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PA Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients

The Medal of Honor, established by joint resolution of Congress, 12 July 1862 is awarded in the name of Congress to a person who, while a member of the Armed Services, distinguishes himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. The deed performed must have been one of personal bravery or self-sacrifice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his comrades and must have involved risk of life. Incontestable proof of the performance of service is exacted and each recommendation for award of this decoration is considered on the standard of extraordinary merit. A large percent of Medal of Honor recipients were awarded for action involving flags.

Unknown Counties


NOTE: An asterisk (*) denotes a posthumous award.



HOMETOWN OR COUNTY UNKNOWN

MEDALS ACCREDITED TO PENNSYLVANIA & MEDALS WON BY MEMBERS OF PENNSYLVANIA UNITS

CLARK, WILLIAM A.L: Corporal, Company H, 2nd Minnesota Infantry. Nolensville, Tenn., 15 February 1863. Citation: 11 September 1897. Was one of a detachment of 16 men who heroically defended a wagon train against the attack of 125 cavalry, repulsed the attack and saved the train.

CLlFFORD, ROBERT T.: Master-at-Arms, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Shokokon, Wilmington, NC, 22 August 1863. Citation: 31 December 1864. Served on board the U.S.S. Shokokon at New Topsail Inlet off Wilmington, N.C., 22 August 1863. Participating in a strategic plan to destroy an enemy schooner, Clifford aided in the portage of a dinghy across the narrow neck of land separating the sea from the sound. Launching the boat in the sound, the crew approached the enemy from the rear and Clifford gallantly crept into the rebel camp and counted the men who outnumbered his party three to one. Returning to his men, he ordered a charge in which the enemy was routed, leaving behind a schooner and a quantity of supplies.

CONNOR, WILLIAM C.: Boatswain's Mate, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Howquah, 25 September 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. Served on board the U.S.S. Howquah on the occasion of the destruction of the blockade runner Lynx, off Wilmington, 25 September 1864. Performing his duty faithfully under the most trying circumstances, Connor stood firmly at his post in the midst of a crossfire from the rebel shore batteries and our own vessels.

CRAWFORD, ALEXANDER: Fireman, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Wyalusing, 25 May 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. On board the U.S.S. Wyalusing, Crawford volunteered 25 May 1864, in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in the Roanoke River. Taking part in a plan to explode the rebel ram Albemarle, Crawford executed his part in the plan with perfection, but upon being discovered, was forced to abandon the plan and retire leaving no trace of the evidence. After spending two hazardous days and nights without food, he gained the safety of a friendly ship and was then transferred back to the Wyalusing. Though the plan failed his skill and courage in preventing detection were an example of unfailing devotion to duty.

FISHER, JOHN H.: Monmouth, unknown County, First Lieutenant, Company B, 55th Illinois Infantry. Vicksburg, Miss., 22 May 1863. Citation: 2 September 1893. Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party."

HOFFMAN, THOMAS W.: Perrysburg, Pa., unknown County. Captain, Company A, 208th Pennsylvania Infantry. Petersburg, Va., 2 April 1865. Citation: 19 July 1895. Prevented a retreat of his regiment during the battle.

HYATT, THEODORE: First Sergeant, Company D, 127th Illinois Infantry. Vicksburg, Miss., 22 May 1863. Citation: 9 July 1894. Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party. (2/20/00 - Courtesy of Harry Lamb) The Medal Of Honor Historical Society reports that the remains Theodore Hyatt were moved from Lockport,Illinois to the new Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery at Elwood, Illinois."

LAWSON, JOHN: Landsman, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Hartford at Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. On board the flagship U.S.S. Hartford during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Wounded in the leg and thrown violently against the side of the ship when an enemy shell killed or wounded the six-man crew as the shell whipped on the berth deck, Lawson, upon regaining his composure, promptly returned to his station and, although urged to go below for treatment, steadfastly continued his duties throughout the remainder of the action.

MAY, WILLIAM: Private, Company H, 32nd lowa Infantry. Nashville, Tenn., 16 December 1864. Citation: 24 February 1865. Ran ahead of his regiment over the enemy's works and captured from its bearer the flag of Bonanchad's Confederate battery (C.S.A.).

McWlLLlAMS, GEORGE W.: Landsman, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Pontoosuc at Fort Fisher and Wilmington NC, 24 December 1864 to 22 February 1865. Citation: 22 June 1865. Served on board the U.S.S. Pontoosuc during the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, 24 December 1864, to 22 February 1865. Carrying out his duties faithfully throughout this period, McWilliams was so severely wounded in the assault upon Fort Fisher that he was sent to the hospital at Portsmouth, Va. McWilliams was recommended for his gallantry, skill and coolness in action while under the fire of the enemy.

MERRIFIELD, JAMES K.: Corporal, Company C, 88th Illinois Infantry. Franklin, Tenn., 30 November 1864. Citation: 28 March 1896. Captured two battle flags from the enemy and returned with them to his own lines.

TANNER, CHARLES B.: Second Lieutenant, Company H, 1st Delaware Infantry. Antietam, Md., 17 September 1862. Citation: 13 December 1889. Carried off the regimental colors, which had fallen within 20 yards of the enemy's lines, the color guard of nine men having all been killed or wounded; was himself three times wounded.

WILLIAMS, JOHN: Seaman, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Commodore Perry at Franklin, Va. 3 October 1862. Citation: 3 April 1863. On board the U.S.S. Commodore Perry in the attack upon Franklin, Va., 3 October 1862. With enemy fire raking the deck of his ship and blockades thwarting her progress, Williams remained at his post and performed his duties with skill and courage as the Commodore Perry fought a gallant battle to silence many rebel batteries as she steamed down the Blackwater River.

BALDWIN, CHARLES: Accredited to Pennsylvania: Born in Delaware. Coal Heaver, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Wyalusing, Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. Serving on board the U.S.S. Wyalusing and participating in a plan to destroy the rebel ram Albermarle in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Volunteering for the hazardous mission, C.H. Baldwin participated in the transfer of 2 torpedoes across an island swamp. Weighted by a line which was used to transfer the torpedoes, he swam the river and, when challenged by a sentry, was forced to abandon the plan after erasing its detection and before it could be carried to completion. Escaping the fire of the muskets, C.H. Baldwin spent two days and nights of hazardous travel without food, and finally arrived, fatigued, at the mother ship.

ANDERSON, EVERETT W.: Serving with Pennsylvania Unit. Born in Louisiana. Sergeant, Company M, 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Crosby's Creek, Tenn., 14 January 1864. Citation: 3 December 1894. Captured, single-handed, Confederate Brig. Gen. Robert B. Vance during a charge upon the enemy.

BEYER, HILLARY: Second Lieutenant, Company H, 90th Pennsylvania Infantry. Antietam, Md., 17 September 1862. Citation: 30 October 1896. After his command had been forced to fall back, remained alone on the line of battle, caring for his wounded comrades and carrying one of them to a place of safety.

BONNAFFON, SYLVESTER, JR.: First Lieutenant, Company G, 99th Pennsylvania Infantry. Boynton Plank Road, Va., 27 October 1864. Citation: 29 September 1893. Checked the rout and rallied the troops of his command in the face of a terrible fire of musketry; was severely wounded.

BREYER, CHARLES: Sergeant, Company I, 90th Pennsylvania Infantry. Rappahannock Station, Va., 23 August 1862. Citation: 8 July 1896. Voluntarily, and at great personal risk, picked up an unexploded shell and threw it away, thus doubtless saving the life of a comrade whose arm had been taken off by the same shell.

BUTTERFIELD, DANIEL: Born at Utica, NY. Commanded Pennsylvania troops. Wrote "Taps" using last five bars of French Bugle Call "Tattoo." The "Taps" melody was played for the first time by O.W. Norton of the 83rd Pennsylvania Volunteers on July 2, 1862. Brigadier General, U.S. Volunteers. Gaines Mill, Va., 27 June 1862. Citation: 26 September 1892. Seized the colors of the 83rd Pennsylvania Volunteers at a critical moment and, under a galling fire of the enemy, encouraged the depleted ranks to renewed exertion.

DAY, CHARLES: Born in Otsego County, NY. Private, Company K, 210th Pennsylvania Infantry.. Hatchers Run, Va., 6 February 1865. Citation: 20 July 1897. Seized the colors of another regiment of the brigade, the regiment having been thrown into confusion and the color bearer killed, and bore said colors throughout the remainder of the engagement.

DEAKIN, CHARLES: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in New York, NY. Boatswain's Mate, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Richmond in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. As captain of a gun on board the U.S.S. Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Deakin fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2 hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan. He also participated in the actions at Forts Jackson and St. Philip.

DE LAVIE, HIRAM H.: Born in Stark County, Ohio. Sergeant, Company I, 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Five Forks, Va., 1 April 1865. Citation: 10 May 1865. Capture of flag.

DEMPSTER, JOHN: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Scotland. Coxswain, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS New Ironsides at Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864 and 13, 14, and 15 January 1865. Citation: 22 June 1865. Dempster served on board the U.S.S. New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864; and 13, 14, and 15 January 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first 2 days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 January, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease fire orders were given by the flagship.

DOOLEN, WILLIAM: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Ireland. Coal Heaver, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Richmond in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. On board the U.S.S. Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Although knocked down and seriously wounded in the head, Doolen refused to leave his station as shot and shell passed. Calm and courageous, he rendered gallant service throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the successful attacks carried out on Fort Morgan despite the enemy's heavy return fire.

FRY, ISAAC N.: Orderly Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Aboard USS Ticonderoga at Fort Fisher 13 to 15 January 1865. Citation: On board the U.S.S. Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher, 13 to 15 January 1865. As orderly sergeant of marine guard, and captain of a gun, Orderly Sgt. Fry performed his duties with skill and courage as the Ticonderoga maintained a well placed fire upon the batteries to the left of the palisades during the initial phases of the three day battle, and thereafter, as she considerably lessened the firing power of guns on the mount which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

FUNK, WEST: Born in Boston, Mass. Major, 121st Pennsylvania Infantry. Appomattox Courthouse, Va., 9 April 1865. Citation: 15 October 1872. Capture of flag of 46th Virginia Infantry (C.S.A.).

FURNESS, FRANK: Born November 12, 1839: Died June 27, 1912. Captain, Company F, 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Trevilian Station, Va., 12 June 1864. Citation: 20 October 1899. Voluntarily carrier a box of ammunition across an open space swept by the enemy's fire to the relief of an outpost whose ammunition had become almost exhausted, but which was thus enabled to hold its important position. Furness refused his Congressional Medal of Honor, but later accepted it just before his death in 1912. A well known Philadelphia architect between 1870 and 1900, Furness designed banks, churches and synagoges, as well as rail stations for the Pennsylvania and Baltimore & Ohio railroads. His works included mansions, mostly stone, for the wealthy in and around the Philadelphia's "Main Line." Furness studied architecture in France when the war ended, and he designed Philadelphia's Academy of Fine Arts located at North Broad Street at Cherry Street in Phila. He is buried in the Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia, Pa, in Section "S."

GRACE, PETER: Born at Berkshire, Mass. Sergeant, Company G, 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry.. Wilderness, Va., 5 May 1864. Citation: 27 December 1894. Singlehanded, rescued a comrade from two Confederate guards, knocking down one and compelling surrender of the other.

HART, JOHN W.: Born in Germany. Sergeant, Company D, 6th Pennsylvania Reserves. Gettysburg, P., 2 July 1863. Citation: 3 August 1897. Was one of six volunteers who charged upon a log house near the Devil's Den, where a squad of the enemy's sharpshooters were sheltered, and compelled their surrender.

JOHNSON, WALLACE W.: Born in Newfield, NY. Sergeant, Company G, 6th Pennsylvania Reserves. Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863. Citation: 8 August 1900. With five other volunteers gallantly charged on a number of the enemy's sharpshooters concealed in a log house, captured them, and brought them into the Union lines.

KEOUGH, JOHN: Born in Ireland. Corporal, Company E, 67th Pennsylvania Infantry. Sailors Creek, Va., 6 April 1865. Citation: 3 May 1865. Capture of battle flag of 50th Georgia Infantry (C.S.A.).

LAFFERTY, JOHN: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in New York, NY. Fireman, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Wyalusing in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. Served on board the U.S.S. Wyalusing and participated in a plan to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Volunteering for the hazardous mission, Lafferty participated in the transfer of two torpedoes across an island swamp and then served as sentry to keep guard of clothes and arms left by other members of the party. After being rejoined by others of the party who had been discovered before the plan could be completed, Lafferty succeeded in returning to the mother ship after spending 24 hours of discomfort in the rain and swamp. Born 1842, died Nov. 13, 1903, buried Mount Moriah Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA in the Naval Asylum Plot. Also known as John Laverty and is a Double Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. His second Medal of Honor was awarded for his bravery on September 14, 1881, while he was serving in the United States Navy as a Fireman First Class on board the "USS Alaska" at Callao Bay, Peru. His citation reads "Following the rupture of the stop-valve chamber on that vessel, Laverty hauled the fires from under the boiler". This Medal was issued on October 18, 1884. He enlisted in the Civil War as John Lafferty and his Civil War MOH is recorded under this name. When he re-enlisted in the Navy as John Laverty which is the name on his government issue headstone.

LEAR, NICHOLAS: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Rhode Island. Quartermaster, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS New Ironsides at Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864 and 13, 14 and 15 January 1865. Citation: 22 June 1865. Lear served on board the U.S.S. New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864; and 13, 14, and 15 January 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first two days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 January, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire order was given by the flagship. Born 1826, died July 4, 1902, buried Mount Moriah Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA in the Naval Asylum Plot.

LEON, PIERRE: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in New Orleans, La. Captain of the Forecastle, U.S. Navy. Aboard the USS Baron De Kalb, Yazoo River, 23 to 27 December 1862. Citation: 3 April 1863. Serving on board the U.S.S. Baron De Kalb, Yazoo River Expedition, 23 to 27 December 1862. Proceeding under orders up the Yazoo River, the U.S.S. Baron De Kalb, with the object of capturing or destroying the enemy's transports, came upon the steamers John Walsh, R. J. Locklan, Golden Age and the Scotland sunk on a bar where they were ordered fired. Continuing up the river, she was fired on, but upon returning the fire, caused the enemy's retreat. Returning down the Yazoo, she destroyed and captured larger quantities of enemy equipment and several prisoners. Serving bravely throughout this action, Leon, as captain of the forecastle, "distinguished himself in the various actions."

LLOYD, BENJAMIN: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in England. Coal Heaver, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Wyalusing in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. Serving on board the U.S.S. Wyalusing and participating in a plan to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Volunteering for the hazardous mission, Lloyd participated in the transfer of two torpedoes across an island swamp. Serving as boatkeeper, he aided in rescuing others of the party who had been detected before the plan could be completed, but who escaped, leaving detection of the plan impossible. By his skill and courage, Lloyd succeeded in returning to the mother ship after spending 24 hours of discomfort in the rain and swamp.

MARTIN, EDWARD S.: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Ireland. Quartermaster, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Calena in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Citation: 22 June 1865. On board the U.S.S. Calena during the attack on enemy forts at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Securely lashed to the side of the Oneida which had suffered the loss of her steering apparatus and an explosion of her boiler from enemy fire, the Calena aided the stricken vessel past the enemy forts to safety. Despite heavy damage to his ship from raking enemy fire, Martin performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the action.

MARTIN, JAMES: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Derry, Ireland in 1826. Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Aboard USS Richmond in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Citation: 31 December 1864. As captain of a gun on board the U.S.S. Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sgt. Martin fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2 hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan. Died October 29, 1895, buried Mount Moriah Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA.

MUNSELL, HARVEY M.: Born in Steuben County, NY. Sergeant, Company A, 99th Pennsylvania Infantry. Gettysburg, Pa, 1 to 3 July 1863. Citation: 5 February 1866. Gallant and courageous conduct as color bearer. (This noncommissioned officer carried the colors of his regiment through 13 engagements.)

ORTEGA, JOHN: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Spain. Seaman, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Saratoga. Citation: 31 December 1864. Served as seaman on board the U.S.S. Saratoga during actions of that vessel on 2 occasions. Carrying out his duties courageously during these actions, Ortega conducted himself gallantly through both periods. Promoted to acting master's mate.

PHILLIPS, JOSIAH: Born in Wyoming County, NY. Private, Company E, 148th Pennsylvania Infantry. Sutherland Station, Va., 2 April 1865. Citation: 10 May 1865. Capture of flag.

RANNAHAN: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in County Monahan, Ireland. Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps. Aboard USS Minnesota at Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Citation: 22 June 1865. On board the U.S.S. Minnesota in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Cpl. Rannahan advanced to the top of the sandhill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

SACRISTE, LOUIS J.: (Photo) Born in New Castle County, Del. First Lieutenant, Company D, 116th Pennsylvania Infantry. Chancellorsville, Va., 3 May 1863. Citation: 3I January 1889. Saved from capture a gun of the 5th Maine Battery. Voluntarily carried orders which resulted in saving from destruction or capture the picket line of the 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps. (August 6, 1999)

SWAP, JACOB E.
: Born in Calnehoose, NY. Private, Company H, 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry.. Wilderness, Va., 5 May 1864. Citation: 19 November 1897. Although assigned to other duty, he voluntarily joined his regiment in a charge and fought with it until severely wounded.

TAYLOR, ANTHONY: Born October 11, 1837 in Burlington, NJ. Died May 21, 1984. First Lieutenant, Company A, 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Chickamauga, Ga., 20 September 1863. Citation: 4 December 1893. Held out to the last with a small force against the advance of superior numbers of the enemy. Taylor is buried in Saint James the Less Episcopal Church burial ground in Philadelphia, Pa.

THOMPSON, HENRY A.: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in England. Private, U.S. Marine Corps. Aboard USS Minnesota at Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Citation: 22 June 1865. On board the U.S.S. Minnesota in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Private Thompson advanced partly through a breach in the palisades and nearer to the fort than any man from his ship despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark, when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

VEALE, MOSES: Born in Bridgeton, NJ. Captain, Company F, 109th Pennsylvania Infantry.. Wauhatchie, Tenn., 28 October 1863. Citation: 17 January 1894. Gallantry in action manifesting throughout the engagement coolness, zeal, judgment, and courage. His horse was shot from under him and he was hit by 4 enemy bullets.

WAINWRIGHT, JOHN: Born in Syracuse, NY. First Lieutenant, Company F, 97th Pennsylvania Infantry. Fort Fisher, N.C., 15 January 1865. Citation: 24 June 1890. Gallant and meritorious conduct, where, as first lieutenant, he commanded the regiment.

WARD, NELSON W.: Born in Columbiana County, Ohio. Private, Company M, 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry.. Staunton River Bridge, Va., 25 June 1864. Citation: 10 September 1897. Voluntarily took part in a charge; went alone in front of his regiment under a heavy fire to secure the body of his captain, who had been killed in the action.

WHITE, JOSEPH: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Washington, DC. Captain of the Gun, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS New Ironsides at Fort Fisher, 24 and 24 December, 1864 and 13, 14 and 15 January, 1865. Citation: 22 June 1865. White served on board the U.S.S. New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864; and 13,14, and 15 January 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first two days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 January, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ships battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire order was given by the flagship.

WILLIAMS, PETER: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Norway. Seaman, U.S. Navy. Aboard Ironclad Steamer USS Monitor at Hampton Roads, 9 March 1862. Citation: 3 April 1863. Serving on board the U.S.S. Ironclad Steamer Monitor, Hampton Roads, 9 March 1862. During the engagement between the U.S.S. Monitor and the C.S.S. Merrimack, Williams gallantly served throughout the engagement as quartermaster, piloting the Monitor throughout the battle in which the Merrimack, after being damaged, retired from the scene of the battle.

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in Ireland. Landsman, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS Lehigh in Charleston Harbor, 16 November 1863. Citation: 16 April 1864. On board the U.S.S. Lehigh, Charleston Harbor, 16 November 1863, during the hazardous task of freeing the Lehigh, which had been grounded, and was under heavy enemy fire from Fort Moultrie. After several previous attempts had been made, Williams succeeded in passing in a small boat from the Lehigh to the Nahant with a line bent on a hawser. This courageous action while under severe enemy fire enabled the Lehigh to be freed from her helpless position.

WILLIS, RICHARD: Accredited to Pennsylvania. Born in England. Coxswain, U.S. Navy. Aboard USS New Ironsides at Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864 and 13, 14 and 15 January 1865. Citation: 22 June 1865. Willis served on board the U.S.S. New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864; and 13, 14 and 15 January 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first two days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 January, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night, despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy troops came out of their bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire order was given by the flagship.
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