required to keep the communication open to Dumfries, where was posted a regiment of infantry, it being an intermediate post between the line in defense of the capital and the Army of the Potomac. The interval was frequently visited by Confederates in small numbers, such as light scouting-parties of fifty and sometimes in greater numbers. At first a battalion was used, and they would leave camp every night about half-past eleven, marching through to Dumfries, distance twelve miles, via the old Telegraph road, starting on the return about daylight. This routine was kept up for about a month, with only some slight skirmishes and bushwacking to enliven these dull and monotonous rides, and it was concluded that a squadron would do just as well as the battalion. The squadron was used for some weeks, when the number was reduced to a company, and nothing of a serious character occurring, the number was finally reduced to twelve men and a corporal, all under the care of a sergeant. During the month of March, 1863, on one occasion Sergeant Harry G. Hunter, of Company L, with the usual squad of twelve men, had reached Dumfries, reported to the officer, and at the break of day started on his return. When about midway between the outposts the sergeant passed through a dense woods, thence out into an open space. Just as the sergeant reached the clearing he observed a small party of horsemen some two hundred yards distant emerging from the woods through which the road ran, and approaching from the opposite direction. The sergeant was leading the party; the morning was cold and the road extremely muddy. The men rode by twos. Presently discovering that the approaching troops were clad in gray and evidently enemies, but without a hostile flag, he rode on. When within a few yards of each other, both being about equal in number, neither drew a sabre or raised a pistol, but coming still closer, the sergeant yielded half the road, the Confederates yielded the other half, the officers saluted each other, and the columns passed without a word of comment or hostility. Sergeant Hunter made the customary report at headquarters and the episode was kept a profound secret until the war closed, when the joke was related as a part of the unwritten history of the regiment. Sergeant Hunter is now principal of the High School, Birdsboro, Berks Co., Pa.



One Hundred and Seventy-Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Drafted Militia (nine months' men).

175th Regiment Pennsylvania Drafted Militia - This regiment was composed of eight companies from Chester and two from Montgomery County. The camp of rendezvous was in West Philadelphia, where the companies assembled in November, 1862, and a regimental organization was effected with the following field officers: Samuel A. Dyer, of Delaware County, colonel; Francis C. Hooton, of Chester County, lieutenant-colonel; Isaac McClure, of Chester County, major. On the 1st of December the regiment broke camp and moved via Washington to Fortress Monroe, and thence to Suffolk, Va., where it was made a part of the brigade commanded by Colonel Alfred Gibbs. After a month's incessant drill the regiment was transferred to the brigade of General F.B. Spinola, and moved, with other troops, during the closing days of the year, to Newbern, N.C., and went into winter-quarters. Spinola's brigade here became the First of the Fifth Division (General Henry Prince), Eighteenth Corps, (General Foster).

In March, 1863, when the enemy was threatening Newbern, the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth threw up a strong line of earth-works on the south side of the river Trent and joined in repelling the attack which was sluggishly made on the town. It also made several expeditions in search of Colonel Woodford's guerrillas, but never succeeded in inducing them to risk a fight. After retiring from Newbern the enemy proceeded to Washington, on the Tar River, and laid siege to the town. The defense was directed by General Foster in person, the little garrison consisting of ohly about two thousand men. From Newbern to Washington direct was about thirty miles, but by water one hundred and twenty. Prince's division at once moved by water to the relief of Foster. Eight miles below the town Prince found his way impeded by obstructions in the river, here a mile wide, and by heavy guns in earth-works on either side.

A year before, when Burnside made his descent upon this coast, the enemy had driven three lines of piles across the stream and erected heavy bomb-proofs to command the passage. When the Union forces got possession they contented themselves with opening a narrow way through the piles and left the bomb-proofs unharmed. When the enemy came again he had but to occupy. An attempt was made by the gunboats to reduce these defenses, but, failing in this, the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth was put upon a transport, in tow of the gunboat "Whitehead," and, with other troops, moved up to run past the obstructions; but, before reaching them, it was signaled to retire.

Prince subsequently abandoned further attempts at relief and returned to Newbern. A force under General Spinola, of which the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth formed part, which moved overland with the same object, was alike unsuccessful, meeting the enemy in force at Blount's Creek. The enemy, finding all attempts to reduce the place fruitless, and seeing a heavy force under Foster, who had escaped from the besieged town, gathering for a descent upon his rear, raised the siege. Spinola's brigade was then ordered to Washington, and a part of the One hundred and Seventy-fifth, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hooton, was posted at Fort Hill, and the other, under Major Smith, Major McClure having previously resigned, at an earth-work at Rodiman's Point, Colonel Dyer having been assigned to a temporary command in Little Washington, under General Prince. The regiment remained in this position for two months, and this being a malarious district, it lost many men by sickness, among them Lieutenants Evan Sheeler and John E. Miller. Near the close of June the regiment was ordered north, and upon its arrival at Fortress Monroe was designated to join in the force then organizing for a movement up the Peninsula. This order was, however, countermanded, and it was sent to the Upper Potomac to aid in intercepting the retreat of the rebel army from Pennsylvania. Upon its arrival at Harper's Ferry it was stationed on Maryland Heights, whence, after some delay and the final escape of Lee, it proceeded to Frederick, Md. It subsequently marched to Sandy Hook, where it was attached to Colonel Wells' brigade, of the Eighth Corps. With it the regiment assisted in laying a pontoon bridge over the Potomac to the town of Harper's Ferry, and, crossing, had a brisk skirmish with the Twelfth Virginia Cavalry, which was driven and the town occupied. Its term of service had now expired, and, returning to Philadelphia, it was, on the 7th of August, mustered out.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

(There are no muster-out rolls of this regiment on file in the adjutant general's office).

Samuel A. Dyer, col., mustered in May 3, 1861; promoted from capt. Co. C, 30th Regiment P.V., to lieutenant-col. Nov. 13, 1862; to col. Nov. 2, 1862; discharged Aug. 7, 1863.

Francis C. Hooton, lieutenant-col., mustered in Nov. 25, 1862; must. out with regiment Aug. 7, 1863.

Isaac McClure, maj., mustered in Dec. 6, 1862; res. Feb. 24, 1863.

Joseph P. Smith, majt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; pro, from capt. Co. A Feb. 24, 1863; must. out with regiment Aug. 7, 1863.

James T. Temple, adjt., mustered in Nov. 16, 1862; discharged Jan. 8, 1863.

J. Keen Vaughan, adjt., mustered in May 31, 1861; promoted from 1st sergt.Co. C, 30th Regiment P.V., Jan. 16, 1863; must. out with regiment Aug. 7, 1863.

Jesse M. Beam, quartermaster, mustered in Nov. 25, 1862; res. Jan. 9, 1863.

Herman B. Linton, surgeon, mustered in Nov. 13, 1862; res. Jan. 13, 1833.

Jeremiah B. Brandt, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 16, 1862; promoted from asst. surgeon 55th Regiment P.V. Jan. 31, 1863; must. out with regiment Aug. 7, 1863.

John F. Evans, asst. surgeon, mustered in Nov. 25, 1862; must. out with regiment Aug. 7, 1863.

Thomas H. Phillips, asst. surgeon, mustered in June 1, 1863; must. out with regiment Aug. 7, 1863.

A. Judson Rowland, chaplain, mustered in Nov. 26, 1862; must. out with regiment Aug. 7, 1863.

John F. Roberts, sergt.-maj., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862 promoted from private Co. C Nov. 22, 1862; not accounted for.

David Potts, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Nov. 10, 1862; promoted from private Co. K, date unknown; not accounted for.

J. Seydon Worrall, com. sergt., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; promoted from private Co. F, date unknown; not accounted for.

Louis R. Brown, hosp. steward, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862; promoted from private Co. K, date unknown; not accounted for.


COMPANY A.

Joseph D. Smith, capt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; promoted to maj. Feb. 24, 1863.

Lewis Ramsey, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company Aug. 7, 1863.

Henry C. Hughes, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged discharged 16, 1863.

John Graham, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; promoted to 2nd lieutenant Jan. 31, 1863; must. out with company Aug. 7, 1863.

Jonas F. Gibson, sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

B.F. Mack, sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Thomas C. Vansant, sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Josiah Saylor, sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Richard Raysor, corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Edwards, Corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Nathan Comley, corp., mustered in Nov. 4,4862; died at Washington, N.C., June 1, 1863; buried in National Cemetery, Newbern, plot 7, grave 131.

Amos F. Shantz, corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Samuel Marrias, corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Philip S. Reed, corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Theodore Kram, corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Privates.

George Alexander, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Mahlon Atkinson, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

George Arp, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862: not accounted for.

Daniel Burgess, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Benjamin Blatt, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Allen D. Bickings, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John Brown, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Lewis F. Bickings, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John W. Butcher, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John Camburn, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

William Carney, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Isaac Davis, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Jacob Dotts, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

James Deeds, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John Dine, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John Eastburn, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Jones Eastwood, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John Edwards, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Samuel Edwards, Sr., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

William Evertz, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Samuel Edwards, Jr., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

F. William Force, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Thomas Glass, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Samuel Greacy, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Joseph Gravel, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Milton Godshalk, mustered in Nov. 4, 1852; not accounted for.

John Hart, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

William Kenny, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Benjamin H. Love, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

James F. Millegan, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

William Miller, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Thomas McGraw, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

William McIntire, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

William McClure, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Frank Newberger, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John Perch, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

James Quirk, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Washington Quig, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John Reed. mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

M.T. Rice, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John L. Smith, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Thomas Snyder, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John Stump, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Summers, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Mahlon Schleeter, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

William Story, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Samuel Stout, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

Lafayette Willhour, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

John W. Wallace, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.

William Warton, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; not accounted for.


COMPANY H.

Thomas C. Steel, capt., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; must. out with company Aug. 7, 1863.

Valentine B. Emery, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; must. out with company Aug. 7, 1863.

Samuel M. Plush, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; must. out with company Aug. 7, 1863.

Davis R. Hendrix, 1st sergt., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Daniel H. Heffner, sergt., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Hiram Wildemuth, sergt., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Jacob Klink. sergt., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

William H. Saybold, sergt., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Franklin Van Horn, corp., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Ephraim G. Wentzel, corp., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Eshback, corp., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862: not accounted for.

John Klink, corp., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Valentine Hartenstine, corp., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Charles Briser, corp., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry F. Miller, Corp., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Isaac Diffenderfer, corp., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry R. Wentzel, mus., mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Privates.

William S. Bishop, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

James H. Bender, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

John Bowman, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

James F. Brooke, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Fredrick Brandt, mustered in Nov, 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 23, 1862.

Charles Benoit, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

John Collins, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

William Conoway, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

James F. Delliker, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 23, 1862.

John Dickson, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

William M. Engle, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Foust, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

David Frederick, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 24, 1862.

Jacob Fisher, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Gresh, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry G. Gilbert, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

David Grow, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Ephraim M. Gehris, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Josiah Gilbert, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 24, 1862.

Abraham Guyer, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Charles Hipple, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Peter Harterstine, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

William S. Huber, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

John Hause, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Enos Hunsberger, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Samuel Hillman, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 27, 1862.

Daniel Hess, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 24, 1862.

Jonas Hunsberger, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 24, 1862.

Henry Jacobs, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 25, 1862.

James Johnston, mustered in Nov. 6, 1662; not accounted for.

William Jones, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Peter Kulp, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Kepler, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 25, 1862.

Elias Koch, mustered in Nov. 7, 1862; discharged Nov. 25, 1862.

Charles Kramer, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 27, 1862.

Daniel R. Kepler, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged April, 1863.

Franklin B. Kline, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

David S. Latshaw, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Adam Levengood, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Josiah Longabaugh, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Isaac Longacker, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 25, 1862.

Daniel Miller, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Jacob H. Moser, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

James Magill, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Joseph McNamee, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

James McGowan, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Nagle, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Milton Nagle, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

John Reninger, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Reigner, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Charles Reed, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 26, 1862.

Levi J.B. Reninger, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Stettler, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

John Stettler, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Jesse Shanely, mustered in Nov 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Nathan Secler, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Charles Stroudt, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Sheffy, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Souders, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Jacob Sell, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Mahlon Speece, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

William H. Stokes, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Tilman Stuhler, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 25, 1862.

Moses Stauffer, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; discharged Nov. 26, 1862.

Jacob Saltsman, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

William Froost, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Y. Wise, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Samuel L. Weisse, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

G. Jacob Willauer, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Henry Whitman, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

Lewis Wittig, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

John Wolf, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.

George Wilber, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; not accounted for.



One Hundred and Seventy-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Drafted Militia (nine months' men).

179th Regiment

-The troops composing this regiment were from the counties of Berks, Lancaster, Montgomery, Pike, and Wayne and the city of Philadelphia. They were organized in companies at periods ranging from the 23d of October to the 6th of December, 1862, and on the 8th of December a regimental organization was effected, with the following field officers: William H. Blair, colonel; Daniel M. Yost, lieutenant-colonel; William H. Yerkes, major. Colonel Blair was at the time serving as captain in the Fifty-first Regiment, and did not join his new command until January, 1863. Before leaving Philadelphia, Company E was detached and sent for duty to the Chestnut Hill Hospital, where, with the exception of a short period soon after the battle of Gettysburg, in which it had charge of paroled prisoners in camp near West Chester, it remained until the close of its service. Soon after its organization the regiment proceeded to Fortress Monroe, and thence to Yorktown, where it formed part of the garrison at the fort, and was encamped within its walls. Upon assuming command, Colonel Blair commenced a thorough discipline of his men, with the most flattering results. Colonel Robert M. West, chief of artillery and ordnance at the fort, says of it:
"It improved rapidly, and eventually became a first-class regiment, remarkable for its proficiency in drill, the cleanliness and good order of its camp, and the quiet, orderly demeanor of the men. I never saw improvement more marked and rapid than in this case."
It did little else than garrison duty until the last of July, when it was called out to join in the movement made by General Dix up the Peninsula.
"When the movement upon Richmond was made,"
says Colonel Wrest, in the document above quoted,
"by General Dix, in the summer of this year. I was in command of the 'Advanced Brigade' of the forces that moved up the Peninsula. It became necessary to strengthen my brigade with an additional regiment, and the commanding general authorized me to designate any one I chose. I immediately named the One Hundred and Seventy-ninth, and, accordingly, Colonel Blair reported to me with his regiment, and became a part of my command. During the march to White House, and thence to Baltimore Cross-Roads, where my brigade was engaged upon two occasions, Colonel Blair's regiment was prompt and ready, and always well in hand. A peculiarity about his command was that it never had a straggler. During the return march - the most severe, on account of a drenching storm, of any I ever performed - the One Hundred and Seventy-ninth crowned its reputation as a first-class organization by being always closed and promptly in its place, whi1st other regiments were scattered for miles along the road."


Upon its return to camp it was ascertained that Lee had invaded Pennsylvania, and though its term of service was about to expire, by the unanimous vote of the men, by companies, their further services were tendered to Governor Curtin as long as he should need them for the defense of the State. This offer was accepted; but by the time the regiment had reached Washington, en route to the front, the rebel army had retreated to Virginia. It was, accordingly, ordered to Harrisburg, where, on the 27th of July, it was mustered out of service.

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.

William H. Blair, col., mustered in Dec. 8, 1862; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

Daniel M. Yost, lieutenant-col., mustered in Dec. 8, 1862; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

William H. Yerkes, maj., mustered in Dec. 30, 1862; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

Charles L. Buffington, adjt., mustered in Jan, 20, 1863; must. out with regiment July 2, 1863.

Daniel K. Kepner, quartermaster, mustered in Dec. 8, 1862; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

Charles Styer, surgeon, mustered in Jan. 13, 1863; transferred to 99th Regiment P.V., date unknown.

James R. Reily, surgeon, mustered in Sept. 4, 1862; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

William S. Prick, assist. surgeon, mustered in Dec. 17, 1862; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

James A. Richey, assist. surgeon, mustered in Jan. 3, 1863; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

J. Hiram Champion, chap., mustered in May 29, 1863; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

Henry Heydenreich, sergt.-maj., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; promoted from priv. Co. A Dec. 12, 1862; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

James T. Stackhouse, quartermaster-sergt., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; promoted from sergt. Co. G Jan. 13, 1863; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

William Flower, com. sergt., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; promoted from corp. Co. G Feb. 23, 1863; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.

Henry Ball, hosp. steward, mustered in Nov. 13, 1862; promoted from 1st sergt. Co. D Jan. 8, 1863; must. out with regiment July 27, 1863.


COMPANY A.

Peter Faust, Jr., capt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

David S. Harpel, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Amos K. Kepner, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Samuel P. Bertolet, 1st sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Aaron K. Kulp, sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Adam Schlonecker, sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry C. Grubb, sergt., mustered in Nov 4, 1862; promoted to corp. Nov. 24, 1862; to sergt. April 1, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Nathaniel Shide, sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company 27, 1863.

Henry R. Bertolet, sergt., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged by G.O. Nov. 22, 1862.

Levi De Kalb, Corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Decker, corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1861; promoted to corp. Nov. 24, 1862 must. out with company July 27, 1863.

David P. Herb, corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William Grimly, Corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; promoted to corp. Jan. 21, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Washington H. Smith, Corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Eli R. Isett, Corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

D.S. Levengood, corp., mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged Nov. 22, 1863.

H.Y. Schweinhart, corp., mustered in. Nov. 4, 1862; discharged Nov. 25, 1862.

Joseph Lenhart, musician, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jonas Hauch, musician, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged Nov. 27, 1863.

Privates.

George Andrews, mustered in Nov. 4, 1852; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jesse G. Bitting, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Bender, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Charles Blum, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry Barnhart, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William Blum, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

John Beard, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

William Buchby, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

Augustus Brandenstine, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

Samuel Biber, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

Isaiah Christian, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 25, 1862.

George Decker, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Dettera, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Josiah Davidshiser, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 24, 1862.

Querene Eckenfelt, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 11, 1862.

Michael Fox, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Fitzgerald, mustered in Nov. 4, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Gresh, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 25. 1862.

William Hoffman, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John W. Hartzel, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Hersh, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

James Hartzel, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Heinrich, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 25, 1862.

Henry Heydenreich, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; promoted to sergt.-maj. Dec. 12, 1862.

John H. Hoffmiester, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

John A. Jacoby, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

Samuel Kulp, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Kase, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Eli Lachman, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Benjamin B. Leister, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John F. Mensch, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George Madrich, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Andrew Moyer, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jesse Nyce, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27 1863.

Jacob Priesendanz, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

Henry R. Rhoads, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jacob Reifsnyder, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Roudenbush, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Francis Kahn, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William Reifsnyder, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; died July 30, 1863; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, D.C.

Solomon Stout, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry Smith, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William Scheffey, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Styer, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Philip Sell, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Austin Solomon, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Levi Scheffey, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William Schenck, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Samuel Saylor, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George Slyfer, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Benjamin F. Sacks, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jesse Snyder, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged Nov. 24, 1862.

Henry Shane, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged Nov. 25, 1862.

Adam Snellbecker, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

Charles F. Schweitzer, mustered in Nov 4, 1862.

William Umsteadt, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jonathan Vanhorn, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

Henry S. Wagoner, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Wagoner, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry W. Weand, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Elias Wummer, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; discharged Nov. 29, 1862.

John Williams, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862.

Jacob A. Yost, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862 must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John M. Zoller, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Zern, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with Company July 27, 1863.

Nathan Zern, mustered in Nov. 4, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.


COMPANY B.

John B. Frazier, capt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Alfred S. Dingman, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Charles L. Heller, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William M. Jones, 1st sergt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; promoted from sergt. Nov. 17, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Thomas A. Heller, 1st sergt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Nov. 17, 1862.

H.L. Swartwood, sergt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Lattimore, sergt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John J. Depue, sergt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William E. Sigler, sergt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

D.D. Rosencrans, sergt., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; transferred to Co. M., 163d Regiment P.V., Nov. 15, 1862.

Alonzo F. Brown, corp., mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Joseph M. Carlton, corp., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 21, 1863.

Jacob Cronewalt, corp., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Isaac B. Tyrell, corp., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Alfred C. Klotz, corp., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William F. Master, corp., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Palmer Depue, corp., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Armstrong, corp., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John McCarty, corp., mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged Nov. 24, 1862.

Stephen Vogle, musician, mustered in Dec. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George W. Smith, musician, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Lawrence Andrews, musician, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Jacob Konig, musician, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Privates.

Joseph Armbruster, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Moses Akers, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Joseph Andrews, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George W. Benson, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Conrad Beer, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Dwight Blackmore, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John F. Bower, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Anthony Bohlender, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Boyle, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Daniel Behler, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 27, 1862.

Darin Blackmore, mustered in Nov. 18, 1862; transferred to Co. M, 163d Regiment P.V., Nov. 20, 1862.

John Brady, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Jacob Behler, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

George Beer, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Charles Brown, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

William Charles, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jesse Crane, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Archibald Cheshire, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Moses R. Carlton, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 20, 1862.

Walter Cooper, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Philo P. Canning, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Samuel J. Carhuff, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

James M. Depue, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Robert Dunbar, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Dakin, mustered in Dec. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John A. Dunning, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged on surgeon certif. Nov. 16, 1862.

James H. Depue, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; trans, to Co. M, 163d Regiment P.V,, Nov. 23, 1862.

John D. Davis, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Peter Ferle, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Samuel F. Filley, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jacob Finger, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 27, 1862.

Solomon Freeby, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 23, 1862.

John Francis, mustered in Nov. 5. 1862.

William Gammon, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Wesley Greening, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Greening, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Joseph Greenzweig, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27. 1863.

Jesse F. Gunn, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Alexander Hartman, mustered in Nov. 6, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Anthony Henger, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Frank Heiney, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John K. Hunt, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Isaac Heater, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George Heater, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Francis Hess, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Anthony Heater, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; transferred to Co. M, 163d Regiment P.V., Nov. 17, 1862.

Joseph Holbert, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; died at Yorktown Va., April 27, 1863.

David Hartz, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

David V. Jagger, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John James, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Kreitz, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Klear, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

A. Knapbenborger, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Levi Klotz, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Daniel Lawrence, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Solomon S. Labar, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27,1863.

Levi Lord, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Samuel Lambert, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Edward Loreaux, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John W. Lifts, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; transferred to Co. M, 163d Regiment P.V., Nov. 13, 1862.

Michael Leary, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Matthew Moore, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Isaac W. Morris, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Stephen Markley, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 24, 1862.

Adam Morris, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; transferred to Co. M, 163d Regiment P.V., Nov. 17, 1862.

Josiah McKane, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

James H. McCarty, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 19, 1862.

James H. McCarty, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by special order, date unknown.

M.P. McDonough, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Charles Palsgrove, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jacob Pratt, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Benjamin Posteus, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Puderbaugh, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; transferred Nov. 19, 1862, organization unknown.

George W. Quick, mustered in Dec. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Charles Quinn, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Aaron Bunion, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George W. Roberts, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Lewis Beinard, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

C.D. Schoonover, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Alexander Solt, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John A. Shafer, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Benedict Spade, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Martin V. Smith, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Leonard Simonson, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Paris Swain, mustered in Nov. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Seltzer, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

John W. Smith, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862.

Charles Titman, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

A.J. Vaninwegen, mustered in Dec. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Isaac Watson, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Charles Wolfrom, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

James Walker, mustered in Dec. 22, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George Woodring, mustered in Nov. 5, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 24, 1862.


COMPANY G.

Abraham M. Metz, capt., mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Richard S. Ewing, 1st lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jesse McCombs, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry Oldfield, 1st sergt., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Thomas Hawks, sergt., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Albert Guldin, sergt., mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Eli Garner, sergt., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; promoted from corp. Feb. 28, 1863 must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry Bean, sergt., mustered in Nov. 10, 1862; promoted to Corp. Feb. 28, 1863; to sergt. June 30, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Sylvester Trumbour, sergt., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 24, 1862.

James T. Stackhouse, sergt., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; promoted to quartermaster-sergt. Jan. 13, 1863.

David W. Hartzel, corp., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; promoted to corp. Feb. 28, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George Deeg, corp., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Nathaniel Case, Corp., mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; promoted to corp. Feb. 28, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Hiram Livezey, corp., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 28, 1862.

John B. Sheard, corp., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 30, 1862.

Mathias G. Yerger, Corp., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; discharged by special order Dec. 8, 1862.

William Flower, corp., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; promoted to com. sergt. Feb. 23, 1863.

Henry W. Sparr, corp., mustered in Oct. 16, 1862.

Samuel P. Shaffer, mus., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Milton Keeler, mus., mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; discharged Nov. 13, 1862.

Privates.

Lewis Arfine, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Enoch Albertson, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Henry Badman, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George Bowers, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry M. Bucher, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Edward Badman, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Basset, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 22, 1862.

John H. Brady, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Edward C. Bates, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

John Burk, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Thomas Brown, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

John Clark, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Joseph Conver, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Colbertson, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Aaron Clymer, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Benjamin A. Cozens, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out, with company July 27, 1863.

N.B. Cressman, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; discharged by special order Nov. 22, 1862.

Charles Charlester, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Orion Corby, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Samuel N. Daub, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry Darbois, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Edward Dipple, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862.

Jacob Dieaur, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Thomas Donnelly, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

William Danim, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Solomon Kolb, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George Echart, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

James Ellis, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

John Ford, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Andrew Frick, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Henry Groff, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Augustus Grow, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

George Garner, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Mitchell Gourley, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Benjamin Grimley, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Zachariah Gerhart, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry F. Grage, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Jacob B. Huber, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Joseph Huber, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry Heins, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Jesse Heist, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Lewis Huber, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William Hartranft, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; discharged by S.O. Nov. 19, 1862.

H. Hildebrandt, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; discharged by S.O. Nov. 19, 1862.

Francis Hiare, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

G.M. Hilderbeiter, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862.

Paul Hartzell, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862.

Absalom Kolb, mustered in Jan. 21, 1863; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Solomon Kolb, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Israel Kline, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862.

George Lock, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Israel Long, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Enos Long, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Andrew Modell, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Gottlieb Myers, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Gottlieb S. Myers, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Henry Miller, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Reeden Nuss, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Arnest Nagle, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Franklin Nice, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Thomas Plunket, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Alfred Pierry, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

James Procter, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Henry H. Reed, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Samuel Richards, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 28, 1863.

Ezra Rodebaugh, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Daniel Roth, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Michael Rone, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Charles Stahlnecker, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Daniel Styer, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

William Scwink, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John F. Stevens, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; discharged by S.O. Nov. 20, 1862.

John A. Smith, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

James Smith, mustered in Nov. 10, 1862.

Charles Smith, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

John Smith, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Nathaniel Trumbour, mustered in Nov. 12. 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

M.W. Weirman, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Wenhold, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Abraham Wenhold, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

Charles Wampole, mustered in Nov. 12, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.

John Welsh, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862.

Abraham Yeakle, mustered in Nov. 8, 1862; must. out with company July 27, 1863.



COL. DANIEL M. YOST. - Philip Yost, born May, 1718, emigrated to America prior to the year 1740 from Nassau, West Germany, and settled in Limerick township, Montgomery Co. He subsequently removed to the Yost homestead, near Pottstown, in New Hanover township, which is still among the family possessions. To his wife, Veronica Dotterer, were born three sons, among whom was Philip, a native of Limerick township, whose birth occurred August 24, 1757. He served with credit during the Revolutionary war, having encamped with the army at Valley Forge during the winter of 1778 -79 and participated in the engagements at Germantown, Brandywine and Stillwater, continuing in service until the close of the conflict. He married Rosina Berninger, whose surviving sons were Benjamin B. and Philip. The former, born on the 31st of December, 1787, was a soldier of the war of 1812, and filled the offices of commissioner and register of wills in his county. He married, on the 13th of November, 1813, Sarah Feather, whose children were Isaac F., Benjamin F., Sarah and Elizabeth. The first named was born March 2, 1815, in Pottsgrove, where his life has chiefly been spent.

He has been honored with the offices of county auditor, county commissioner and associate judge, having been the last incumbent of the latter position. He married Rosina, daughter of Daniel Miller, of Pottsgrove township, and has children, - Daniel M., Benjamin M., Isaac M., Philip M., John R. and five daughters. Daniel M. Yost was born on the 27th of August, 1839, in Pottsgrove township, where he attended the public school of the district, and later received superior advantages of education at Washington Hall, situated at the Trappe. From 1852 until 1854 he varied the vocation of a teacher with labor on the farm, and in March of the latter year accepted a position as clerk in a dry-goods store in Norristown, continuing thus occupied until the beginning of the war in 1861. On the 19th of April he enlisted for three months in the Fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was during this period of service promoted to the position of first sergeant of his company. The following spring he embarked in business with J.H. Brendlinger, and during the fall of 1862, Colonel Yost again manifested his patriotism by raising a company during the emergency and immediately reporting for duty at Harrisburg.

Such was the spirit infused into this band of recruits by their captain that in thirty-six hours from the time of their enlistment they were en route for the State capital. Colonel Yost was promoted from a captaincy to the position of lieutenant-colonel of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, which was the first regiment that crossed the line into Maryland and reinforced General Reynolds at Hagerstown. On his return from service he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the One Hundred and Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and while serving with his regiment was wounded at Baltimore Cross-Roads, near White House Landing, Va. In 1864 he resumed his business relations, and has since that date been one of the representative merchants of Norristown. Colonel Yost, was, in 1863, married to Hannah, daughter of Solomon Feather, of Norristown. The children of this marriage are Daniel F., Harry F., Walter, Maria R. and Ella. Colonel Yost has been largely identified with the business interests of the borough, as also of the county. A Democrat in politics, he does not participate in the various political movements of the time and invariably declines office. He is a member of Trinity Lutheran Church, Norristown.

ELEVENTH REGIMENT.

11th Regiment

Organized Sept. 12, 1862; discharged Sept, 24 -25, 1862.

FIELD AND STAFF - Colonel, Charles A. Knoderer; lieutenant-colonel, Daniel M. Yost; major, Walter H. Cooke; adjutant, Gustavus A. North; quartermaster, Anthony G. Ely; surgeon, John B. Stearly; assistant surgeon, H.D. McLean; sergeant-major, Carroll Tyson quartermaster-sergeant, J. Howard Murray; commissary-sergeant, Richard K. Kuhn; hospital steward, Thomas H. Walton.

COMPANY C. - Captain, Henry W. Bonsall; first lieutenant, Florence Sullivan; second lieutenant, Enoch A. Banks; first sergeant, William R. Lesher; sergeants, George Coler, Thomas. J. Reiff, Valentine S. Schrack, Samuel Jamison; corporals, Henry Bodine, James Moyer, James M. Taylor, Samuel J. Potts, Samuel Walker, Joseph B. Moyer, I. Isett Freedley, George A. Lentze; musicians, Samuel C. Walker, Comly Wright.

Privates. - Theodore Adle, William H. Adle, John F. Ambler, Adam Ashenfelter, Thomas E. Ambler, Lewis H. Auchey, Francis C. Brendlinger, Charles H. Bossert, Barnet W. Beaver, Isaiah Bender, John B. Bickel, Charles G. Bare, James Buck, William P. Cuthbertson, Charles F. Corson, Jacob Derricks, Charles Day, Augustus F. Day, Harrison Evans, David W. Freas, William Fox John Fitzgerald, Jr., Charles Fegeley, Robert C. Fries, Charles Fitzwalter, Joseph Greaves, David Groff, James M. Ganser, Joshua Gilbert, Samuel Gotwalts, Washington Griffith, Jr., Ivins R. Hansell, Samuel Henshall, Milton H. Hauck, Isaac R. Hunsicker, Aaron Hendricks, Joseph Jones, David Krause, Henry Kinkener, Benjamin F. Kerper, Wattson Kirkbride, Marcus Kipner, Charles Lewis, Malcolm Lindsay, J. Wood Lukens, Benton Maloney, John R. Major, William H. McCrea, Walter L. McClennan, Samuel L. McClennan, James McMicken, Daniel McClurey, George W. Neiman, Thomas O'Neil, James O'Neil, Irvin Poley, Walter E. Patton, John Potts, Jacob H. Richards, Sylvester N. Rich, Theodore F. Rodenbough, Levi Rush, Lewis Styer, William H. Stroud, Francis G. Stinson, Levi Shrauder, William H. Sheive, Daniel G. Sherman, William T. Shnell, Samuel C. Scheetz, Thomas B. Sutch, John Sands, Amos E. Styer, Samuel Thomas, William Thomas, John Thomas, Charles M. Tatem, Mark Thomson, William Vaughan, Theodore F. White, Abraham A. Yeakle.

COMPANY D. - Captains, Walter H. Cook (promoted to maj. Sept. 15, 1862); John C. Snyder (promoted from 1st lieutenant Sept. 16, 1862); first lieutenant, Henry Brown (promoted from private Sept. 16, 1862); second lieutenant, Henry G. Arnold; first sergeant, Charles McCally; sergeants, J. Evans Isett, Walter Scott, Benjamin F. Vancourt corporals, Elias Fluck, George Delp, John K. Ra1ston, Benjamin F. Sally; musician, Howard Gordon.

Privates. - Ellwood Ambler, Jesse Ambler, Wilmer Atkinson, James M. Botten, John Bodey, Enos Bosch, Charles Biswick, William H. Bodey, Lawrence A.E. Corson, John H. Dager, Peter Defenback, William Edler, Charles P. Harry, John H. Hope, Robert Iredell, Jr., Charles C. Isett, Howard M. Jenkins, Thomas A. Montgomery, Edward Murray, William Moore, John McDonald, Robert McDonald, William Rittenhouse, Samuel Rossiter, Isaac M. Templin, Elijah Thomas, Jonathan Thomas, Carroll S. Tyson (promoted to sergt-maj. Sept. 20, 1862), Israel Wentz; John H. White, John C. Wieland, Arnold Williams, Wallace Williams, H.C. Zimmerman, John Zimmerman.

COMPANY G. - Captain, Daniel M. Yost (promoted to lieutenant-col. Sept. 15, 1862); first lieutenant, Jesse L. Geist; second lieutenant, Daniel K. Kepner; first sergeant, David S. Harpel; sergeants, John F. Sabold, Samuel S. Bertolet, Aaron G. Krause, Adam Saylor; corporals, Benjamin H. Markley, Benjamin M. Yost, Valentine Hartenstine, Daniel M. Stetler, Amos K. Kepner, Benjamin F. Harpel, Jacob G. Neiffer, Augustus Adams; musician, James Markley.

Privates. - Daniel Acker, Henry Bernhard, David Beary, Charles Beiser, Albert G. Bertolet, Ephraim A.P. Bertolet, Jacob Binder, Joshua H. Brendlinger, Franklin Brendlinger, John Bauman, Abraham R. Bertolet, John M. Decker, Abraham H. Dotterer, John H. Dotterer, Querine Eckenfels, Isaac L. Erb, Frederick S. Fagley, Peter Faust, Jr., Jacob Fryer, Nathaniel Feather, Milton Gilbert, Enos Gotshall, Henry S. Geist, Henry Groff, Jesse Hallman, John K. Hauck, George W. Hauck, Conrad Hauser, Thomas F. Hoffmeier, Daniel H. Heffner, David P. Herb, Joel Hartenstine, William B. Hoffman. Levi D. Kalb, William K. Kepner,, Jonas G. Krause, Aaron K. Kalb, John S. Kase, George Ladshaw, Charles Lachman, D.G. Leidheiser, David Levengood, Augustus Mayberry, John V. Meekert, Sylvester Moser, Henry M. Moyer, Henry M. Miller, Jesse Nyce, Jesse Oxenford, Jeremiah Prutzman, Francis Rawn, Jonas F. Reinert, Albert H. Richards, George R. Ruchstuhl, Mahlon Ratz, Washington H. Smith; Levi Scheffey, William Sabold, Augustus Shaffer, Ephraim B. Scheffey, Henry Y. Schweinhart, George H. Shaner, Jonas K. Smith, Henry Stufflet, Henry Stetler, John Stetler, William Umsted, Henry W. Weand, Samuel Weiss, Josiah M. Yerger, William Young, Philip Yahn, John Yahn, John M. Zoller.

COMPANY H. - Captain, Barclay Hall; first lieutenant, Edmund B. Nuss; second lieutenant, William W. Dalby; first sergeant, Edward S. Tomlinson; sergeants, Francis Vontheinan, William F. Donley, Edward Hoary, Peter F. Davis; corporals, Jesse Hall, James Davis, John S. Hipple, Bradford Lee, Conrad Burke, Charles J. Halloway, Francis H. Lubee, Samuel Pugh; musician, John Murray.

Privates. - William Adams, John Bailey, Conrad Bumgarten, Martin Bumgarten, Edward Bailey, Cornelius Bradley, Daniel Cohler, Morton Caffey, Roger Currey, Samuel Dunlap, Edward Downey, Booth Durnip, Richard Ewing, Samuel Elliott, Freeman Fleck, Daniel Ford, Matthias Glanzinger, George Hibbs, James Holland, Henry Hummel, Henry Jones, William Looney, Edward Mochler, Patrick Murphy, John Mahlon, Robert McCurdy, Andrew McFarland, William Pollock, Andrew Quinley, John Razor, William Ray, Henry Stemple, Charles Simpson, Davis Smith, Robert Smith, Benjamin Smith, David Stevens, Owen Scanlan, Jacob Ulrick, Hiram C. Wager, Levi Whiteman, Robert White, Thomas Wilfong, Joseph Wheeler, James Wood.

SEVENTEENTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA MILITIA.

17th Regiment Pennsylvania Militia

Organized Sept. 17, 1862; discharged Sept. 25, 26, 27, 28. 1862.

FIELD AND STAFF. - Colonel, James Gilkyson; lieutenant -colonel, Charles S. Leader; major, Edward S. Shessler; adjutant, Franklin March; quartermaster, John A.L. Tice; surgeon, Isaac Hughes; quartermaster-sergeant, Charles S. Atkinson.

COMPANY B. - Captain, Benjamin M. Boyer; first lieutenant, Charles Hunsicker; second lieutenant, William H. Snyder; first sergeant, William B. Maitland; sergeants, Hiram Lysinger, Samuel Rodenbaugh, Edward P. Benter, Lewis H. Bowman; corporals, Adam H. Fetterolf, Julius Hood, Josiah Christman, George Emery, Charles Sutch, Jacob B. Hunsicker, James D. Ash, Franklin March (promoted to adjt. Sept. 17, 1862).

Privates. - James C. Allabaugh, Jacob S. Aaron, Richard Bate, John Butcher, Samuel Brooke, Isaiah Bradford, Isaac Barton, John Colehouser, Jacob R. Custer, Isaac Cooke, John Deem, Henry Edwards, Samuel Edwards, Thomas B. Fisher, Edward Fagan, William F. Force, William E. Fulmer, Lewis Garner, John Garber, James Gotwaltz, Jacob M. Hensell, Robert S. Hood, John Holland, John Heddleson, David K. Humbert, John Hart, Elias C. Jones, Samuel Johnson, Jacob Kramer, Daniel C. Kepler, Henry W. Kratz, Henry Lehman, Preston Lewis, Laurence Larkins, Benjamin Lightfoot, Isaac C. Lysinger, Daniel Lysinger, Morris S. Longstreth, Henry C. Moser, Allen Martin, Edward Murray, Enos Major, Daniel Miller, James McGintey, John McCoy, Peel B. McCord, Jarret T. Preston, William W. Painter, Henry Quillman, George W. Rogers, Davis Ramage, Charles J. Royer, Joseph W. Royer, William H. Rittenhouse, Levi Rosenberger, Adam Rodebaugh, Samuel Rodebaugh, George Rodebaugh, George Seelah, John Shuttleworth, James Sloan, Goorge W. Snyder, Peter H. Schaffer, Francis H. Shupe, Thomas Slutterer, Samuel Taylor, Reuben Taney, Samuel H. Treichler, Thomas White, Matthias P. Walker, Edward P. Zimmerman.

COMPANY G. - Captain, Harrison M. Lutz; first lieutenant, Henry C. Hughes; second lieutenant, Horatio Ogden; first sergeant, Charles S. Griffith; sergeants, Henry E. Newberry, James Hustler, William H. Shainline, Colbert Reiger; corporals, Isaac Ramsey, George W. Ho1stein, William H. Ho1stein, Charles D. Hess, Joseph Barrett, John Richards, David F. Skean, Frank Tomney.

Privates. - Henry Armstrong, John Broughton, Hugh Cassiday, Samuel Coats, Edward Delany, Jonas Eastwood, John Graham, Lewis Glenn, Charles R. Griffith, Frederick Goll, William H. Geiger, Joseph Harrison, Amos T. Holt, S. Hallman Hart, Hiram O. Hallman, John A. Keiger, James Keating, Robert Keller, Nathaniel Laver, Charles Lyle, Franklin Lyle, Henry Linley, William Millington, John A. Mitchell, John H. Mangle, William McCracken, Charles Pickup, Robert Patton, Joseph Russell, Walter B. Rambo, Morris Richardson, Christian F. Skean, Hiram Supplee, James Supplee, Benjamin Y. Shainline, Jonathan H. Supplee, Martin Stamp, Davis Sweeny, Elias Smith, Michael Sherry, William Swann, Jesse Updegrove, Squire Whitehead, Patrick Walters, Michael Wheeler.

NINETEENTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA MILITIA.

19th Regiment Pennsylvania Militia

Organized Sept. 15, 1862; discharged Sept. 27, 1862.

FIELD AND STAFF. - Colonel, Robert Klotz; lieutenant-colonel, Daniel Nagle; major, William H. Churchman; adjutant, Herman B. Graeff; quartermaster, Lewis W. Crawford; assistant surgeon, Daniel T. Batdorf; chaplain, Alfred A. Fisher; sergeant -major, D. Sylvester Stine quartermaster-sergeant, William H. Bowyer; commissary sergeant, David H. McNair.

COMPANY E. - Captain, John H. Hobart; first lieutenant, George Rice second lieutenant, Thomas C. Steele; first sergeant, William A. Dyer; sergeants, William S. Wells, Henry Potts. Jr., Franklin A. Yocum, Alexander Malsberger; corporals, William C. Beecher, Samuel R. Ellis, Charles Lessig, Miller D. Evans, George D. Meigs, Isaac Umstead, Daniel W. Davis, John Lord; musicians, George W. Morrow, Robert H. Hobart.

Privates. - Charles J. Adamson, Lyman Beecher, Robert Bice, Jerome B. Byar, Francis Bach, John S. Bachman, Mahlon R. Buchert, William J. Binder, Benjamin B. Brant, Harrison Bean, Horace A. Custer, John Corbitt, Marmaduke B. Casselberry, William Davis, Anthony Dunn, Samuel S. Daub, David D. Endy, Oliver Evans, Samuel Y. Eisenberger, Jonathan Fregh, Charles Frick, Henry F. Fogle, Jonas D. Fritch, Peter Good, Daniel F. Graham, Davis R. Hendricks, Nathaniel P. Hobart, Ephraim Hartranft, Josiah Huber, Luke Higgins, Nathaniel Harner, John W. Hollowbush, John Hause, John H. Hunsberger, John R. Irwin, Hiram C. Jones, William H. Johnston, Francis Jordan, Daniel H. Keim, James W. Keim, George T. Keim, Henry G. Kulp, Enos Keller, William H. Lachman, Michael Lessig, William H. Landis, Henry P. Leaf, Van Buren Missimer, Cornelius Mara, Cyrus W.O. Nyce, Lewis R. Neiman, Edmund E. Newlin, Joseph Potts, Jr., Joseph McKean Potts, Ephraim Reifsnyder, Peter W. Reifsnyder, Peter S. Reifsnyder, Henry P. Rutter, William I. Butter, Jerome Ruth, Peter Ruth, John D. Rothrock, Henry A. Richards, Mark H. Richards, Christopher Shaner, Enos H. Shaner, Englebert Shaner, Augustus W. Shick, Henry B. Smull, Henry K. Stout, Oliver A. Shelladay, William B. Stranford, John Wagner, Lewis Ward, Harrison R.M. Whitman, John Weidner, George Wanger, William L. Williamson, Samuel Y. Weaver, Henry Walt, Jr., Matthias G. Yergy, Jacob C. Yost.

INDEPENDENT CAVALRY COMPANIES.



Organized Sept. 18, 1862; discharged Sept. 25, 1862.

Captain, Samuel W. Comly; first lieutenant, Joseph Longstreth second lieutenant, Austin L. Taggart; first sergeant, William R. Wister sergeants, Charles C. Longstreth, Charles C. Walton, John S. Wise, Thomas Bitting; corporals, George G. McNeill, John Donat, George F. Robeson, Christian Stout, Alfred J. Snyder, Thomas Patton Privates. - Charles T. Aiman, Matthew Anson, William Bitting, William H. Boude, Benjamin E. Buzby, George W. Castner, Abraham H. Clayton, Enos Clayton, Hamilton Clayton, Charles Comley, Nathan Comley, Charles Culp, Jr., George W. Engleman, Isaac Fell, Manassah Fries, Andrew Gilinger, Harrison Goodwin, Elwood Gourley, William T. Harvey, Daniel Jones, Evan Jones, George M. Jones, Francis A. Katz, Elwood Kirk, Joseph Kirkner, Andrew Lightcap, Jacob F. Lukens, Elwood Paul, Enoch T. Parvin, Hiram Potts, Elias H. Potts, James Quirk, Philip S. Reed, Peter Rittenhouse, Ezra S. Shermer, Edward S. Stahlnecker, Jacob Stahlnecker, Charles Stout, Jonathan Thomas, William Tobid, Jr., Joseph E. Van Meter, David Wood, Frank Yerkes.

Organized Sept. 13, 1862; discharged Sept. 27, 1862.

Captain, Daniel H. Mulvany;(2*****) first lieutenant, J. Kurtz Zook; second lieutenant, A. Jackson Anderson; first sergeant, Frederick K. Haws, sergeants, E. Channing Potts, John S. Shearer, George Peckin, A. Brower Longaker; corporals, Thomas Humphreys, Solomon Gilbert, Archibald D. Thompson, Benjamin Custer, William W. Davis.

Privates. - Lewis K. Beerer, John Coats, Josiah Culp, Frank B. Deeds, Lewis H. Davis, Hugh Dehaven, Philip Daniels, John Grant, George Garrett, John Graham, Jacob Guns, Leonard Hendricks, Nathan H. Hughes, Lewis Hagey, Alexander Hanna, Samuel F. Jarrett, David S. Kulp, George Keys, George Longaker, William B. Logan, John Leedon, Ethvin Moore, David McClure, Davis Roudebush, John Rigley, Charles Razor, William Stillwagon, David M. Stacker, John S. Temple, Spencer Thompson, William N. Walker, John A. Woodhus.

Mustered in June 17, 1863; discharged July 30, 1863.

captain, Samuel W. Comly, first lieutenant, Joseph C. Longstreth; second lieutenant, Austin L. Taggart; first sergeant, William R. Wister; quartermaster-sergeant, Thomas Bitting; sergeants, Enos Clayton, William G. Bosler, Joseph Kirkner, Jr., John S. Wise, Harry R. Brown; corporals, Charles Comley, Charles Stout, Ellwood Gourley, Benjamin R. Meyers, Jacob H. Michener, George W. Bush, George B. Rayner, David S. Grafly.

Privates. - Josiah Ambler, Wilmer Atkinson, Dager Bush, Marshall E. Battin, Jacob Y. Bates, John E. Bartholomew, Andrew N. Brice, Michael Bushey, Charles A. Brinton, Charles Culp, John Cross, Thomas M. Clayton, Edwin Claxton, Henry Cook, Walter H. Cook, William Cahill, John J. Dager, Robert P. Dager, Franklin Dewees, Henry C. Deckart, Joshua L. Fields, John E. Faurice, Charles E. Faurice, Harrison C. Green, William B. Hart, Nathan E. Hughes, Samuel H. Hough, John Jacobs, William Jones, Howard H. Jenkins, Ellwood Kirk, Abraham S. Kulp, Rader K. Kraft, Morris P. Kirk, Henry Z. Kibler, Hicks Lukens, Charles Longstreth, Samuel D. Moser, Patrick Murray, Richard Moore, William R. Myers, Patrick McGillen, George K. McMiller, Charles Newman, John S. Perry, Charles W. Patterson, Elias H. Potts, Clayton Phipps, Henry Reitabaugh, Jesse Roberts, Jr., William F. Sadler, George W. Stackhouse, Walter Scott, Joseph Stahlnecker, John W. Taylor, Carroll S. Tyson, Stephen Walton, Mahlon S. Walton, Lewis S. Whitcomb, William Weimar, Joseph J. Yocum, John Yerkes.

INDEPENDENT CAVALRY BATTALION.



Mustered in July 2 -10, 1863; discharged Aug. 21, 1863.

COMPANY B.(26*) - Captain, Frederick R. Haws; first lieutenant, George R. Pechin; second lieutenant, George P. Yocum; first sergeant, Harry C. Johnson; sergeants, George Pechin, Jr., Samuel F. Jarrett, David Schrack, John F. Anderson; corporals, Thomas W. Humphreys, Joseph H. Barrett, Archibald D. Thompson, John H. Stacker, Alexander Gotwalts, Peter Crouse, Charles P. Egbert, William H. Stillwagon; musicians, Hophin V. Johnson, John Hunsicker.

Privates. - James Q. Atkinson, George W. Berry, William H. Bainbridge, Jacob Buckwalter, John Coats, Charles A. Cox, Benjamin Custer, Edwin Conrad, A.W. Cooper, William R. Cox, John Deal, L.Y. Eisenberry, Samuel Edwards, Hiram H. Fulmer, John Fulmer, Jr., Seth Fulmer, Edward Freas, Edward Gorgas, Theodore Gillinger, George L. Garrigues, Leonard Hendricks, George Hagy, Jesse Hutz, Ivins Hansell, Charles Hansell, Charles L. Haws, Charles C. Johnson, Augustus Huhn, Stephen T. Kirk, George W. Kibblehouse, Abraham R. Moyer, Edwin Moore, Hugh Mason, John C. Morgan, William H. Meigs, George W. Mancill, Henry Mavaugh, Josiah Note, William B. Nungesser, Enoch H. Parvin, E. Channing Potts, Cornelius Rhoads, Andrew S. Rahn, Atkinson H. Ritch, Reuben Y. Ramsey, Louis Styer, Charles Smith, Jacob Shaffer, Morton C. Streeper, Albert F. Shaw, John Spencer, Harry Sturgis, Thomas H. Snyder, Isaac H. Templin, Isaac W. Weirman, James C. Ward, John Wildsmith, Elwood H. Worrell, Natiman S. Woolf, James Wells.

The following company was recruited from Montgomery County, though it served in the First New Jersey Cavalry:

COMPANY A, FIRST NEW JERSEY CAVALRY. - Theodore Michenor, private, sergeant and second lieutenant; Joshua P. Kirk, corporal and sergeant; Samuel Waalton, private and sergeant; Algernon Waalton, sergeant; John P. Marple, corporal and sergeant; Cephas Ross, private, corporal and sergeant; Edwin Twining, sergeant; G.R. Roberts, corporal and sergeant; William M. Shaw, private and sergeant; William Hollowell, corporal and sergeant; Harrison Megargee, private, corporal and sergeant; James D. Walton, private, corporal and sergeant; John D. Williams, private, corporal and sergeant; Ephraim H. Crosdale, private and sergeant John C. Hobensack, sergeant; Isaac Jannett, private, corporal and sergeant; Theodore Johnson, corporal; Charles E. Wilson, private and sergeant; John F. Buck, private and sergeant; Thomas J. Hellings, private and corporal; David J. Walton, corporal and sergeant; Washington M. Raisner, private and corporal; Theodore Radcliff, private and sergeant; Lawrence Rush, private and bugler; Charles J. Shelmire, private and corporal; Charles B. Perkinpine, corporal; Edmund Scott, corporal and sergeant; Charles Myers, blacksmith.

Privates. - John Barker, James Bloomer, Joshua Boyles, Henry Cash, Charles R. Coffman, John Black, James Conn, Elias P. Hall, John H. Craven, Thomas M. Crosdale, Rush Griffith, Henry Hagerman, Harrison Johnson, Jonathan Johnson, Elwood Knowles, Joseph  Levis, William C. Lower, Alexander McAffee, Thomas Nice, Henry V. Slug, William Sterling, William Taggart, Alfred Walton, William Webb, Albert D. Young, Charles B. Chandler, William Montgomery, John Peaze, William Tranger, Harvey Tomlinson, James H. Williams.

TWENTY-SIXTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA MILITIA.

26th Regiment Pennsylvania Militia

Colonel William W. Jennings, commanding.

Mustered in June 19 -22, 1863; discharged July 30, 1863.

COMPANY F. - Captain, George Rice; first lieutenant, Henry Potts, Jr.; second lieutenant, Mark H. Richards; first sergeant, William A. Dyer; sergeants, George Scheetz, William S. Lessig, William G. Meigs, Englebert Lessig; corporals, Mahlon V. Smith, John S. Loyd, Miller D. Evans, John Corbert, Henry Richards, John Guest, P.W. Davis, Charles W. Macdonald.

Privates. - John Auchey, Jerome Byer, William P. Buckley, Christian G. Blair, Edwin H. Bechtel, Nathaniel Bickel, William J. Binder, John R. Caswell, Horace A. Custer, Mahlon Collar, Hiram Collar, Samuel S. Daub, Abram Derolf, Robert Ennis, Daniel E. Ellis, Jonas D. Fritch, John H. Fryer, Thomas W. Feger, Jonathan Fray, Benjamin Frock, Charles Frick, John B. Ford, John Fry, Michael Fryer, Daniel Graham, Henry C. Hitner, Samuel Hetzall, Jefferson F. Huber, Joseph L. Hays, Jr., Levi Herring, Paul Herring, Isaac Herring, John W. Hollowbush, Jonathan Hummel, Henry Huber, Henry J. Hobart, Nathaniel P. Hobart, Jr., Josiah Huber, Howard Jacobs, Cyrus Kraner, Henry Kemerling, George B. Lessig, George Liggett, David R. Landis, William Lachman, Michael Lessig, George Moyer, George Meigs, Van Buren Missimer, Merit Missimer, George Morrow, Patterson Marshall, Theodore MeKane, Cyrus Nice, Henry A. Prutzman, Samuel W. Pennypacker, Henry G. Rahn, John Rhodes, Richard Renshaw, Joseph G. Renard, Benjamin S. Rowe, Thomas Reddy, Calvin B. Sponsler, Edwin F. Smith, George W. Shanner, Robert F. Small, Israel Spancake, Ephraim Schrope, George Steele, Augustine W. Slick, William J. Thomas, Werner Thomas, Joseph K. Welles, William W. Wynn, Frank Wagoner.

THIRTY-FOURTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA MILITIA (EMERGENCY MEN.)

34th Regiment Pennsylvania Militia

Mustered in June 3, 1863; discharged Aug. 24, 1863.

FIELD AND STAFF. - Colonel, Charles Albright; lieutenant-colonel, Edward Schall major, Robert E. Taylor; adjutant, Abraham S. Schropp; quartermaster, Edmund Doster; surgeon, Lewis C. Cummins; assistant surgeon, Eugene H. Smyser; sergeant-major, Oliver Brenheiser; commissary sergeant, Frederick Lauderburn; quartermaster-sargeant, Jacob H. Wirt; hospital steward, David R. Beaver.

COMPANY B. - Captain, Benjamin F. Bean; first lieutenant, John B. Roberts; second lieutenant, Aaron Weikel ; first sergeant, Henry Longstreth; sergeants, William Heebner, John Jarrett, William G. Harley, William H. Gristock; corporals, Cadwalader H. Brook, Joseph A. Henry, John P. Cox, Vosburgh N. Shaffer, William W. Wisler, Edwin L. Neiman, Joseph P. Watson, Charles C. Waltz.

Privates, - Simeon Buzzard, Jr., George W. Bean, John H. Buckwalter, Charles Biger, Thomas Bivan, Lewis W. Bean, Adam Barrett, Abram Brower, Jr., John W. Bennett, Elliott Case, Warren Crater, John Crater, Jonas H. Crater, Henry Cook, Thompson Davis, John B. Deeds, James N. Davidson, John Francis, John H.W. Francis, William Gundy, Charles F. Grover, Thomas D. Grover, Elhannon H. Gotwaltz, John High, Henry Highley, Isaac Elhannon, George W. Harpst, Benjamin Hoopes, Daniel G. Hendricks, Peter V. Hoy, Harris Harrington, George W. Jacobs, Thomas D. Jones, Arnold Hirkner, William G. Kungle, Charles Lukens, Charles A. Murray, Charles Markle, Anthony Mosteller, William A. Miller, Joseph L. Meigs, James S. Moses, Owen McCabe, Thomas W. Pennypacker, Thomas Peart, Leopold Polzol, David Reese, Sylvester Rapp, Joseph Rossiter, Thomas Rossiter, Jr., Thomas J. Rapp, Joseph P. Robinson, Matthew H. Robberts, Wallace A. Rambo, Samuel Ruth, Henry Ruth, Matthew Ross, Jacob Ross, John S. Rahn, Frank Rhoads, Jesse Roshong, Samuel Sower, Edwin F. Siter, Henry Snyder, Matthias P. Showalter, David B. Stout, William R. Smith, Abram W. Snyder, Isaac Sahler, John Smith, George Smith, Isaac Schwenk, John Spare, Samuel Star, Aaron H. Snyder, Joseph H. Tyson, David Trucksess, Jr., Uriah C, Ullman, John R. Umstead, George L. Whitworth, Samuel S. Wait. neight, Henry Wissimer, John H. Weikel, John Young, Joseph Zimmerman.

COMPANY C. - Captain, Henry H. Fetterolf; first lieutenant, William H. Snyder; second lieutenant, Emanuel Longacre; first sergeant, Henry H. Hunsicker; sergeants, Henry H. Fretz, William Bean, Canning F. Peixoto, Morris R. Hunsicker; corporals, Abner S. Johnson, William Hallman, George Bergdol, Matthias T. Williams, William Studer, Jacob Garber, David Spare, Hezekiah B. Hahn; musicians, David F. Wack, Jerome Fox.

Privates. - Henry Arehart, Charles Barthe, John Bear, William Bergey, George Davis, Job Davis, Harrison Detwiler, Frank. Essig, Samuel Fenstermacher, Adam H. Fetterolf, Orlando Fisher, Henry Fitzgerald, John H. Fox, Jonas Fox, John Frankenberger, Jesse Freas, John F. Gristock, David Gross, Jacob Heilman, John Heistand, Henry W. Howe, Horace W. Hunsicker, Isaac R. Hunsicker, Abner W. Johnson, Isaac Krieble, Abram N. Kerper, Benjamin Kulp, Isaac Kook, Benjamin C. Kratz, William Keelor, John Landes, Daniel G. Landes, Morris Longstreth, William Mattis, Charles W. March, Ephraim Mills, Henry Prizer, John F. Patterson, John Rowe, William Reiff, John Richard, Abel Rahn, Thomas Ready, John Springer, Frank Showalter, Matthias Shaffer, Emanuel Shaffer, John Shaffer, John Shotts, William F. Swartley, John Stern, Frederick Shannon, Samuel H. Treichler, John Willaner, Isaac Walt, William Worrall, Henry Wesler, Jacob Zollers, Valentine Zohlers.

COMPANY E. - Captains, Robert E. Taylor (promoted to major July 3, 1863), Florence Sullivan; first lieutenant, Enoch A. Banks; second lieutenant, George H. Coler; first sergeant, Daniel H. Stein; sergeants, Samuel Jamison, Valentine S. Schrack, Thomas J. Reif, John A. Slemmer; corporals, Renny Fiegel, Charles Hoffman, George T. Carpenter, Franklin Moloney, Samuel Walker, Samuel Scheetz, George Neiman, Washimigton J. Griffith; musicians, Franklin

Duboisq, Clayton Weber.

Privates. - William Adle, Adam Ashenfelter, Jacob Alker, Charles H. Atkens, Elijah K. Bruner, Charles Bossert, William Body, Henry Belcher, Isaac Bolton, Josiah Bolton, Lewis K. Berer, Henry Baker, Lewis H. Bowman, Barnet W. Beaver, Richard Bate, James Bickel, James Baton, George D. Bolton, Benjamin E. Chain, William P. Cuthbertson, Josiah Christman, Jerome W. Cowden, Lewis H. Davis, William Davis, Henry A. Derr, Franklin Daddy, Henry Eschbach, Daniel S. Fillman, Charles H. Freas, David W. Freas, Amandes Garges, James H. Ganser, Christian Ganser, Samuel Henshell, J. Henry Hoover, Alexander Hoover, Henry C. Hill, David Heebner, George Harmatt, William Hallowell, Charles C. Isett, J. Evans Isett, Robert Iredell, Jr., Benjamin F. Kerper, William H. Lewis, George W. Lewis, Jacob G. Landis, Malcolm Linzey, Samuel Lightcap, Richard Markley, James Moyer, Theodore Munshower, Joseph B. Moyer, John Macombs, Preston D. Miles, Joseph G. McConnell, Samuel McCarter, Charles Orner, Thomas O'Neill, John Paulus, Thomas Petherick, Thomas Philips, Theodore Rutty, Jacob H. Richards, John Rich, Isaac N. Roberts, John Slingluff, Charles H. Stinson, Francis G. Stinson, William W. Shieve, Christian Stahl, Mark Thompson, Samuel Thomas, Samuel Taylor, Ed. Taylor, Leonard H. Thomas, Charles Wright, William G. Wright, Abraham A. Yeakle.

COMPANY H - Captains, Edward Schall (promoted to lieutenant-colonel July 3, 1863), John Deem; first lieutenant, Samuel B. Painter; second lieutenant, James H. Buck; first sergeant, Nathan McCall; sergeants, William T. Roberts, John Bond, David Markley, Allen Martin; corporals, Ivan Famous, Joshua Hollowell, Albin Bailey, Charles McGlathery, Charles Finley, John Guyder, David H. Finley, Jesse Keeler; musicians, Addison Cornog, Harmon Jordan.

Privates. - Israel Aker, William Allen, Edward Batchelder, Francis Baker, Charles Bard, William Bolton, Augustus Bell, Franklin Beaver, William Bale, John Boas, Alexander Calhoun, William Chantry, Jesse Conaway, Thomas Chillington, John L. Dotts, John Pimpsey, Philip Eisenbenry, William Edler, Ashur Harp, William Fulmer, James Fury, James Gotwals, John W. Geiger, George W. Geyer, Edward Garner, James Hoff, John Hill, Alfred Helfenstein, Charles Hasting, Joseph P. Harper, Jacob Hasting, Wilson James, Daniel Jones, Thomas Jones, John Kane, Benjamin Keyser, Charles Lukens, Charles Lougherty, Joseph Linker, Charles Moore, Richard M. Mills, George McNickle, Frederick Nungesser, Thomas Norman, Joseph Nungesser, John O'Daniel, Edward Priest, William Rhoads, Peter C. Riggs, Charles Ramsey, John Rimby, James Rookstool, Joseph Roberts, William S. Ramsey, Jacob Robbins, Alfred Selah, Josiah Selah, William Selah, George Somers, Alexander Schall, Alfred Shettleworth, Francis Smedley, Francis Smedley, Franklin Teaney, George W. Taylor, James Uebele, William Vanfossen, Frederick Warner, Charles Wisner, Thomas G. Wright, John White, Randolph Williamson, John Y. Young, Albert R. Young, Jacob Zimmerman.

COMPANY I. - Captain, Henry M. Lutz; first lieutenant, Henry C. Hughes; second lieutenant, Henry E. Newberry; first sergeant, Colbert Keiger; sergeants, John A. Keiger, William Swann, Stanly L. Ogden, Lewis Glenn; corporals, John H. Mangle, John Richards, David F. Skeen, Amos T. Holt, John Leedom, Ivans Rambo, Thomas Rodgers, Martin Stamp; musician, Samuel Coats.

Privates. - David Ashenfelter, Charles J. Adamson, John Barnes, Samuel G. Beckwith, Glendore Bare, John B. Buzby, William Cutler, Samuel P. Connor, Miles Doyle, Charles B. Evans, Frank Eastburn, John Eynon, James Eynon, Emanuel Force, Nathan Fornwalt, John Graham, John Gordon, William H.H. Glenn, Jacob Geiger, Lemuel G. Harris, Isaiah Hampton, John Hertzog, Frederick W. Horn, Robert Irwin, Henry P. Keiger, Robert Keller, Samuel Morris, Joseph Millington, William Millington; John A. Mitchell, Robert Patton, John Patton, Charles Pickup, Hiram Rambo, Walter B. Rambo, Thomas Rafferty, John Rogan, Thomas F. Robinson, Morris Richardson, James S. Supplee, Adam R. Supplee, George W. Smith, Benjamin Y. Shainline, Davis Sweeny, John Smith, Cleaver R. Supplee, Christian F. Skeen, George W. Supplee, William Templeton, Jesse Updegrove, George White, David White, George Wagner, William Young.

FORTY-FIRST REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA MILITIA (EMERGENCY MEN).

41st Regiment Pennsylvania Militia

Colonel Edward H. Mayer, commanding.

Mustered in July 1, 1863; discharged Aug. 3 -4, 1863.

COMPANY B. - Captain, John McCasey; first lieutenant, William O'Neill, second lieutenant, Michael W. Hurley; first sergeant, Michael Regan; sergeants, Patrick Caveny, Anthony Haneham, James Lynch, Edward Blewitt; corporals. Martin Collins, Francis Beamish. Patrick Ratchford, Michael Cassady, James Corbett, Thomas McGee, Patrick Mitchell, Patrick Houston; musicians, Edward Howells, Jonathan Costlette.

Privates. - James Bamerick, Andrew Burk, Thomas R. Barrett, Thomas Barrett, James Burns, Samuel Bryant, John W. Collins, William Cramer, George Cooper, John Churchill, William D. Coupels, William Daniels, Thomas Farrell, George Finnell, James Farley, James Flynn, John Gleason, William Gaughin, John Gordon, William Gallager, James Griffith, Michael Hurley, John Howell, Thomas Jones, David James, Patrick Kearney, Christopher Keenan, Charles Knapp, John Kline, Thomas Lang, John Larnard, Thomas Leonard, Warren L. Long, Michael Lee, Theodore Larnard, Peter Larkin, Patrick Murphy, James Mullaney, Charles Mathews, John Martyn, Simon Miller, Austin Malea, William Mathews, Charles McFarland, John McLane, Patrick McAndrew, Charles McLaughlin, Michael McCasey, Michael J. Nihill, George Nicholas, John O'Neill, James O'Neill, David Potts, John Ratchford, Patrick Riley, Michael Riley, William Sullivan, John Scott, Charles Somers, Stephen D. Soule (promoted to adjutant July 5, 1863), John Tierney, Tunis J. Thomas, Michael Tighe, William Wright, Eli Williams,

Frank W. Watson (promoted to sergeant-major July 5, 1863).

COMPANY H. - Captain, B Markley Boyer; first lieutenant, Charles Hunsicker; second lieutenant, John Henan; first sergeant, Charles G. Freed; sergeants, Edward P. Bonter, John Collins, David Longhery, Henry B. Dickinson; corporals, Patrick Diomond, Frank Maloy, Andrew Rhodes, John Shade, Daniel Stout, Joseph Doud, Patrick McDonald, Charles Hallman; musicians, Lewis Rapine, Henry S. Miller.

Privates. - Williams Ansley, Michael Bradley, Charles Bradley, James Bradley, Charles Baker, Edward Baker, George W. Boas, Joseph Bradley, John Cullen, Michael Cavanaugh, Owen Cahill, Edward Dugan, Timothy Furlong, Lewis Flume, Charles H. Garber, John Hagan, William Hullinger, John Hullinger, John Holland, John Lawler, Abraham B. Longaker, Franklin March, Simon Mathews, John Mitten, Henry McGlade, David McAfee, Dennis McKibben, Bernard McNickels, Edward McMunn, Thomas McKibben, Thomas McEwen, John Nungesser, Sr., Felix O'Neil, Philip Powers, Robert Patton, James Redman, Daniel Reilly, Thomas Rotch, Michael Sherry, Charles Selah, Jacob Stiner, Edward Stout, Joseph Sackett, Luke Shiners, Hamilton Torrey, John Thomas, Frank Tornney, John Welsh, Charles Young.

FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA MILITIA.

43rd Regiment

Mustered in July 6, 1863; discharged Aug. 13, 1863.

FIELD AND STAFF. - Colonel, William W. Stott; lieutenant-colonel, George W. Arnold; major, Henry W. Petriken; adjutant, George E. Newlin; quartermaster, Edmund G. Harrison; surgeon Joseph W. Houston; assistant surgeons, William T. Potts, John Ward chaplain, William M. Scott; sergeant-major, Don Juan Wallings; quartermaster-sergeant, David A. Chandler; commissary-sergeants, Joseph L. Topham, James H. Naylor; hospital steward, Charles Cloud.

COMPANY F. - Captain, Charles A. Ulrich; first lieutenant, Edmund B. Nuss; second lieutenant, William W. Dalbey; first sergeant, William S. Evans; sergeants, John P. Armitage, John C. Donohoe, Reese Pass, James W. Harrison; corporals, Conrad Burke, Thomas Robinson, John S. Pipple, Isaac W. Cou1ston, John Flanigan, John F. Jones, Samuel Binns, Edmund Davis; musician, Abraham Harrison.

Privates. - William Adams, George Brown, John Binns, James Binns, James Begbie, Edward Bailey, William Carter, Joseph Golan, Booth Dusnop, Peter F. Davis, Charles Dorsey, Samuel Elliott, John P. Earl, Jacob Fisher, David Francis, Mathias Glenzinger, William Hopkins, William Hardstaf, William Harrison, Henry J. Harrold, Henry Hummell, Robert Hanney, Henry Jones, Nathan Jones, James Kenworthy, Andrew Knox, William Luney, Thomas J. Murry, John Murry, Robert McCurdey, John M. McMullen, John McFeaters, William Nuss, William Pollock, Hiram Parvin, Thomas Pass, William Reed, James Robinson, Alfred Robinson, Andrew E. Rodgers, George M. Rodgers, William Reeves, Robert Reeves, John Rayzor, Benjamin Smith, Robert Shoar, Robert Smith, William T. Steele, John Stevenson, Joseph Shaw, Henry Stemple, Samuel Townsend, Henry Townsend, Benjamin Vaughn, Robert White, John Woodward, Michael Walt.

COMPANY I. - Captains, George W. Arnold (promoted to lieutenant-colonel July 6, 1863), Joseph L. Allabough; first lieutenant, John C. Snyder; second lieutenant, Allen M. Boorse; first sergeant, Charles McCauley; sergeants, George Y. Hansel, Thomas G. Arnold, Charles W. Evans, E.R.W. Sickle; corporals, George B. Reuss, Griffith W. Jones, William H. Martin, Lewis J. Ambler, Thomas Cary, Isaac Nyce, Daniel S. Young, Samuel Swartley; musicians, Edward Malone, Howard Gordon.

Privates. - Edward H. Ambler, Henry G. Arnold, John A. Arnold, Moses Auge, Edward H. Auderson, Abner S. Boorse, Peter Borse, Joseph Brian, William Butterworth, William Coe, Henry H. Derstine, John H. Dager, Charles Dotterer, Hiram C. Dutterer, Israel Eaton, Richard Eaton, William H. Eastwood, David Eisenberry, Jesse Frederick, Joseph Gilbert, Jacob M. Godshalk, John Hughes, Joseph Harrop, Joseph Kriebel, David Krause, Charles M. Kulp, John M. Kulp, Charles W. Kirk, Jefferson Kepler, Henry Kinkinger, Isaac Landis, William Lansdale, Lewis Lambert, Daniel Lloyd, Isaac Mayberry, Lewis Murr, Peter Myers, George W. Moore, Hugh McClellan, John McGlinchy, George A. Newbold, William Nottingheim. Henry Nungesser; Marshall Pugh, Andrew T. Roberts, Jacob Stahley, David Simons, Abijah Stephens, Joseph L. Scott, William M. Scott (promoted to chaplain July 10, 1863), Joseph Stung, John Schleigel, Thomas Tippin, Morgan R. Wills, Charles West, Josiah Wentz, Benedict D. Wood, George Werkiser, William H. Yetter, John Yetter.

One Hundred and Ninety-seventh Regiment (hundred days' men).

197th Regiment - This regiment was recruited at Philadelphia and in neighboring counties by the assistance of the Coal Exchange Association of that city, to serve for a period of one hundred days, and was known as the Third Coal Exchange Regiment. It was organized at Camp Cadwalader on the 22nd of July, 1864, with the following field officers: John R. Haslett, colonel; Charles D. Kenworthy, lieutenant-colonel; John Woodcock, major. Colonel Haslett had served as captain in the Sixty-sixth and subsequently in the Seventy-third, of which he had been for several months the acting major; Lieutenant-Colonel Kenworthy had served on the Peninsula, in the Third United States Infantry, where he was severely wounded; and Major Woodcock had just been mustered out of a nine months' regiment. A large proportion of officers and men were well-schooled soldiers. Soon after its organization it proceeded to Camp Bradford, at Mankin's Woods, near Baltimore, where it remained for two weeks. At the end of that time, and when well drilled and in full expectation of being led to the front, it was ordered to Rock Island, Ill., and upon its arrival there was charged with guarding a camp for prisoners of war. The guard provided was insufficient for the duty required, and the service bore heavily upon this regiment. At the close of its term it returned to Philadelphia, where, on the 11th of November, 1864, it was mustered out.


COMPANY F.

Harry H. Shantz, capt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

E.M. Washburne, 1st lieutenant, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Fr'k W. Carpenter, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

George Scheetz, 1st sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Meigs, sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with comppny Nov. 11, 1864.

Owen Jones, sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Albert Gulden, sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

5amuel Yerkes, sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John H Hobert, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Mahlon V. Smith, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Maurice H. Kaighn, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Lessig, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Moses Wadsworth, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Albert W. Shick, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William J. Binder, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Ezra P. Clark, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Privates.

Charles B. Aiken, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Bickel, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Lewis Brombach, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Bernard Burns, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Zedekiah Bachman, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

David Burns, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Theodore Birch, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company. Nov 11, 1864.

Titus Burst, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Horace A. Custer, mustered in July, 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Edw. G. Carpenter, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William H. Croft, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Silas Crispin, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Noy. 11, 1864.

John Crawford, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov 11, 1864.

John Chadwick, mustered in July 18, 1864.

John Dengans, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Lewis L. Detweiler, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Deifendeifer, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov 11, 1864.

John Dikens, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Days, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Henry Eckhert, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Montgomery Erp, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John C. Ferris, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov 11, 1864.

Sylvester G. Fritz, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

George W. Forman, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with Company Nov. 11, 1864.

Samuel Faust, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Jacob Faber, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Albert H. Good, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

George Gross, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Albert Hazzard, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Hollabush, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John S. High, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

George H. Harley, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Jacob Hanf, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Harper, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Charles T. Hollowell, mustered in July 18, 1864; transferred to Co. G, 186th Regiment P.V., Sept. 8, 1864.

Isaac S. Harley, mustered in July 18, 1864; died at Rock Island, Ill., Oct. 2, 1864.

William Johnson, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Henry Johnson, mustered in July 18, 1864.

Newton S. Kinzer, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Chauncey Mitchell, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Merritt M. Missimer, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Moser, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Frederick McVaugh, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James A. McCall, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Thomas Ott, mustered in July 18, 1864 must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Peter D. Pertches, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Allen Pennypacker, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John F. Patterson, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Phipps, mustered in July 18, 1864; discharged by S.O. July 25, 1864.

Joseph Peterson, mustered in July 18, 1864; transferred Sept. 8, 1864, organization unknown.

William Raybold, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Peter Robb, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

B. Frank Shantz, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Harvey Skein, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Frank H. Smith, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

David P. Seipel, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

W. Steer, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Frederick Speck, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Alexander Taylor, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Charles Torrence, mustered in July 18, 1864; transferred to Co. G, 186th Regiment P.V., Sept 8, 1864.

Charles M. Thomas, mustered in July 18, 1864; transferred to Co. G, 186th Regiment P.V., Sept. 8, 1864.

Thomas Weller, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Milton S. Weand, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864

William Winter, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

George R. Weiley, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Joseph K Wells, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Yard, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Thomas H.B. Zulick, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Addison Zeigler, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.


COMPANY G.

John C. Snyder, capt., mustered in July 22, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Charles S. Jones, 1st lieutenant, mustered in July 22, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Wilmer Atkinson, 2nd lieutenant, mustered in July 22, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1854.

William F. Faust, 1st sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

George W. Fischer, sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

George W.H. Thomas, sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1865.

John A. Arnold, sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Isaac Templin, sergt., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Owen S. Lowry, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Edwin R.W. Seckel, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John V. Meckert, Corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Jacob T. Comly, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James S. Cassel, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, l864.

Frederick W. Horn, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Peter M. Boorse, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Evan Ambler, corp., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Privates.

Thomas M. Arnold, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Albert Atwood, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Albert Atkinson, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Stephen H. Abbott, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Franklin Bertolet, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John O. Boorse, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Richard Brown, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov 11, 1864.

Thomas J. Birkbeck, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Nathaniel J. Burnham, mustered in July 18, 1864; transferred to Co. E Aug. 1, 1864.

George W. Carr, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William H. Clark, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Dingee, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Daniel Dooley, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Jos H.. Eisenbrey, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James Eldridge, mustered in July 18, 1864; must out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

George C. Fithian, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Andrew Flammer, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Foreman, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Fulmer, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Nathaniel H. Gerhar4, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James Getty, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Griffith, mustered in July 18, 1864; transferred Sept 6, 1864, organization unknown.

Henry Gallagher, mustered in July 18, 1864.

Frank Hoagland, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Hattel, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Houck, mustered in July 18, 1864.

Benjamin Jones, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James H. Jones, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Dennis Keene, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov 11, 1864.

Henry Reeler, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Edmund J. Lehr, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Hor. H. Marquart, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Samuel H. Moore, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Samuel Morris, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William H.H. McCrea, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John McDonald, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Camil's McKinstry, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Nortenheim, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James O'Brien, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John O'Shay, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Thomas E. Palmer, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Ellwood Paxson, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James Peacock, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Judson Pugh, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Albert Reichman, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

I. Comly Rich, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

John Radly, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Charles P. Reets, Jr., mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Richard K. Roberts, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William H. Bountree, mustered in July 18, 1864; transferred to Co. B July 20 1864.

William Science, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William B. Seckel, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Benjamin Y. Shainline, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Isaac Shoemaker, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Frank Smith, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Stinson, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Washington Supplee, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

William Tracy, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Thomas Travis, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Henry Walker, mustered in July 18, 1864; discharged by S.O. Dec. 21, 1864.

John Weaver, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Charles Weber, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Enos Y. Wambold, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Henry W. Wentzel, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James Wilfong, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

James Wood, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

Frank Young, mustered in July 18, 1864; must. out with company Nov. 11, 1864.

RECAPITULATION OF COMPANIES ORGANIZED AND

ACCREDITED TO MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PA.

Fourth Regiment, Companies A, B, C, D, E, I, K, 90 days' term.

Fourty-fourth Regiment (First Pennsylvania Cavalry), Company B, 3 years' term.

Fifty-first Regiment, Companies A, C, D, F and I, 3 years' term.

Fifty-third Regiment, Companies A and B, 3 years' term.

Sixty-eighth Regiment, Company H.

Ninety-third Regiment, Company G, 3 years' term.

Ninety-fifth Regiment, 3 years' term.

One Hundred and Sixth Regiment, Company G, 3 years' term.

One hundred and Twenty-ninth Regiment, Company I, 9 months' term.

One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Regiment, Companies A, C, I and K, 3 years' term.

One Hundred and Sixtieth Regiment (Anderson Troop), 3 years' term.

One Hundred and Sixty-second Regiment, Company L (Seventeenth Pennsylvania Cavalry), 3 years' term.

One Hundred and Seventy-fifth Regiment, Companies A and H, 9 months' term.

One Hundred and Seventy-ninth Regiment, Companies A and G, 9 months' term.

INDEPENDENT CAVALRY COMPANIES.

Captain Samuel W. Comly's company, organized Sept. 15, 1862; discharged Sept. 26, 1862.

Captain Daniel H. Mulvany's company, organized Sept. 13, 1862; discharged Sept. 27, 1862.

Captain Samuel W. Comly's company, organized June 17, 1863; discharged July 30, 1863.

INDEPENDENT CAVALRY BATTALION.

Company B, Captain Frederick Haws, organized July 2, 1863; discharged August 21, 1863.

PENNSYLVANIA MILITIA.

Eleventh Regiment, Companies C, D, G and H.

Seventeenth Regiment, Companies B and G.

Nineteenth Regiment, Company B.

Twenty-sixth Regiment, Company F.

Thirty-fourth Regiment, Companies B, C, E, H, I.

Forty-first Regiment, Company B.

Forty-third Regiment, Company I.

One Hundred and Ninety-seventh Regiment (one hundred days' men). Companies F and G.

SIXTH REGIMENT NATIONAL GUARD OF PENNSYLVANIA.

Headquarters located at Norristown.

John W. Schall, colonel; Perry M. Washabaugh, lieutenant-colonel; Thomas C. Steele, major; Thomas J. Stewart, adjutant; Frank B. Rhoads, quartermaster; Jos, K. Weaver, M.D., surgeon; William J. Ashenfelter, M.D., John A. Fell, M.D., assistant surgeons; Clement Z. Weiser, D.D,, chaplain; Horace F. Temple, sergeant-major; Jacob B. Stauffer, commisary-sergeant; St. Julien Ozier quartermaster-sergeant; Huizinga C. Byers, hospital steward; L.D. Hyate, Charles H. Earl, principal musicians:

Company A. - Located at Pottstown. H.A. Shenton, captain; Horace Evans, first lieutenant; William E. Schuyler, second lieutenant.

Company C - Located at Conshohocken. William B. Nungesser, captain; Franklin Morrison, first lieutenant; George W. Royer, second lieutenant.

Company F. - Located at Norristown, Henry Jacobs, captain; Henry R. Souders, first lieutenant; Eugene R. Hartzell, second lieutenant.

NOTE. - There is a large number of deceased and surviving soldiers who enlisted from and were accredited to Montgomery County, but not attached to the company organizations of the county. The names, rank and services of these men are not so recorded in the official records of the war as to be obtained for historical purposes. We sincerely regret that they are omitted, and trust that some means will yet be taken to preserve their names and honorable service. The official records of the Grand Army of the Republic will furnish reference to a large number of the survivors of this meritorious class of soldiers, but it will not reach the cases of our dead comrades in arms who fell in battle or died in the prisons of the South during the conflict. Among the number who fall within this class was Captain John Kline, of Company H, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry. He was killed at Haws' Shop, Va., May 28, 1864, and his remains repose at Barren Hill Church under a monument dedicated to his memory by his patriotic friends of Whitemarsh and vicinity. Henry Rosenburg, Company K, Forty-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, died at Andersonville Prison, Ga., March 24, 1864. Captain Thomas A. Kelly, Company G, Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteers. Captain John W. Moore, Company G, Sixty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

* Organization of First Brigade Colonel W. B. Franklin, Third Division, Colonel S.P. Heintzelman (the three brigades of the division were commanded respectively by Colonels W.B. Franklin, O.O. Howard and O.B. Wilcox). - -Ricket's Battery of the First United States Artillery; Fifth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, Colonel Lawrence; Eleventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, Colonel Clark; First Regiment Minnesota Volunteers, Colonel Gorman; Fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Hartranft.

** ORIGINAL ROSTER OF THE CAVALRY CORPS A. OF P.

Brig. -Gen. George Stoneman.

FIRST DIVISION.

Brig.-Gen. Alfred Pleasanton.

First Brigade (Col. Benjamin F. Davis). - 8th Illinois, 3rd Indiana, 8th New York, 9th New York.

Second Brigade (Col. Thomas C. Devin). - 1st Michigan (Co. L), 6th New York, 8th Pennsylvania, 17th Pennsylvania.

Artillery. - New York Lt. Art., 6th Bat'y.

SECOND DIVISION.

Brig.-Gen. William W. Averell.

First Brigade (Col. Horace B. Sargent). - 1st Massachusetts, 4th New York, 6th Ohio, 1st Rhode Island.

Second Brigade (Col. John B. Mclntosh). - 3d Pennsylvania, 4th Pennsylvania, 16th Pennsylvania.

Artillery. - 2nd U.S. Artillery, Battery A.

THIRD DIVISION.

Brig.- Gen. David McM. Gregg.

First Brigade (Col. Judson Kilpatrick). - 1st Maine, 2nd New York, 10th New York.

Second Brigade (Col. Percy Wyndham). - l2th Illinois, 1st Maryland, 1st New Jersey, 1st Pennsylvania.

Regular Reserve Cavalry Brigade (Brig.-Gen. John Buford.). - 6th Pennsylvania, 1st United States, 2nd United States, 5th United States, 6th United States.

Artillery (Capt. John M. Robertson). - 2nd U.S. Artillery, BattMontgomerys B and L; 2nd U.S. Artillery, Battery M; 4th U.S. Artillery, Battery E.

*** Organization of time Second Brigade (Brigadier-General Jesse L. Reno, of Burnside's Corps). - Fifty-first Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel John F. Hartranft; Fifty-first Regiment New York Volunteers, Colonel Robert B. Potter; Twenty-first Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Albert C. Maggi; Ninth Regiment New Jersey Volunteers, Colonel J.W. Allen.

(4*) General Reno's official report.

(*****) General Cox's Official Report, Moore's "Rebellion Record," Does. vol. v. p. 454 -455

(6*)
"After crossing the bridge I took the regiment to the right and halted. When the regiment was re-formed I moved it from the bed of the road towards the creek, and rested while several other regiments passed up the road. Colonel Bell here came up to me, saying that more troops should be sent over. I replied, 'Well, go and see about it.' He went, but no farther than the bridge, and soon I saw him coming back on the bed of the road (which was now clear of troops), a few feet from the edge of the road nearest the water. When about thirty yards from the bridge I saw him struck on the left temple, as I at that time thought and now believe, by a canister shot. He fell backward and rolled off the road to within six feet of the water. He spoke freely, saying 'Never say die, boys;' 'Stand by the colors;' 'Take care of my sword.' He was immediately taken back to the Barn Hospital and examined by some surgeon (our own surgeons being at another hospital), who pronounced his 'wound not dangerous. Bleeding soon stopped. I directed Sergeant-Major Stoneroad to remain with him and take charge of his effects. I was under orders at this time to move forward, and could not leave the regiment. In little less than an hour after I received permission to go back to the hospital to see the colonel. I saw him (sergeant-major with him), but he did not recognize me. In an hour after he passed off calmly."
- Letter of General Hartranft.

(7*)
"All night Sherman heard the sound of wagons, but nothing that indicated evacuation, for the picks and shovels were at work till midnight; but at the dawn of day it became evident that the enemy had withdrawn across the Pearl River. The rebels had burned all the bridges in retreating and placed loaded shells and torpedoes on the roads leading out from the river. All the materials of war had been removed, in advance of the retreat, by means of the railroad running east."
- "Military History of U.S. Grant," Badeau, vol. i. p. 396.

(8*)Organization of the Third Brigade (Brigadier-General William H. French), First Division (Major-General Israel B. Richardson), Second Corps (Major-General E.V. Sumner). - Fifty.ihird Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel John B. Brooke; Fifty-second Regiment New York Volunteers, Colonel Frank Paul; Fifty-seventh Regiment New York Volunteers, Colonel Samuel K. Zook; Sixty-sixth Regiment New York Volunteers, Colonel James C. Pinckney; Second Regiment Delaware Volunteers, Colonel Henry W. Wharton; Battery B, First New York Artillery, Captain Rufus B. Pettit.

(9*) Organization of First Brigade (Brigadier-General Robinson), First

Division (Brigadier-General David B. Birney), Third Corps (Major General Stoneman). - Twentieth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Colonel John Van Valkenburg; Sixty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel John A. Banks; Sixty-eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Andrew H. Tippin; One Hundred and Fourteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Charles H.T. Collis; One Hundred and Forty-first Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Henry J. Madill.

(10*)" The brigade," says Colonel Tippin, "was under my command. Among the prisoners were Lieutenant General Ewell, Major-Generals Custis Lee, Kershaw and other prominent generals of the rebel army, together with about six hundred officers of lesser grade. At a point on the route where we all rested for a short time, I received a dispatch that General Lee had surrendered. I communicated the intelligence to Generals Ewell and Custis Lee, but both doubted its truthfulness. They could not think it possible. In a very short time, and before leaving our resting-place, General Benham came up with his engineer brigade, and gave the terms of the surrender. Young General Lee dropped his head on his breast, and General Ewell threw up his arms, exclaiming, 'The jig is up.'"

(11*) See Bates' "Hist. Pa. Vols.," vol. iii. p. 284.

(12*) Organization of Philadelphia Brigade, Colonel E.D. Baker (division commanded by Brigadier-General Charles P. Stone), army of General Bank -Seventy-fifth (California) Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel E.D. Baker; Seventy-second (Fire Zouaves) Regiment Volunteers, Colonel De Witt C. Baxter; Sixty-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Joshua T. Owen; One Hundred and Sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Turner G. Morehead.

(13*) Moore's "Rebellion Record," vol. v. p. 91, Docs.

(14*) Moore's "Rebellion Record," vol. v. p. 245, Docs.

(1*****) Towards the middle of January an order was issued through division headquarters requiring the men to draw dress coats. As they had warm underclothing, and had just been provided with two blouses per man, the dress coat did not seem to be needed. It would only be an incumnbrance and a needless expense, and, moreover, their term of service would shortly expire. The officers sought to have their regiment relieved from the operations of the order; but in this they were unsuccessful, and upon their refusal to obey the order, the colonel and lieutenant-colonel were summarily tried and dismissed from the service. They were, however, soon after reinstated and restored to their commands, the general officers who had preferred charges against them testifying upon their trial to their fidelity and gallantry.

(16*) The facts embraced in this narrative are principally drawn from a neat volume of one hundred and thirty-eight pages, prepared by Osceola Lewis, and printed by Wills, Iredell & Jenkins, of Norristown, Pa.

(17*) "Two men of Company F penetrated the country as far as the South Side Railroad, and tore up some of the track. While engaged in this work they encountered two rebel mounted officers, who demanded their surrender. Corporal John W. Mauk immediately shot one of the officers, and Private Wolford fired at the other, but missed, and the rebel escaped. The men then came back to the regiment and reported their adventure. It is supposed that the officer killed by Corporal Mauk was the rebel General A.P. Hill, as various reports give the circumstances of his death as similar to those of this case." - Colonel McClennan's Official Report.

(18*) "The Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry (One Hundred and Sixtieth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers) was recruited by officers of the Anderson Troop, a company named after General Robert Anderson, the hero of Fort Sumter, which had been in service under General Buell.

"In the summer of 1862, Captain William I. Palmer, assisted by Ward, Verzin, Seeger and others of the old Anderson Troop, opened recruiting offices at Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and other points throughout the State.

"A peculiar feature at the recruiting station in Philadelphia (corner Third and Willing's Alley) was the requirement that recruits for the Fifteenth should furnish recommendations as to character, etc.

"It was stated at headquarters that the regiment was intended for special duty under General Buell, who was then in command of the gallant and successful Army of the Southwest.

"Applicants were numerous, and some of the best material of the State was thus secured.

"The men were measured for their uniforms at Rockhill & Wilson's Chestnut Street clothing-house, and purchased their heavy cavalry boots of Dickerman, Philadelphia.

"It was originally intended to increase the old troop to a battalion only, and it has been frequently urged that no sufficient authority was given for a greater number, but a full regiment was enlisted and placed in active service.

"The men were taken in detachments to Carlisle Barracks, in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and were drilled there by officers of the regular army, on duty at the barracks.

"It is asserted that there was some conflict as to the regiment between the War Department and the State authorities.

"At all events, there was some hitch or hindrance at some important point which resulted in trouble to officers and men, and occasioned considerable irregularity in the organization and equipment of the regiment.

"Acting Colonel Palmer was captured at Antietam, and was afterward succeeded in temporary command by Acting Lieutenant-Colonel Spencer.

"The officers, however, were only temporary, and orders were issued as mere 'temporary arrangements.' Men not above the grade of sergeants were in command of companies, while the men of the regiment had no voice in the selection of their non-commissioned or other officers.

"In this unfortunate condition, without equipment, without commissioned officers, and apparently without remedy, all efforts to secure a change proving ineffectual, - a condition which naturally tends to produce demoralization and frequently leads to insubordination in any service, military or civil, - the regiment was, on short notice, hurried out of the grand old commonwealth of Pennsylvania, by Acting Lieutenant Colonel Spencer, to Louisville, Kentucky, and from thence, wretchedly mounted and inefficiently equipped, to Nashville, Tennessee, whence, in a day or two, they were marched to the front, and under General Stanley, chief of cavalry of General Rosecrans, had the extreme advance at the battle of Murfreesboro'.

The loss to the regiment in that battle was heavy. After the death of the gallant Majors Ward and Rosengarten and of the heroic Kimbes, General Stanley said, in a voice that rang like a trumpet:

" 'I will take command of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania.' With that he drew his sword, shouted the command, 'Draw sabre Charge! Follow me !'It was gallantly done and the regiment marched upon the foe.

"But alas! many of the brave and brilliant men of the Fifteenth, whose genius, dash and courage gave promise of distinguished and eminent service to the government were slain or crippled for life on that bloody field in the memorable Christmas holidays of 1862.

"The great delays in properly organizing the regiment and the lack of suitable supplies and equipments had culminated in widespread dissatisfaction, and troubles arose which for a time seriously threatened the organization.

"These, however, were afterwards happily adjusted.

"After the reorganization Orderly Sergeant Charles M. Betts rose rapidly to the colonelcy of the regiment, and its subsequent fine career under his efficient command was due in a great measure to his noble qualities as an officer and gentleman.

"ALEXANDER R. CUTLER,

"Late Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry." 


(19*)Under the call, Pennsylvania was required to furnish three regiments of cavalry. The Sixteenth, Seventeenth and Eighteenth were organized. (See Bates' History, vol. iv. pp. 950, 1001, 1043).

(20*) There was an incident connected with the regimental organization which had such an important relation to its subsequent history that it deserves to be preserved. The election of field and staff officers was effected after an active canvass, and the choice made was accepted by all with great satisfaction. The roster was made up of colonel, lieutenant -colonel, three majors, adjutant, quartermaster and commissary. All vacancies in the companies occasioned by promotion to the field and staff were filled, and the papers at once forwarded to Governor Curtin for appointments and commissions. Upon the receipt of the roster at the executive office, the Governor carefully examined the same, and directed a reply to be sent to the officers of the regiment that he would appoint and commission all the officers named except the colonel, Daniel M. Doneho, who had been captain of Company A. It should be added that none of the field or staff officer's elected had experienced active service except Reuben Reinhold, the second major. The Governor's communication was couched in the most respectful terms, and his refusal to appoint and commission Capt. Donehoo colonel was based solely upon the fact of this officer's want of knowledge and experience for such a responsible position. The Governor's refusal created quite a breeze among the officers, and es pecially the admirers and personal friends of Colonel Donehoo. Some of the hasty and impulsive gave vent to their indignation in terms more vigorous than polite, and other's hinted at resignation. These "camp growls" found their way to the Governor's ear, and he was prompt in inviting a conference with all the commissioned officers. The day and hour were appointed; prompt to time the field, staff and line officers to the number of forty-four marched into the executive chamber, and received a cordial welcome. There were present his Adjutant General Russel and Brigadier-General Andrew Porter, of the United States army. The latter officer had been especially requested to be present and make a statement to the officers upon the subject of the interview. We regret that no COPY of the remarks of the Governor and General Porter was preserved, but in substance the former said:
"Gentlemen, I have invited this interview to fully and freely explain to each of you why I have refused to appoint and commission the gentleman you have elected as your commanding officer. I have no doubt of his patriotism or personal bravery, but I am informed that he has never been under fire nor had any experience in commanding troops in active service. I have been sadly admonished of my own mistake in appointing inexperienced and untried men as commanding officers of regiments, which has resulted in the unnecessary sacrifice of hundreds of gallant Pennsylvanians. In the first days and months of the war this may have been unavoidable, but now we have officers who have been trained for the profession of arms, natives of our own State, officers of experience, many of whom have been especially commended by their superior officers for distinguished conduct and capability in active service. And I have thoughtfully made up my official mind that I ought not, and therefore will not, appoint any man colonel of a new regiment about to enter the service for the period of three years who has not given the country some practical evidence of his fitness for the responsible office."


His manner indicated not less than his words his sincerity and determination, and when he had briefly stated his reasons he addressed General Porter, who was standing at his side, and requested him to advise the visiting officers upon the subject under consideration. The commanding presence of this distinguished officer, who was in full dress uniform, his age and pleasing address, and his words of wisdom resulting from many years of public service in the then impending and prior wars, induced the most respectful attention of every officer present. The possible and probable duration of the conflict between the North and South was referred to in such a manner as to dissipate all hope of a speedy end, however much it might be desired. He spoke of the several disasters to the Union arms, due to the incompetency of inexperienced field officers, and of the almost irretrievable disgrace which associates itself with the history of a regimental organization that suffers reverses, resulting from the incapability of its commanding officer. He impressed the importance of these considerations upon those present, and supported the Governor, especially because the cavalry arm of the service was then about to be brought to its highest uses, and concluded his advice by saying that it required greater skill to successfully command and direct the movements of a full regiment of cavalry in active service than a brigade of infantry, that they covered more ground in their formations, were more likely to be thrown into confusion and more difficult to withdraw in the hour of peril. The interview closed with a presentation of all the officers to the Governor and General Porter, and a free exchange of congratulations upon the first lessons of duty to our country, Captain Donehoo retired with the respect of his fellow-officer's, and the Governor presented the names of a number of officers then in the service, all of whom were graduates of the United States Military Academy, and were Pennsylvanians by birth or residence, After some Jars of deliberation and inquiry, Josiah H. Kellogg, then captain of First Regiment United States Cavalry, was selected. The following facts will serve to illustrate the attachment of Governor Curtin to the volunteer troops of Pennsylvania, During the winter of 1862 -63, and after the regiment had joined the array of the Potomac, the work of officers fitting themselves to intelligently perform their duties was rigidly insisted upon by Colonel Kellogg, Officers' school was instituted, and gentlemen were given to understand that unless they became proficient in the manual of arms and in the practical knowledge and execution of all necessary commands, and prompt in all the necessary duties of officers, they would be at once reported to the standing board of examiners. This was eminently proper, but seriously effected fully fifty per cent. of the field and line officers, who were brave men and willing to serve their country, but disinclined to apply themselves to study. The tasks were this tasteful, recitations unsatisfactory and the commanding officer uncompromising. Resignations followed; the young and bright men of the regiment were promoted. At this time a vacancy occurred on the staff of the colonel, Lieutenant Henry M. Dommehoo, commissary, was promoted to captain Company B, and it was learned the colonel had recommended for the office a sergeant from his old command, First United States Cavalry, and that the recommendation was then in the hands of Governor Curtin for commision. John P. Ross was at the time regimental commissary sergeant, and by rank entitled to the promotion. He at once presented his case to Governor Curtin, supported by a majority of commissioned officers of the regiment. The Governom, upon receipt of the sergeants application, recalled the appointment recommended by Colonel Kellogg, and forwarded the Commission of first lieutenant and commissary to John P. Ross. No further efforts were made by the commanding officer to import a foreign element into the staff, field or line of the regiment.

(21*) JOSIAH H. KELLOGG, appointed cadet at the United States Military

Academy from Pennsylvania, July 1, 1855; graduated July 1, 1860

assigned to duty as brevet second lieutenant of dragoons July 1, 1860; served at time cavalry school for practice, Carlisle, Pa., 1860 -61 promoted second lieutenant First Dragoons January 8, 18G1; first lieutenant May 13, 1861; captain First Cavalry May 20, 1862; served through the Peninsular campaign and the Maryland campaign, and was appointed colonel Seventeenth Pennsylvania Cavalry Volunteers, November 10, 1862; breveted major July 3, 1863, for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa.; resigned volunteer commission December 27, 1864; on duty at the United States Military Academy as assistant professor of national and experimental philosophy, February 22, 1865, to August 23, 1866; "retired from active service February 6, 1865, for disability resulting from long and faithful service and disease contracted in the line of duty; "professor of civil engineering and military tactics at Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N.J., August 30, 1860, by time authority of the law of July 28, 1866.

(22*) Conduct of the War," 1865, vol. i. pp. 28, 29.

(23*) "Conduct of the War," Supplement, part 2, p. 9., Pleasanton's Report.

(24*) Early on the 18th of October, Major Spera, in command of a detachment of the Seventeenth Cavalry, while at Martinsburg, whither he had been sent on the previous day, was ordered to report to Major Forsythe, of General Sheridan's staff, then at Martinsburg, and was directed by him to hold his command in readiness to escort Major-General Sheridan, in company with Colonels Thorn and Alexander, to the front. The column left Martinsburg at nine A.M., arrived at Winchester at three P. M., General Sheridan stopping at post headquarters, Colonel Edwards, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts, commanding. The escort encamped for the night at Mill Creek, a mile south of the town, with orders to be in readiness to move at five on the following morning. Very early in the morning rapid artillery firing was heard in the direction of the front. At about eight A.M. General Sheridan came riding leisurely along, remarking that the artillery firing was no doubt occasioned by a reconnaissance which had been ordered for that morning. Shortly after passing Milltown fugitives from the field began to appear, giving another interpretation of the firing of the morning. All trains going to and returning from the front were at once ordered to be parked to the right and left of the road near Milltown. General Sheridan then ordered Major Spera to take twenty men with the best horses from the escort and follow him, as he was going to "move lively" to the front, the remainder of the escort being directed to report to General Forsythe, and Colonels Thorn and Alexander to do "what they could in stemming the tide of fugitives." On the way up the pike towards Newtown the crowds of men and wagons thickened, until the multitude became almost a jam, so much so that it was impossible to keep the pike, and General Sheridan struck to the left of the road, dashing through fields and over fences and ditches. He spoke to few, occasionally crying out,
"Face the other way, boys!"
A chaplain was met mounted on a mule, who seemed importunate to speak with the general, and beckoned him to stop; but the general told him to face about and ride along if he had anything to say. But the mule-mounted chaplain was soon left behind with his story untold. On arriving upon the field the general struck to the right of the road, where were Generals Wright, Getty and members of his own staff, one of whom remarked
"General, I suppose Jubal Early intends driving you out of the valley."
"What!"
exclaimed Sheridan,
"drive me out of the valley, three corps of infantry and all my cavalry? I'll lick him before night."
With a lion heart he set to work disposing his forces, and by nightfall he had redeemed his promise.

(2*****) The following correspondence between Captain Daniel H. Mulvany and Governor Curtin recalls the period of anxiety and apprehension felt throughout Eastern Pennsylvania in the summer of 1863. It also shows the promptness with which the patriotic citizens of Montgomery County responded to the call of the executive in an emergency that was rife with peril to the commonwealth

"HARRISBURG, June 15, 1863.

"Received June 15, 1863, 10 o'clock, 30 minutes A.M.

"To D. Mulvany, Esq. - Lee is moving in force on Pennsylvania. He has defeated our forces at Winchester and Martinsburg, and part of his army is now at Hagerstown. The President has called on Pennsylvania for fifty thousand volunteers to check the Rebel movement, the men so raised to serve for six months if not sooner discharged, to be clothed and paid by the United States, and to be accredited on the draft. Unless our people respond promptly a large part of the State will be laid waste by the Rebel invasion.

(Signature),
"A.G. CURTIN,
"Gov. State Pennsylvania." 


Also the following letter:

NORRISTOWN, Sept. 16, 1862.

"His Excellency, A.G. Curtin, Gov. of Penna. - SIR: I have the honor to report the troop of cavalry raised in this borough and vicinity as in readiness to march. We propose to mount our horses for Harrisburg on Thursday morning next. Please have the goodness to let me know by telegraph whether we may go at that time. Very respectfully your obedient servant.

"D.H. MULVANY,

Captain Norristown Troop.

"P.S. - Fifty-four members have positively agreed to march on Thursday, and some others would go to Harrisburg to join us in a few days."


The above is appended to a paper drawn up in the following terms:

"We, the undersigned citizens of Norristown and its vicinity, between 18 and 55 years of age, do hereby agree to form ourselves into a troop of cavalry, for such military service as the defense of our native State may in the present emergency require. The members will meet to organize at the office of D.H. Mulvany on Saturday next, at 7.30 o'clock p.m."


(26*) The following extract from a letter written by an emergency soldier of the summer of 1863 will call to mind the circumstances which at that period were deemed of unusual interest to the people of Montgomery County

"At the time General Lee with his rebel hordes crossed the Potomac and was about to invade the soil of Pennsylvania the people of the Schuylkill Valley became very much alarmed. It was difficult to realize the fact that after the State had given over two hundred thousand of her brave young men to the public service that she should be the subject of an incursion, and her great harvest-fields devastated and whole regions laid waste. The farmers and business men of Montgomery County felt the emergency to be serious, and that more soldiers were necessary in order to resist the tide of invasion, and it possible to overwhelm Lee; we therefore, in a very few days, raised a company, known as the Norris Cavalry, and selected for our captain Frederick Haws, of Norriton township. The farmers had the hay about half made and the grain was nearly ready to harvest; but we thought better, if needs be, to lose our crops and march to the assistance of the brave men in the field. The sacrifice was felt to be very great, and the animating feeling of all was to do what we could for the country. On the 2nd of July, 1863, a warm sultry morning, we left our homes and farms and assembled at Norristown, where we received our horses and equipments. At 10 o'clock A.M. we formed company and started for the seat of war. We marched over the Ridge pike, passing through village after village, and receiving the plaudits of men, women and children, all of whom seemed to feel the stern necessities of the time; we reached Pottstown, and there remained overnight, and were hospitably entertained by the good citizens of that place; many of the men felt jolted and sore, and keenly appreciated a short night's rest. By seven o'clock on the morning of the 3d we were on the march for Reading, reaching that place in good time; horses were groomed and the men turned in for a good night's sleep. On the morning of July 4th we were mustered into the State service for three months, unless sooner discharged; we then went into camp, and suffered all the discomforts of a rainy afternoon and night. The joyful news of the defeat of Lee came along in good time to rejoice our hearts, and in common with all, we felt a sense of relief and a desire to be where we could help to push things. On the 5th we had our horses appraised and then took cars and proceeded to Harrisburg. The rain continued, and the conditions under which we marched to a piece of woodland beyond the town and went into camp were such as to induce 'camp growls' from the most patriotic. 'Camp Couch,' however, was established and Norris Cavalry pitched their tents, fed their horses, cooked their coffee, made their beds, began to realize what 'soldiering' really meant, 'turned in' for the night, dreamed of soft beds, new-made hay, and orange harvest-field and not the girls, but the kindly housewives we left behind us. We woke to the sound of neighing horses and the general racket of rain-soaked camp guards. At this camp we received our uniforms. As usual, they fit to a fault, and many of us, upon getting inside of them, felt almost as blue as we looked. The novelty of our woodland camp was wearing away and the situation was growing monotonous, when, on the 11th, we received orders to march. Our first duty was to take one hundred government horses to Chambersburg; this we did, and turned them over to officers there in command, and then moved on to Greencastle, where we encamped for the night. Next day we marched to a place called Clear Springs, in Washington County, Maryland, and encamped within about one and a half miles of the Potomac River. We were now in General Kelly's department, Camp Stahl. Here we were employed for some time in doing out-post and picket duty on the Potomac River. Lee having retired into Virginia, the danger to the State being over and our affairs at home pressing most of the men in the command, we returned to Harrisburg. On August 21st we were mustered out, and on the following day returned to our homes. Our experience was rife with incident, and although we were not engaged with the enemy, our presence on the line of operations was a guarantee of our willingness to do what the exigencies of the public service and those in charge of it might require of us at their hands.










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